Publications directory

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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 135

Cover image of 'Toby the teapot's daddy has a poorly lid'

Toby the teapot's daddy has a poorly lid (2014)

Paula and Richard Middleton

A short story for children that uses accessible characters to help explain to a child about a parent being diagnosed with a brain tumour. It follows Toby the teapot's daddy through the journey of the first signs and symptoms, diagnosis and treatment.

Cover image of 'My left boob. A cancer diary'

My left boob. A cancer diary (2013)

Book Guild Publishing

Diagnosed with breast cancer in her fifties, award-winning actress and glamour girl-about-town Sally Farmiloe-Neville decided to keep a diary. This is the frank and honest account of her fight to beat the tumour within, retain as much of her left breast as possible - and carry on working meanwhile. Filled with helpful advice to fellow sufferers based on her own experiences, needle-phobic Sally documents her treatment as she goes through the horrors of chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy, helped by a healer, a hypnotherapist and a special diet. When her trademark 'big' hair falls out she reveals how she coped by getting ‘Crystal’, a long blonde NHS wig that wowed every man she met. Her family and friends - including many famous household names - are by her side throughout, but many of them have fought their own battles with the big C and Sally documents their stories, too. Always upbeat, never sorry for herself, this is the courageous tale of one woman's struggle to regain her health. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Tallulah tumour, friend or foe. A personal insight into a battle with a brain tumour'

Tallulah tumour, friend or foe. A personal insight into a battle with a brain tumour (2012)

Memoirs Publishing

Fiona Goldsby has emerged triumphant from the terrifying experience of suffering a serious brain tumour. She found very little written material was available to help her in her battle, so she has written Tallulah Tumour, Friend or Foe? to help others dealing with a similar diagnosis. It is intended to provide information about what the patient may expect, with hints and tips to deal with the various side effects. The information in the book will not only be helpful to patients but to caregivers and family members. And as you may guess from the title, there is plenty of humour as well. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Not the last goodbye. Reflections on life, death, healing and cancer'

Not the last goodbye. Reflections on life, death, healing and cancer (2011)

Pan Macmillan

This is the story of an award-winning psychiatrist and neuroscientist who was diagnosed with a brain tumour by his own MRI machine at the age of thirty. It is the story of a doctor turned patient who, after overcoming cancer against the odds, started a twenty-year crusade to inform people about the disease and inspire them to take responsibility for their health. It is the story of a husband and father who is told that the cancer has returned, and that he only has a short time left. This is a story about dying. But most of all, it is a story about living. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Ollie'

Ollie (2007)

Arrow Books Limited

Like the swallows, our son Ollie came in the spring and left in the autumn. Dancing, singing, swooping - there was something birdlike about his energy, joy and laughter - but also the fleeting, enigmatic quality of his life. When he was two he lost all his speech, as autism turned his life - and ours - into a baffling challenge. Then at four he had to face a new challenge when he almost died from leukaemia. But chemotherapy worked its magic and he made a full recovery. He was a tough survivor and nothing seemed to dim his spirit: he could light up a room and energize everyone around him. So it was a huge shock, after several cancer-free years, when a fatal brain tumour was discovered. This time his body had had enough and he died very suddenly. He was twelve. Ollie had extraordinary courage and endurance. Time after time he bounced back, determined to enjoy life. He was obstinate, mischievous, playful, flirtatious, quixotic, funny. He generated - and continues to generate - huge amounts of laughter. And he was very beautiful. We always felt that if autism had not unravelled the wiring of his neural pathways, he would have achieved extraordinary things. This is the story of the journey we made with Ollie. Unlike a mountaineer, pursuing extreme experiences out of choice, he had difficulty thrust upon him: he was forced to be brave. For me, too, the journey was far more compelling than any expedition. (Publisher)

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