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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 135

Cover image of 'Glioblastoma'

Glioblastoma (June 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet gives an overview of glioblastomas in adults and answers some of the questions you may have about this type of tumour. 

Cover image of 'Astrocytoma'

Astrocytoma (October 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This fact sheet gives an overview of astrocytomas in adults and how they are treated and answers some of the questions you may have about this type of tumour. It doesn’t deal in detail with grade 4 astrocytoma (glioblastoma/GBM), which is explained in a separate fact sheet. 

Cover image of 'Childhood brain tumours'

Childhood brain tumours (February 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet briefly describes brain tumours in children, the risk factors, diagnosis, treatment options and long-term side effects. It also describes the different types of brain tumours in children.

Cover image of 'Seizures (epilepsy) and brain tumours - introduction'

Seizures (epilepsy) and brain tumours - introduction (June 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This introduction to seizures addresses the following concerns: what is a seizure; what is epilepsy; what is the risk of having seizures; and what happens during a seizure. 

Cover image of 'Clomipramine and brain tumours'

Clomipramine and brain tumours (August 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

Clomipramine has been used to treat depression since the 1960s. Recently there has been debate about using it to treat brain tumours. There is some anecdotal evidence but there have been no clinical trials. This factsheet outlines some of the research and theories about Clomipramine.

Cover image of 'Steroids for children with brain tumours'

Steroids for children with brain tumours (February 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet describes when and why children might be given steroids, how they are taken and the possible side-effects, and answers some commonly asked questions that you may have about steroids in children.

Cover image of 'Chemotherapy for children with brain tumours'

Chemotherapy for children with brain tumours (February 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet has information about chemotherapy to treat brain tumours in children. It covers how chemotherapy works, why and how it is given, and preventing infection of your child’s central line and has answers to some common questions.

Cover image of 'Seizures (epilepsy) and brain tumours - treatment'

Seizures (epilepsy) and brain tumours - treatment (June 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet describes the options that are available for the treatment of seizures: anti-epileptic drugs; surgery; and vagus nerve stimulation. It also discusses the use of complementary therapies (ketogenic diet and cannabis).

Cover image of 'Radiotherapy for children with brain tumours'

Radiotherapy for children with brain tumours (February 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet has information on radiotherapy in children, the treatment procedure and some of its possible side-effects. 

Cover image of 'My daddy is my superhero'

My daddy is my superhero (2018)

North Staffordshire Press

My Daddy Is My Superhero was inspired by Michaelagh's own experience of explaining her husband's brain tumour illness to her eldest son, and is intended to help begin conversations surrounding serious illness and death with young children. At its core, My Daddy Is My Superhero is about the loving relationship between a little boy and his dad. It is a story about love, fun, beauty, loss, sadness, memories and celebration. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Gone in the morning. A writer’s journey of bereavement'

Gone in the morning. A writer’s journey of bereavement (2018)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

An exploration of death, bereavement and grief. This first hand account gives Geoff Mead's experience of responding to the loss of his wife from a brain tumour. Giving insight into the grieving process and how Geoff learned to manage his grief, this book will offer hope to anyone experiencing something similar. After coming to the realisation that mourning is a conscious process, to which we can apply creativity, passion and intelligence, Geoff explored the unknown territory of bereavement through his writing. The book shows how artful practice, such as writing, can help to make sense of our experience and navigate the wreckage of grief. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'Brain tumours and epilepsy'

Brain tumours and epilepsy (2017)

Brain Tumour Action

This booklet explains what epilepsy is, the types of seizures, how it is diagnosed,and treatment options. it also has tips on people can help themselves, what family and friends should do if someone has a seizure, and how seizures may affect daily life (driving, work, home life, sport). 

Cover image of 'The little white book. Aberdeen, The Highlands and surrounding areas. A directory of resources to help people  affected by a brain tumour'

The little white book. Aberdeen, The Highlands and surrounding areas. A directory of resources to help people affected by a brain tumour (January 2017)

Brainstrust

A directory of support services and resources for people with a brain tumour in Aberdeen, The Highlands and surrounding areas.

Cover image of 'No stomach. A guide for patients by patients'

No stomach. A guide for patients by patients (February 2017)

GIST Support UK

Although this booklet has been written mainly for patients suffering from a Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour (GIST), other patients who have had a total gastrectomy may also find it helpful. It describes how the gastrointestinal tract works, what happens if you have no stomach and the problems that may arise after surgery and later.

Cover image of 'GIST for beginners. A guide for patients by patients'

GIST for beginners. A guide for patients by patients (October 2017)

GIST Support UK

Booklet with information about GIST (gastrointestinal stromal tumour).

Cover image of 'My fatigue book. A resource to help you understand, manage and own fatigue'

My fatigue book. A resource to help you understand, manage and own fatigue (September 2017)

Brainstrust

This resource aims to enable patients and caregivers living with a brain tumour to understand what is meant by fatigue and to self-manage fatigue relating to brain tumours so that they: learn a new pace of living; take steps to mitigate the impact of fatigue; and make the most of what they can do, rather than what they can’t.

Cover image of 'My child has a brain or spinal tumour. A guide for parents and carers'

My child has a brain or spinal tumour. A guide for parents and carers (January 2017)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This booklet has detailed information for parents whose child has a brain or spinal tumour. It covers the typical signs and symptoms, diagnosis, the treatment options, clinical trials, supportive care during treatment, and ongoing needs after therapy. Appendices include the structure and function of the brain, a glossary of terms, support groups and useful sources of information.

Cover image of 'My employee has, or is caring for someone with, a brain tumour. How can I help?'

My employee has, or is caring for someone with, a brain tumour. How can I help? (September 2017)

The Brain Tumour Charity

Guidance for empoylers on how best to support an employee who has a brain tumour, or who is caring for someone with a brain tumour.

Cover image of 'Employment charter: for people with a brain tumour'

Employment charter: for people with a brain tumour (September 2017)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This charter will guide you on the rights that people have when at work or seeking work, whether you are an employee or an employer. It can also be used by people who are caring for someone with a brain tumour. 

Cover image of 'Brain tumours'

Brain tumours (June 2017)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Written to accompany 'Children and young people with cancer: A parent's guide', this factsheet explains what a brain tumour is, and describes the signs and symptoms, tests and treatment options.

Cover image of 'Telling your employer'

Telling your employer (September 2017)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet aims to help people look at the pros and cons of telling their employer about their, or their loved one's, diagnosis, and how to go about it. 

Cover image of 'Mary has a brain tumour [Welsh]'

Mary has a brain tumour [Welsh] (March 2017)

CLIC Sargent

Mary is five years old when she is diagnosed with a brain tumour. This illustrated, colour storybook describes what happens when she has to go to the hospital for tests and treatment. The story follows Mary from first feeling ill, through diagnosis and treatment, to recovery and return to normal life.

Cover image of 'Possible effects of brain tumours and their treatment for adults'

Possible effects of brain tumours and their treatment for adults (September 2017)

The Brain Tumour Charity

A poster to help people with a brain tumour make their employer or colleagues aware of the possible effects of brain tumours and their treatment.

Cover image of 'Employment adjustments'

Employment adjustments (September 2017)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This sheet gives examples of 'reasonable adjustments' that can be made in the workplace according to the side effects that you are experiencing. You can use these suggestions to start a conversation with your employer about things that can help you in the workplace.

Cover image of 'Mary has a brain tumour'

Mary has a brain tumour (September 2017)

CLIC Sargent

Mary is five years old when she is diagnosed with a brain tumour. This illustrated, colour storybook describes what happens when she has to go to the hospital for tests and treatment. The story follows Mary from first feeling ill, through diagnosis and treatment, to recovery and return to normal life.

Cover image of 'Lucy has a tumour'

Lucy has a tumour (September 2017)

CLIC Sargent

Lucy is five years old when she is diagnosed with cancer. This illustrated, colour storybook describes what happens when she has to go to the hospital for tests and treatment. The story follows Lucy from first feeling ill, through diagnosis and treatment, to recovery and returning to normal life.

Cover image of 'Understanding lung cancer'

Understanding lung cancer (December 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet has detailed information on the causes of lung cancer, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment options. Includes information on clinical trials and issues such as feelings, talking to children, and financial support. 

Cover image of 'Lucy has a tumour [Welsh]'

Lucy has a tumour [Welsh] (March 2017)

CLIC Sargent

Lucy is five years old when she is diagnosed with cancer. This illustrated, colour storybook describes what happens when she has to go to the hospital for tests and treatment. The story follows Lucy from first feeling ill, through diagnosis and treatment, to recovery and returning to normal life.

Cover image of 'Brain tumour. A guide for patients and carers'

Brain tumour. A guide for patients and carers (March 2017)

Brain and Spine Foundation

This booklet provides information on brain tumours in adults and focuses on primary brain tumours. It describes brain tumours and provides information on common symptoms, tests and investigations and possible treatments. It also provides information on rehabilitation and returning to everyday activities.

Cover image of 'Spinal tumours. A guide for patients and carers'

Spinal tumours. A guide for patients and carers (May 2017)

Brain and Spine Foundation

This booklet provides information on spinal tumours in adults. It provides information on common symptoms, tests and investigations, and possible treatments. It also provides information on recovery and returning to everyday activities.  

Cover image of 'About brain tumours'

About brain tumours (September 2017)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This booklet explains what a brain tumour is, how they are graded, and the different types. It also considers possible causes and risk factors, and treatment options.

Cover image of 'The little white book. South East Scotland. A directory of resources to help people affected by a brain tumour'

The little white book. South East Scotland. A directory of resources to help people affected by a brain tumour (April 2016)

Brainstrust

A directory of support services and resources for people with a brain tumour in South East Scotland.

Cover image of 'The little white book. Glasgow and surrounding areas. A directory of resources to help people
affected by a brain tumour'

The little white book. Glasgow and surrounding areas. A directory of resources to help people affected by a brain tumour (May 2016)

Brainstrust

A directory of support services and resources for people with a brain tumour in Glasgow and the surrounding areas.

Cover image of 'The little white book. Tees Valley and surrounding areas. A directory of resources to help people affected by a brain tumour'

The little white book. Tees Valley and surrounding areas. A directory of resources to help people affected by a brain tumour (November 2016)

Brainstrust

A directory of support services and resources for people with a brain tumour in the Tees Valley and surrounding areas 

Cover image of 'The little white book. Greater London. A directory of resources to help people affected by a brain tumour'

The little white book. Greater London. A directory of resources to help people affected by a brain tumour (May 2016)

Brainstrust

A directory of support services and resources for people with a brain tumour in Greater London.

Cover image of 'My radiotherapy book. Information to help you understand the treatment'

My radiotherapy book. Information to help you understand the treatment (January 2016)

Brainstrust

This leaflet describes the range of radiotherapy treatments currently available to treat brain tumours. It aims to help people understand what is the most appropriate and best treatment for their type of brain tumour.

Cover image of 'The little white book. North West Children’s. A directory of resources to help children affected by a brain tumour'

The little white book. North West Children’s. A directory of resources to help children affected by a brain tumour (October 2016)

Brainstrust

A directory of support services and resources for children with a brain tumour in the North West of England.

Cover image of 'The little white book. Mersyside. A directory of resources to help people affected by a brain tumour'

The little white book. Mersyside. A directory of resources to help people affected by a brain tumour (April 2016)

Brainstrust

A directory of support services and resources for people with a brain tumour in Merseyside.

Cover image of 'The little white book. Greater Manchester. A directory of resources to help people  affected by a brain tumour'

The little white book. Greater Manchester. A directory of resources to help people affected by a brain tumour (October 2016)

Brainstrust

A directory of support services and resources for people with a brain tumour in Greater Manchester.

Cover image of 'Travelling and brain tumours'

Travelling and brain tumours (April 2016)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet aims to give an overview of some of the options and help available for people who have or have had a brain tumour. It covers travelling locally and for medical appointments, travelling abroad and travel insurance companies. Includes details of resources about travelling and related issues that may be helpful.

Cover image of 'Germ cell tumours'

Germ cell tumours (August 2016)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Written to accompany 'Children and young people with cancer: A parent's guide', this factsheet explains what a germ cell tumour is and describes the signs, symptoms, tests and treatment options.

Cover image of 'Patient guide to brain tumour treatment and services'

Patient guide to brain tumour treatment and services (2016)

The Brain Tumour Charity

Finding out that you have a brain tumour is a frightening and overwhelming experience for anyone. You may feel as though your whole world has been turned upside down. This booklet aims to guide you through the system, answer your questions, and outlines some basic aspects of care that everyone should expect when they’re diagnosed with a brain tumour. 

Cover image of 'The butterfly within. A triathlete's race against a brain tumour'

The butterfly within. A triathlete's race against a brain tumour (2016)

Book Guild Publishing

"The butterfly within" follows Special Educational Needs PE teacher and international triathlete Rachel Bown through a year which changes her life forever. It begins on the day she is diagnosed with a brain tumour and finishes when she proudly returns to racing for Team GB. The reader is taken on a roller coaster ride of emotions. We witness hope exploring new depths and determination reaching new heights. She writes about the characters she meets along the way and how they have helped her to become the person she is today. Throughout her story, Rachel recognises the love of those closest to her and understands fully how lucky she is to have their unwavering support. Her focus is always on embracing the life she has been given and defying the so-called insurmountable. Rachel's humorous outlook will have the reader laughing with her wit and honesty; and perhaps shedding a few tears at the low points of her story. Fundamentally, she wants to show that people are good and kind and that if you have faith, there is always hope. A truly inspirational story as Rachel fights her tumour with everything she's got! (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Living with Timmy'

Living with Timmy (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

The writer’s personal story, who on the threshold of retirement, is diagnosed with a rare brain tumour. How will he cope as he uncovers more and more detail about the tumour? Does he opt for risky brain surgery or for a “watch and wait” strategy? And will his life ever be the same again? Follow his personal journey from diagnosis to the present day in this story. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Pear shaped'

Pear shaped (2015)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Adam is a 44-year-old London lawyer and father of three. Completely out of the blue, and for no reason other than sheer dumb chance, he was diagnosed with a rare and aggressive brain tumour. Adam has endured radiotherapy and chemotherapy which were preceded by major brain surgery to remove the tumour - helpfully described by his surgeon as being the size and shape of a pear. Using the blackest of humour, this book charts Adam's journey from normality to having a disease regularly described as a “death sentence”. How will he cope with the treatment? How will his relationship with family and friends be affected? Most important of all, how will his hair come through this? Quite simply, it is the funniest book so far this year about brain cancer. Warning - this book is intended for mature audiences due to the subject matter and use of strong language. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cancer determination and me'

Cancer determination and me (2015)

Self-published using AuthorHouse

The author was once an all round sportsman keeping fit and healthy until one day he was diagnosed with a brain tumour. This book is about what he had and what he has been through and how he came out fighting and mainly how motivated he was. How he used to just try to get up and do things in this book are all his feelings of what he has been through. It is strange because his life and his perspective on life have changed dramatically since he was diagnosed with a brain tumour. He has missed a lot of school and study time because of the intense and lengthy treatment he received. He had to Re-learn basic skills, especially basic physical skills that most people take for granted, such as writing, walking and other every day activities. He believes that this experience has made him a more determined and motivated person. He had to work very hard to get his life back but he never complained or gives in. The words that got him through everything where 'No pain no gain' and he will look forward to using his inner strength as he go forward in life. He wants to pass this book around the world for people to understand that no matter how hard life is or how hard you fight to beat an illness. If you want something that bad YOU CAN DO IT... (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Brain tumours for dummys'

Brain tumours for dummys (2015)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Thinking nothing of an epileptic seizure, my carefree and single-thinking lifestyle continued as usual. That was until the results of the scan. A brain tumour stopped me in my tracks. Suddenly I had to rely on others. Moving out of my crime-ridden area was supposed to be a positive move towards recovery following the most mind bending experience of "awake" brain surgery. But Sarah and I couldn't have been more wrong. Our new home was in the flat beneath the neighbours from hell. Radiotherapy may have been easy if it hadn’t been for the scum determined to make our lives a misery, sending me to the brink of despair. With a lifestyle that featured an unhealthy amount of alcohol and facing up to my addictions and self-loathing, the early grave was looking more likely than the millionaire life I dreamed of. Getting back to work and experiencing new cultures helped to put me back on track. Rather than dwell on my own self-pity I drew inspiration from the world and people around me until finally I'd gotten hold of a normal life. A normal life that didn't last long. The townships in Africa, the petrol bombings, murders and car crashes that I'd witnessed in such a small space of time; none of them came close to the next chapter in my life. Finding out I would be a dad was one thing, but triplets? The path forward from there on in would prove to be chaotic but truly magical. The joys of a becoming a triplet father from that astonishing moment of the baby scan through to the events of the birth and beyond, coupled with the devastating deaths of good friends taught me the true meaning of life. But all that was the easy bit… (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'A brain tumour's travel tale'

A brain tumour's travel tale (2014)

Lulu.com

This is the diary of Claire Bullimore, who was diagnosed at the age of 25 with a life-threatening intraventricular meningioma, in other words a brain tumour the size of a grapefruit! It is not always easy for a person on the outside to see what is really happening to someone affected by a traumatic experience such as this. The book shows the true emotion of someone dealing with the hardships of a brain tumour, surgery, recovery and then the scars inside and out. Written as a series of diary entries you will feel like you are there on the journey. There is love, friendship and courage - you will cry, laugh, find things you didn't know before. This book can help families and friends or other outsiders to see what a brain tumour survivor really wants you to know. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Until further notice, I am alive'

Until further notice, I am alive (2014)

Granta Books

In 2008, Tom Lubbock was diagnosed with a brain tumour, and told he had only one or two years to live. In this remarkable record of those years, lived out in three-month intervals between scans, he examines the question of how to live with death in sight. As the tumour progressed, Tom engaged intensely and imaginatively with work, art, friends, and his wife and their young son, while trying to remain focused on the fact of his impending death. His tumour was located in the area of the brain associated with language, and he describes losing control over the spoken and written word and the resources he drew on to keep communicating; a struggle which brought him ever closer to the mysteries of the origin of speech. As the Independent's chief art critic, he was renowned for the clarity and unconventionality of his writing, and the same fierce intelligence permeates this extraordinary memoir. This is a book written by a man wholly engaged with life even as it ends. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The iceberg. A memoir'

The iceberg. A memoir (2014)

Atlantic Books

In 2008 the art critic Tom Lubbock was diagnosed with a brain tumour. The tumour was located in the area controlling speech and language, and would eventually rob him of the ability to speak. He died early in 2011. Marion Coutts was his wife. In short bursts of beautiful, textured prose, Coutts describes the eighteen months leading up to her partner's death. This book is an account of a family unit, man, woman, young child, under assault, and how the three of them fought to keep it intact. Written with extraordinary narrative force and power, The Iceberg is almost shocking in its rawness. It charts the deterioration of Tom's speech even as it records the developing language of his child. Fury, selfishness, grief, indignity and impotence are all examined and brought to light. Yet out of this comes a rare story about belonging, an 'adventure of being and dying'. This book is a celebration of each other, friends, family, art, work, love and language. (Publisher)

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