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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 135

Cover image of 'Understanding primary brain tumours'

Understanding primary brain tumours (September 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about primary brain tumours. It is for anyone who has been diagnosed with a primary brain tumour. There is also information for carers, family members and friends. The booklet explains the signs and symptoms of a primary brain tumour, and how it is diagnosed and treated. It also has information about emotional, practical and financial issues. 

Cover image of 'Personality changes'

Personality changes (September 2019)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This leaflet describes personality changes that may occur in brain tumour patients and the reasons behind these changes. It has advice on coping with personality changes and sources of support.

Cover image of 'Ependymoma (in children). What you need to know'

Ependymoma (in children). What you need to know (July 2019)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This leaflet gives an overview of ependymoma in children and answers questions you may have about this type of tumour.

Cover image of 'Speech and language difficulties'

Speech and language difficulties (September 2019)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This leaflet explains how brain tumours can affect communication. It describes the communication difficulties that someone with a brain tumour may experience, and the emotional difficulties that this may cause for them and their family and friends.

Cover image of 'Thinking difficulties (cognitive impairment)'

Thinking difficulties (cognitive impairment) (September 2019)

The Brain Tumour Charity

Many people diagnosed with a brain tumour will have some form of cognitive impairment (difficulties with their thinking abilities), due to the presence of the tumour and the pressure it puts on the brain. This leaflet describes the types of impairment that might develop and how they are affected by the location of the tumour, treatment and drugs, and by emotional and psychological factors.

Cover image of 'Coping with thinking difficulties (cognitive impairment)'

Coping with thinking difficulties (cognitive impairment) (September 2019)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This leaflet explains what is meant by cognitive impairment and has suggestions to help people cope.

Cover image of 'Proton beam therapy and brain tumours'

Proton beam therapy and brain tumours (October 2019)

The Brain Tumour Charity

Proton Beam Therapy (PBT) is a highly specialised form of radiotherapy that is more targeted than conventional radiotherapy. This means it causes less damage to the healthy tissue of the brain and so causes fewer side-effects. However, PBT is only suitable for a few types of brain tumour and, in most cases, does not lead to better outcomes than conventional radiotherapy. This factsheet describes PBT and how does it compare to conventional radiotherapy, who can have it, what it involves and side-effects, and answers some commonly asked questions.

Cover image of 'Coping with speech and language difficulties'

Coping with speech and language difficulties (August 2019)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This leaflet has tips for dealing with speech and language difficulties from people affected by a brain tumour and from healthcare professionals specialised in treating brain tumours. 

Cover image of 'Coping with depression and low mood'

Coping with depression and low mood (October 2019)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This leaflet has suggestions to help you cope with low mood and depression.

Cover image of 'Being a carer'

Being a carer (July 2019)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This leaflet has suggestions to help carers manage their role, such as having a break, and getting practical and emotional support.

Cover image of 'Diet and nutrition'

Diet and nutrition (December 2019)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This leaflet is for anyone receiving treatment or who has recently completed their treatment.There’s no specific food or type of diet that can control or treat brain tumours, but controlling your diet may help to improve your quality of life and manage the side-effects of treatment, such as dry mouth, nausea, poor appetite, and weight loss.

Cover image of 'Understanding cancer of unknown primary'

Understanding cancer of unknown primary (June 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Information about cancer of unknown primary (CUP). This booklet explains what CUP is and why the primary cancer cannot be found, and describes how it is diagnosed, the tests that might be carried out, and the treatment options. It also covers coping with CUP, feelings, and financial help.

Cover image of 'Depression and low mood'

Depression and low mood (October 2019)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This leaflet explains what depression is and describes the signs and symptoms and possible causes.

Cover image of 'Driving and brain tumours'

Driving and brain tumours (July 2019)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This leaflet outlines some key facts in relation to driving for people who have a brain tumour.

Cover image of 'Returning to school. A teacher's guide for pupils with a brain tumour, during and after treatment'

Returning to school. A teacher's guide for pupils with a brain tumour, during and after treatment (2019)

The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust|Cerebra

This publication aims to guide teachers and schools faced with the task of supporting a pupil with a brain or spinal tumour who may be absent for some time, or who may have sporadic attendance with a very serious illness and potentially devastating long term effects. It explains what the pupil may be going through both medically and psychologically. It offers practical strategies for ensuring supportive re-integration back to school. Suggestions are given for how teachers, assistants and SENCOs can provide sustained and targeted support for pupils who face extended treatments, devastating long term side effects or an uncertain future.

Cover image of 'Supporting your pupil after a cancer diagnosis. An information guide for teachers helping children and young
people returning to school after a diagnosis of cancer'

Supporting your pupil after a cancer diagnosis. An information guide for teachers helping children and young people returning to school after a diagnosis of cancer (December 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Getting back to school is vital for children with cancer. School helps them to feel ‘normal’ and reduces the isolation and loneliness which many children with cancer face. Teachers have a really important role to play in encouraging the child’s integration back into a school routine. But cancer is a scary word for many and it is completely normal for teachers and others working at the school to feel upset – not just for the awful situation facing the pupil and their family, but also for the impact on the rest of the class and school community. This guide aims to lessen some of the worries you may have by giving simple practical information and advice on a variety of issues faced by the child and their family, and some ideas on how to help them within a school setting.

Cover image of 'Surgery for operable pancreatic cancer'

Surgery for operable pancreatic cancer (March 2018)

Pancreatic Cancer Action

This booklet for patients and carers covers surgical procedures for those who are able to have their tumour removed. It has information on the different types of surgery available and practical information about being in hospital and returning home. It also includes a section about second opinions, clinical trials and questions to ask your doctor, and a glossary to explain some of the terms used.

Cover image of 'Who's who in your clinical team?'

Who's who in your clinical team? (July 2018)

Brainstrust

A who's who of healthcare professionals involved in the care of someone with a brain tumour: GP; consultant neurosurgeon; consultant neurologist; consultant radiologist; neuro-oncologist; clinical psychologist; neuro-ophthalmologist; community neurological rehabilitation nurse; neuro-oncology clinical nurse specialist; epilepsy nurse; palliative care nurse; specialist allied health professional; disability co-ordinator (higher education). It describes the role of each professional and how they can help.

Cover image of 'Patient guide. Diagnosis'

Patient guide. Diagnosis (July 2018)

Brainstrust

One in a series of eight leaflets that form the Brain Tumour Patient Guide.

Cover image of 'Patient guide. Follow-up'

Patient guide. Follow-up (July 2018)

Brainstrust

One in a series of eight leaflets that form the Brain Tumour Patient Guide.

Cover image of 'Patient guide. Introduction'

Patient guide. Introduction (July 2018)

Brainstrust

Introduction to the leaflets in the Patient Guide.

Cover image of 'Patient guide. Receiving diagnosis after biopsy'

Patient guide. Receiving diagnosis after biopsy (July 2018)

Brainstrust

One in a series of eight leaflets that form the Brain Tumour Patient Guide.

Cover image of 'Patient guide. Palliative care'

Patient guide. Palliative care (July 2018)

Brainstrust

One in a series of eight leaflets that form the Brain Tumour Patient Guide.

Cover image of 'Patient guide. End of life care'

Patient guide. End of life care (July 2018)

Brainstrust

One in a series of eight leaflets that form the Brain Tumour Patient Guide.

Cover image of 'Patient guide. Treatment'

Patient guide. Treatment (July 2018)

Brainstrust

One in a series of eight leaflets that form the Brain Tumour Patient Guide.

Cover image of 'Patient guide. Survivorship'

Patient guide. Survivorship (July 2018)

Brainstrust

One in a series of eight leaflets that form the Brain Tumour Patient Guide.

Cover image of 'What is a brain tumour?'

What is a brain tumour? (August 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet explains what a brain tumour is, how they are graded, the different types of brain tumour, and the possible causes and answers some common questions you may have about brain tumours.

Cover image of 'Rare ovarian tumours'

Rare ovarian tumours (May 2018)

Ovacome

This factsheet describes some of the rarer ovarian cancers and how they may be treated, namely: germ cell tumours; sex-cord stromal tumours (granulosa cell tumour and Sertoli-Leydig cell tumours); small-cell carcinoma of the ovary; Brenner tumours; and Krukenberg tumours.

Cover image of 'Symptoms of a brain tumour in adults'

Symptoms of a brain tumour in adults (May 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

In this factsheet: What are the symptoms of a brain tumour?; Symptoms due to raised pressure within the skull; Symptoms due to location within the brain; What should I do if I think I might have a brain tumour?

Cover image of 'Head Smart. Early diagnosis of brain tumours'

Head Smart. Early diagnosis of brain tumours (2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

Leaflet with information about the common symptoms of brain tumours in children and young people and what to do if a child is experiencing any of the symptoms. It also has information about the Headsmart campaign and details of further support.

Cover image of 'Your child's health team (children with a brain tumour)'

Your child's health team (children with a brain tumour) (February 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet outlines the roles of some of the health care professionals who may be part of a child’s multidisciplinary team.

Cover image of 'Scans for adults with brain tumours'

Scans for adults with brain tumours (May 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet describes CT scans and MRI scans - the two scans most commonly used in the diagnosis and monitoring of brain tumours - and answers common questions you may have.

Cover image of 'Antineoplaston therapy'

Antineoplaston therapy (January 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

Antineoplaston therapy is an alternative treatment available in America. This factsheet gives an overview of antineoplaston therapy and some of the literature behind the theories.

Cover image of 'Memory difficulties and brain tumours'

Memory difficulties and brain tumours (August 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

If you have a brain tumour or have received treatment for a brain tumour, you may experience memory difficulties; these could be because of the tumour itself or may be a result of surgery or treatment such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy. This factsheet describes what memory is, the types of memory, how a brain tumour may affect memory and answers some common questions about memory problems.

Cover image of 'Chemotherapy for adults with brain tumours'

Chemotherapy for adults with brain tumours (June 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet describes chemotherapy for brain tumours in adults. It describes what chemotherapy is, why it is given, how it is given, possible side-effects, and answers some common questions you may have about chemotherapy.

Cover image of 'Scans for children with brain tumours'

Scans for children with brain tumours (February 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

Information about CT and MRI scans for the parents/carers of a child with a brain tumour, including scan procedure, and how to prepare your child for a scan. It also has answers to some common questions you may have about CT or MRI scans.

Cover image of 'Neurosurgery for adults with brain tumours'

Neurosurgery for adults with brain tumours (July 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet gives an overview of neurosurgery for brain tumours and gives an idea of the processes and procedures you may experience.

Cover image of 'Seizures (epilepsy) and brain tumours - living with'

Seizures (epilepsy) and brain tumours - living with (June 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet addresses the impact of living with seizures, including the emotional aspects, driving, identifying triggers, and safety and first aid.

Cover image of 'Clinical trials for brain tumours'

Clinical trials for brain tumours (June 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet describes what a clinical trial is, the four phases in developing a new treatment, and the benefits and risks of taking part.

Cover image of 'Understanding testicular cancer'

Understanding testicular cancer (August 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet explains what testicular cancer is, the symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and surgery. It also has sections on sexuality and fertility (including sperm storage), emotions, self-help and support. Includes details of useful organisations.

Cover image of 'Learning difficulties in children with brain tumours'

Learning difficulties in children with brain tumours (February 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This fact sheet gives an overview of some of the learning difficulties your child may experience as the result of a brain tumour and also of the support and possible plans of action (strategies) available to help them in their learning. 

Cover image of 'Vision loss and brain tumours. What you need to know'

Vision loss and brain tumours. What you need to know (July 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This booklet summarises some of the key types of vision problems that may occur as a result of brain tumours or their treatment, and how to adapt to them. 

Cover image of 'Steroids for adults with brain tumours'

Steroids for adults with brain tumours (May 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet describes what steroids are, how, when and why they are used, and the possible side effects. It also answers some questions that you may have about steroids.

Cover image of 'Radiotherapy for adults with brain tumours'

Radiotherapy for adults with brain tumours (May 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet describes how radiotherapy treatment is planned, the radiotherapy mask, and the treatment procedure. It also answers some questions about radiotherapy, such as: who will my medical team consist of; will treatment be painful; how long does it take; what are the typical side effects; will I need to give up work; where can I find a wig or headwear.

Cover image of 'Helping your child to eat (children with brain tumours)'

Helping your child to eat (children with brain tumours) (February 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

Practical suggestions for parents/carers to helping their child to eat if they have had treatment for a brain tumour.

Cover image of 'Understanding kidney cancer'

Understanding kidney cancer (August 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about a type of kidney cancer called renal cell cancer. It is for anyone who has been diagnosed with kidney cancer, or is having tests for it. There is also information for carers, family members and friends. The booklet explains how renal cell cancer is diagnosed and treated. The booklet also talks about your feelings when you are diagnosed with cancer. You can find practical advice on dealing with work and finances towards the end of the booklet.

Cover image of 'Financial support and brain tumours'

Financial support and brain tumours (November 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet gives a brief outline of the financial support that may be available to you if you are living with, or caring for someone who has, a brain tumour. 

Cover image of 'Questions to ask'

Questions to ask (May 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

A list of questions for people to ask their healthcare team at different stages of diagnosis and treatment.

Cover image of 'Watch and wait (active monitoring)'

Watch and wait (active monitoring) (May 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet explains when and why watch and wait is sometimes more appropriate than immediate intervention. It also looks at how to deal with the emotional impact of receiving this type of treatment. 

Cover image of 'Neurosurgery for children with brain tumours'

Neurosurgery for children with brain tumours (February 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This factsheet gives an overview of surgery for brain tumours in children and helps to answer some questions you may have about brain surgery. 

Sorry, no publications found.
Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 7 days a week, 8am-8pm