We understand that people with cancer are worried about coronavirus. Here is the latest guidance. We will update it regularly.

Publications directory

Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 7 days a week, 8am-8pm

The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 628

Cover image of 'Thinking difficulties (cognitive impairment)'

Thinking difficulties (cognitive impairment) (September 2019)

The Brain Tumour Charity

Many people diagnosed with a brain tumour will have some form of cognitive impairment (difficulties with their thinking abilities), due to the presence of the tumour and the pressure it puts on the brain. This leaflet describes the types of impairment that might develop and how they are affected by the location of the tumour, treatment and drugs, and by emotional and psychological factors.

Cover image of 'The two faces of cancer'

The two faces of cancer (2019)

Troubador Publishing

Half of the UK population will receive a diagnosis of cancer at some point in their lives and most people will know someone who has been affected by this complex disease. Drawing from her three personal experiences with cancer alongside her professional experience as a counsellor and personal coach, Rebecca Brazier chronicles her journey through diagnosis, treatment and recovery. When talking about cancer we tend to think about the physical side effects of treatment. Although medical advances are saving and extending lives, less consideration is given to the emotional and psychological trauma which cancer creates. The Two Faces of Cancer describes and addresses this trauma and explores why cancer is difficult to recover from both personally and within society. It describes the devastation and powerful feelings cancer created for Rebecca and how she channelled these to create a meaningful life. It also draws from Rebecca's professional knowledge to analyse the emotional and psychological impact of cancer and to suggest routes to recovery. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer roller coaster. How to manage the emotional and mental impact'

The cancer roller coaster. How to manage the emotional and mental impact (2019)

Librotas

Two days after celebrating her 50th birthday, Juliette Chan had an unexpected birthday present: bowel cancer. Luckily, they caught it early, but once the treatment was over, the psychological side-effects surfaced. For many months, Juliette was adrift and felt lost. It seemed that everything in her life was up for review and she struggled to gain clarity about what to do next. There were many questions, such as: When will I feel normal again; Why am I not as motivated as before; Will the cancer come back; Why am I mentally exhausted. It took her a while to realise that the cancer had caused a whole load of losses: loss of trust in her body, self-image as a fit and healthy person, energy, confidence, motivation, income and much more. And that’s when the penny dropped; she was grieving. Cancer not only involves coping with the physical disease and treatment – it also means experiencing and dealing with hidden losses that will affect how you view and live your life. Every time you experience a loss, there is an emotional response: grief. Most people only associate grief with bereavement but it is in fact a natural reaction to any and all losses, including the hidden and intangible losses you face with cancer. Anyone who has or has had cancer, as well as their family and friends, will experience grief – because life has changed. This can show up as anger, frustration, anxiety, ‘depression’, fear, sadness, for example. If left unchecked or suppressed, grief will affect your mental health and emotional wellbeing. It doesn’t have to be like this; it is possible to take care of the emotional and mental impact of cancer and to live well. In her easy, relaxed style of writing, Juliette explains the emotional and mental impact of cancer and highlights the limitations of Mindfulness and positive thinking. She has also included a workbook with simple practical exercises that help to release the psychological side-effects and provide clarity. You can also read the candid stories of eight others who faced cancer: Robert describes his initial feelings of shock on diagnosis and how others helped him to cope, whereas Meena recounts going it alone; Petra shares how she continued to run throughout her treatment, and Susan talks movingly about the seemingly endless decision-making from diagnosis onwards; Mary, Tony and June recount their unique experiences of the same cancer

Cover image of 'Ovarian cancer and sexuality'

Ovarian cancer and sexuality (May 2018)

Ovacome

This factsheet has information and advice about sexuality during and after treatment for ovarian cancer. It covers topics such as sexual relations, psychological and emotional effects, and the physical effects that can affect sexual response.

Cover image of 'A guide to life after oesophageal/gastric surgery - oesophagectomy and gastrectomy'

A guide to life after oesophageal/gastric surgery - oesophagectomy and gastrectomy (November 2017)

The Oesophageal Patients Association

This booklet has been written for people who have had an oesophagectomy or a gastrectomy. It describes the operation and recovery, how the surgery may affect eating and drinking, and the possible problems that may arise, such as dumping, gastric retention, acid regurgitation, or diarrhoea. It has advice on life after surgery; for example, driving, sleep, relationships, and going back to work, and concludes with suggestions for small meals, snacks and nutritious drinks.

Cover image of 'Pain and myeloma'

Pain and myeloma (June 2017)

Myeloma UK

This Infoguide aims to help you understand what pain is, the different types of pain and causes of pain in myeloma patients. It provides information on the different methods of pain treatment available, and gives guidance on non-medical strategies that may help to improve your pain and make living with pain a little easier.

Cover image of 'What doesn’t kill you, makes you stronger'

What doesn’t kill you, makes you stronger (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

“You’ve got cancer” – three little words that can change your life. “What Doesn’t Kill You, Makes You Stronger” is the honest, straight-from-the-heart account of one woman’s experience of hearing these three words. Right from the start, it follows every step of this journey – and it IS a journey – the tears and laughter, the ups and downs and everything in between. There is loads of information available that give you the facts about what it’s like to be diagnosed with cancer, what happens next, what the options are for treatment and a how to have a life alongside a cancer diagnosis. Most of these are written by those who have never had cancer. Not many of them share the emotional and psychological effects that being diagnosed have. This book does. It talks about the real side effects of chemo, the strange things you crave or can’t stand, the powerful friendships that develop and the fierce spirit within, which is determined to beat cancer. It’s not a “poor me” story……it’s a frank and honest account that has one purpose – to help other people who find themselves with a cancer diagnosis, to show them that what they are thinking and feeling is “OK”, that they aren’t alone and that it’s ok to have a laugh. “What Doesn’t Kill You, Makes You Stronger” – very frank, very honest and very true. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Head, face and neck lymphoedema'

Head, face and neck lymphoedema (November 2016)

Lymphoedema Support Network

Lymphoedema of the head, face and neck may occur following surgery or radiotherapy. This leaflet describes the treatment and management options, including manual lymphatic drainage, simple lymphatic drainage, exercise, skin care, positioning and compression. Psychological distress is briefly considered.

Cover image of 'Coping with the psychological effects of illness. Strategies to manage anxiety and depression'

Coping with the psychological effects of illness. Strategies to manage anxiety and depression (2015)

Sheldon Press

Sudden, severe ill health comes as a shock and presents several challenges, most notably, loss of confidence. Suddenly people are afraid to take exercise, have sex or even go to the shops. Their entire self-image takes a battering, and this roller-coaster of uncertainty often leads to anxiety and depression. This book looks at the learning curve involved in sudden and chronic illness, and explores key ways to build psychological resilience during this time of challenge. Whether it concerns cancer, heart disease, diabetes, or a mental health condition, it explores the common psychological issues that arise when someone’s usual health and routine are disrupted, and discusses the impact of illness on relationships and family. Drawing on CBT techniques, it offers practical self-help strategies to help deal with peoples changed expectations of themselves, and with the related lifestyle changes. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Emotional and social aspects of lymphoedema'

Emotional and social aspects of lymphoedema (September 2015)

Lymphoedema Support Network

This leaflet explores the emotions that people with lymphoedema may experience, such as anger, depression or anxiety. It also considers body image and personal, sexual and social relationships, and concludes with advice on coping with the changes that lymphoedema can bring.

Sorry, no publications found.
Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 7 days a week, 8am-8pm