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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 226

Cover image of 'Feel more like you. Expert advice on caring for your skin, nails and hair during cancer treatment'

Feel more like you. Expert advice on caring for your skin, nails and hair during cancer treatment (September 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet explains how certain cancer treatments can cause changes to your appearance. It is for people who have had changes to their skin, nails and hair because of cancer treatment. It gives advice on how to manage these changes to help you feel more like you again. We hope it helps you deal with some of the questions or feelings you may have. 

Cover image of 'Hair loss'

Hair loss (September 2019)

Lymphoma Action

Some lymphoma treatments can cause your hair to thin or fall out. Knowing what to expect and what you can do about it may help you cope with losing your hair. This factsheet has advice on how to care for your hair and scalp during and after treatment. It also tells you about some of the options you may wish to consider until your hair grows back. 

Cover image of 'Pampering therapy'

Pampering therapy (April 2019)

Look Good...Feel Better

Information about Look Good Feel Better with details of workshop locations in the UK.

Cover image of 'Breast cancer and hair loss'

Breast cancer and hair loss (January 2018)

Breast Cancer Care

Many people will lose either some or all of their hair as a result of treatment for breast cancer. For some, this is the most distressing side effect of treatment. Some people find that being prepared for hair loss before it occurs helps them cope better when it happens. This booklet explains how you may lose your hair and the effect it can have. It looks at how to care for your hair and scalp during and after treatment and the different headwear you may want to try, including wigs and headscarves. It includes step-by-step guides to tying headscarves and tips on recreating the illusion of eyebrows and eyelashes. The final part of the booklet discusses what usually happens when your hair grows back and how to look after it.

Cover image of 'Coping with hair loss'

Coping with hair loss (October 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about hair loss. It is for anyone coping with changes to their hair during and after cancer treatment. It explains how cancer treatment may affect your hair, how to prepare for and cope with hair loss, and what to expect after treatment finishes.

Cover image of 'Pretty sick. The beauty guide for woman with cancer. How to look your best when you feel your worst'

Pretty sick. The beauty guide for woman with cancer. How to look your best when you feel your worst (2017)

Piatkus (Little, Brown Book Group)

The ultimate resource to looking your best during and after cancer treatment, from a veteran beauty industry insider. Like many women who receive the shattering diagnosis of cancer, Caitlin Kiernan was concerned about her health and her future, but also about how the treatment would affect how she felt and looked - would she lose her hair? Would she lose her nails? How would she look after a double mastectomy? But unlike other women who battle cancer, Kiernan has spent her entire career as a beauty editor, beauty director (most recently for Life & Style Weekly), and now beauty producer. As someone who works in the public eye and in the fashion industry, Kiernan had to quickly learn how to look her best even when she was feeling her worst. So she called on her list of extensive contacts and beauty insiders - from hair professionals to top medical doctors (at institutions like Memorial Sloan Kettering and Mt Sinai Hospital) to style mavens and even celebrities (including Wendy Williams and Hoda Kotb) - to gather the best and most useful beauty tips for cancer treatment. The result is Pretty Sick: the ultimate guide to beauty during (and after) cancer treatment, covering skin care, hair care (and wig shopping), nail care, makeup, an explanation of breast cancer surgical options, style advice for life post mastectomy, and much, much more. Illustrated with charming line drawings and peppered with advice from celebrities and cancer survivors, Pretty Sick will be a welcome and trusted resource during treatment, helping women to look their best even when they don't feel their best. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Look good...feel better confidence kit. A guide to managing the appearance-related effects of cancer treatment'

Look good...feel better confidence kit. A guide to managing the appearance-related effects of cancer treatment (2015)

Look Good...Feel Better

This booklet and accompanying DVD has information and advice about make-up, skincare, hand and nail care, wig selection and cutting, scarf tying and head coverings to help manage changes in personal appearance caused by treatment for cancer.

Cover image of 'Help with the cost of cancer in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland'

Help with the cost of cancer in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland (March 2020)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about getting benefits and other financial help if you are affected by cancer in England, Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland. It is for anyone living with cancer and their family, friends and carers. It explains the types of financial help you could get and how to claim this support. It also tells you who to contact for further help, including Macmillan’s welfare rights advisers.

Cover image of 'My chemotherapy journey'

My chemotherapy journey (2020)

Ken Harwood

The author was diagnosed in 2019 with a low-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma and this is his day-by-day account of his chemotherapy journey over a six month period.

Cover image of 'The circle. A young adult's journey with cancer'

The circle. A young adult's journey with cancer (2020)

Independently published

Cancer. It's a word associated with an unrivalled sense of dread, but also one that unites us in a variety of painful and unexpected ways. I, like many others, did my best to remain ignorant of the unpleasant truths surrounding this illness until at just the age of 19 I was diagnosed with Ewing's Sarcoma, a rare bone cancer. This compiled journal is a record of my experiences as part of a group that can often be underrepresented in the public's approach to cancer. Follow me from the beginning to the end of this at times dire journey, where I do my best to learn what I can to share with the world about how we can better fight this illness on the psychological plain. If you or a loved one are in a similar situation, or perhaps you're looking to simply satisfy morbid curiosity, then partake in a unique account on one young man's experience with one of humanity's greatest killers. (Author) 

Cover image of 'Dear life. A doctor's story of love and loss'

Dear life. A doctor's story of love and loss (2020)

Little, Brown Book Group

As a specialist in palliative medicine, Dr Rachel Clarke chooses to inhabit a place many people would find too tragic to contemplate. Every day she tries to bring care and comfort to those reaching the end of their lives and to help make dying more bearable. Rachel's training was put to the test in 2017 when her beloved GP father was diagnosed with terminal cancer. She learned that nothing - even the best palliative care - can sugar-coat the pain of losing someone you love. And yet, she argues, in a hospice there is more of what matters in life - more love, more strength, more kindness, more joy, more tenderness, more grace, more compassion - than you could ever imagine. For if there is a difference between people who know they are dying and the rest of us, it is simply this: that the terminally ill know their time is running out, while we live as though we have all the time in the world. Dear Life is a book about the vital importance of human connection, by the doctor we would all want by our sides at a time of crisis. It is a love letter - to a father, to a profession, to life itself. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Healthy eating. Nutritional guidelines for people with a colostomy'

Healthy eating. Nutritional guidelines for people with a colostomy (June 2019)

Colostomy UK

Advice on diet and nutrition following a colostomy.

Cover image of 'Parastomal hernias'

Parastomal hernias (September 2019)

Colostomy Association

This leaflet explains what a parastomal hernia is, the causes, the complications and problems it can cause and the treatment options. It has practical hints and tips for managing a parastomal hernia and for reducing the risk. Includes the personal experiences of four ostomates.

Cover image of 'Living with skin lymphoma'

Living with skin lymphoma (April 2019)

Lymphoma Action

This factsheet has advice and support to help you manage symptoms and to live well with skin (cutaneous) lymphoma. It overs the following topics: Alleviating itching and dryness; Minimising skin irritation; Treating an infection; Controlling your temperature; Managing pain; Improving the appearance of your skin; Day-to-day life.

Cover image of 'Getting care and planning for the future. Information for LGBTQ+ people affected by terminal illness, and their family and friends'

Getting care and planning for the future. Information for LGBTQ+ people affected by terminal illness, and their family and friends (November 2019)

Marie Curie

Living with a terminal illness and getting the best care and support can be challenging for everyone. We all have individual needs and will have different experiences. Being LGBTQ+ may mean that you have specific concerns or questions about getting the care and support you need. In this booklet, we explain the care and support that’s available. We also answer questions you might have, such as how you can plan ahead and make decisions for the future.

Cover image of 'Self-employment and cancer'

Self-employment and cancer (April 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about coping with cancer while you are self-employed or running a small business. It is for sole traders, freelancers, contractors or those running a micro business (one that employs fewer than 10 people). It includes information and guidance about: how treatment might affect your work; things to consider when making decisions about your business; talking to clients or customers about your situation; getting support with your business or personal finances.

Cover image of 'The two faces of cancer'

The two faces of cancer (2019)

Troubador Publishing

Half of the UK population will receive a diagnosis of cancer at some point in their lives and most people will know someone who has been affected by this complex disease. Drawing from her three personal experiences with cancer alongside her professional experience as a counsellor and personal coach, Rebecca Brazier chronicles her journey through diagnosis, treatment and recovery. When talking about cancer we tend to think about the physical side effects of treatment. Although medical advances are saving and extending lives, less consideration is given to the emotional and psychological trauma which cancer creates. The Two Faces of Cancer describes and addresses this trauma and explores why cancer is difficult to recover from both personally and within society. It describes the devastation and powerful feelings cancer created for Rebecca and how she channelled these to create a meaningful life. It also draws from Rebecca's professional knowledge to analyse the emotional and psychological impact of cancer and to suggest routes to recovery. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Tommy v cancer. One man’s battle against the Big C. (Again).'

Tommy v cancer. One man’s battle against the Big C. (Again). (2019)

Independently published

In March 2016, cancer attacked me for the first time. I was diagnosed with inoperable, stage four throat cancer and underwent intensive courses of both chemotherapy and radiotherapy which left me extremely weak and vulnerable to infection. As a result, I contracted double pneumonia and sepsis and was rushed into intensive care where my family was told that, unless I began responding to treatment, I had approximately two hours left to live. Thankfully, I pulled through and set off upon the long road to recovery. It was the hardest thing I've ever faced but - eventually, in the summer of 2017 - I was declared cancer free.For a few months, at least. In January 2018, a routine scan found the cancer had returned - and had now spread to my lungs. Bugger. "Tommy v cancer: Round Two" continues the story of my fight to survive the 'Big C', salvage what remained of my career, and support my terrified family through yet another battle of life and death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'For Freddie. A mother’s final gift for her son'

For Freddie. A mother’s final gift for her son (2019)

Michael O'Mara Books Ltd

The inspirational memoir from the founder of the You, Me and the Big C podcast, Rachael Bland. Courageous and life-affirming, this is a mother's final gift to her son. In 2016, beloved broadcaster and journalist Rachael Bland was diagnosed with cancer. Shortly afterwards she made the brave decision to share her story, and she spoke with beautiful poignancy through her blog and podcast, You, Me and the Big C. Having been told that she only had a matter of months left to live and writing this in what were sadly her final days, Rachael brings her warmth, courage and humour to the page in this heart-warming and heart-breaking story. Part memoir, part advice, For Freddie beautifully encapsulates the grace and fearlessness in which Rachael lived her life. This is her legacy and an incredible final gift to her son. (Publisher)

Cover image of '365 days past the traffic lights'

365 days past the traffic lights (2019)

Independently published

How do you cope with the death of a parent at 24 years old? The time when you’re somewhere between independence and reliance on parents, figuring out who you are and what you want to do, and trying to maintain friendships and a social life when your world is crumbling around you and no one understands. Rose Taylor straddled two worlds; living in both a picturesque English village and an adventure filled Hollywood lifestyle in Los Angeles. But in late 2017 life hurtled her into a new realm, one that was immersed in medical settings and put her life on hold. In this compelling and emotive memoir, Rose Taylor explores the first 365 days following the death of her father. She writes frankly about the moment of diagnosis, the experience of becoming a carer for a parent and sheds light on the psychological and physical symptoms of bereavement. The book takes the reader between London, Atlanta and Los Angeles weaving together the experience of grieving and a narrative of reconciling memory and loss. The book ultimately offers a voice for grieving young adults, with the aim of showing them they are not alone. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Chemo companion. A friendly guide to chemotherapy and a collection of chemo stories'

Chemo companion. A friendly guide to chemotherapy and a collection of chemo stories (2019)

Rethink Street Publishing

This clear, concise book helps you to understand what chemotherapy may be doing to your body, your mind and your life. It gives you useful tips and information, practical advice and reassurance, and it reminds you that you are not alone. Part 1 is a brief GUIDE to the time before, during and after chemotherapy. It includes planning and preparation, common side effects, your thoughts and feelings, food and exercise, work and money issues, how you might feel after treatment, and where to find further help and support. Part 2 is a collection of STORIES based on true, real-life experiences of chemotherapy. Each one is candid and honest and shared in the spirit of kindness and friendship. Including an overly complicated salad, finding long lost relatives, flying paper aeroplanes, writing to new online pen-pals, and tips for friends who don't know what to say. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'How long have I got? The story of a ‘terminal’ cancer patient'

How long have I got? The story of a ‘terminal’ cancer patient (2019)

Independently published

Suitcases filled with medication. Life and death situations. Multiple organ removal. Risking everything to stay alive just one more day. And people still moan to you when they have a cold. Welcome to the life of a ‘terminal’ cancer patient. In January 2016 thirty-year-old Fi Munro was diagnosed with stage four ovarian cancer. Told from day one that her cancer was incurable and ‘terminal’, Fi faced unimaginable pain, heartache and suffering as the life she’d dreamed of was suddenly pulled away from her. Yet in the wake of this news she did not wallow. Instead she discovered a remarkable inner strength, resilience and, above all, a very dark sense of humour. Years later and she is still here, having outlived, in her opinion, two ‘very unreasonable’ prognoses. How Long Have I Got? is her inspiring story. Honest, open and often tear-jerking this is everything you wanted to know - and some stuff you’ll want to forget - about living with cancer and an important reminder that we are all terminal. Reading this will change your life forever. Fi Munro is a multi-award-winning researcher, author, blogger, speaker and mentor recognised internationally for her presentations and articles on her journey and the importance of holistic health. She has been featured in two BBC documentaries, in TV and radio shows, and in newspaper and magazine articles across the globe. Today she is healthier and happier than ever before and believes cancer saved her life. She is currently training to be a shaman and is excited for what the future holds. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Between living and dying. Reflections from the edge of experience'

Between living and dying. Reflections from the edge of experience (2019)

Birlinn Limited

In 2017 broadcaster Rev. Ruth Scott was diagnosed with an aggressive form of cancer. As rounds of treatment and hospital stays came to dominate her life, she was forced to step back from her busy routine. She found this experience disconcerting at first but gradually came to realise that it gave her a remarkable opportunity to view life from a different perspective. This book was written during the time of her treatment, what she came to call ‘a gap year in the shadow of death’. More than a memoir of wards and tests, it offers a series of reflections that draw on Ruth’s broad experience and deep thinking. In her life and work she had an innate gift for connecting with people, for being there with them. The book captures this essence in its brave, resonant, and always compassionate exploration of being alive. Living with uncertainty, letting go of control, and allowing for doubt, she writes, can make room for mystery and bring about understanding beyond rational limitations. Drawing on a lifetime of reading and on poems and songs gifted by friends and fellow-patients, Ruth Scott outlines the things that really matter, poignantly and powerfully drawing the reader on her journey. Ruth died in February 2019, but, as Richard Holloway writes, she has left us ‘a map to guide us through our own lives’. 

Cover image of 'The cancer roller coaster. How to manage the emotional and mental impact'

The cancer roller coaster. How to manage the emotional and mental impact (2019)

Librotas

Two days after celebrating her 50th birthday, Juliette Chan had an unexpected birthday present: bowel cancer. Luckily, they caught it early, but once the treatment was over, the psychological side-effects surfaced. For many months, Juliette was adrift and felt lost. It seemed that everything in her life was up for review and she struggled to gain clarity about what to do next. There were many questions, such as: When will I feel normal again; Why am I not as motivated as before; Will the cancer come back; Why am I mentally exhausted. It took her a while to realise that the cancer had caused a whole load of losses: loss of trust in her body, self-image as a fit and healthy person, energy, confidence, motivation, income and much more. And that’s when the penny dropped; she was grieving. Cancer not only involves coping with the physical disease and treatment – it also means experiencing and dealing with hidden losses that will affect how you view and live your life. Every time you experience a loss, there is an emotional response: grief. Most people only associate grief with bereavement but it is in fact a natural reaction to any and all losses, including the hidden and intangible losses you face with cancer. Anyone who has or has had cancer, as well as their family and friends, will experience grief – because life has changed. This can show up as anger, frustration, anxiety, ‘depression’, fear, sadness, for example. If left unchecked or suppressed, grief will affect your mental health and emotional wellbeing. It doesn’t have to be like this; it is possible to take care of the emotional and mental impact of cancer and to live well. In her easy, relaxed style of writing, Juliette explains the emotional and mental impact of cancer and highlights the limitations of Mindfulness and positive thinking. She has also included a workbook with simple practical exercises that help to release the psychological side-effects and provide clarity. You can also read the candid stories of eight others who faced cancer: Robert describes his initial feelings of shock on diagnosis and how others helped him to cope, whereas Meena recounts going it alone; Petra shares how she continued to run throughout her treatment, and Susan talks movingly about the seemingly endless decision-making from diagnosis onwards; Mary, Tony and June recount their unique experiences of the same cancer

Cover image of 'Finding your way. Caring for yourself while caring for someone else'

Finding your way. Caring for yourself while caring for someone else (2019)

Rippling Print

If you are caring for someone, this book is for you. It contains everything that helped Verran to find his way as he cared for his wife Karen, from her initial diagnosis to her death 8½ years later. “This is so beautiful, so helpful right now.” Rachel, caring for her mother. Whenever he discovered a new way to do something, or a new way of thinking, or being that worked for him, he wrote it down in a notebook. Page by page, that notebook became this book - a collection of reminders that helped him time and time again, and especially when he was struggling. “This book connects to the human in all of us, a hand to hold, and a guiding light.” Lee, caring for his wife. The thoughts within this book still help Verran today, and he now offers it to you in the hope that it will help you too. He invites you to try whatever catches your eye, whatever makes sense to you in your heart. Also to notice whenever you find a new way that works for you, and to add your own reminders. It is Verran’s hope that these thoughts will help you to adapt, and to grow, and to find your way. Your way to truly be with those that you care for, to nurture your own peace of mind, and to create the space you need for you. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Bereavement and stem cell transplant'

Bereavement and stem cell transplant (December 2018)

Anthony Nolan

Losing someone close after a stem cell transplant can be devastating. Although it is a challenging treatment, there is often a lot of hope that it will give a long-term remission. Bereavement is a personal experience and there is no right or wrong way to grieve. This guide was developed with people who lost a partner or family member after a stem cell transplant. The post-transplant experience leading up to the bereavement can leave you with questions and emotions; this guide aims to help you identify those emotions and answer some of your questions. 

Cover image of 'Personal organiser'

Personal organiser (April 2018)

Breast Cancer Care

This organiser is for anyone with secondary (metastatic) breast cancer to keep a record of symptoms, side effects, and details of appointments. It is part of the Secondary breast cancer information pack.

Cover image of 'Clinical trials for lymphoma'

Clinical trials for lymphoma (December 2018)

Lymphoma Action

This booklet aims to explain what clinical trials are and what they might involve. It also describes some recent trials of importance for people with lymphoma. It includes the personal experiences of four people who took part in clinical trials for lymphoma.

Cover image of 'Younger people with bowel cancer: a guide for the under 50s'

Younger people with bowel cancer: a guide for the under 50s (August 2018)

Bowel Cancer UK

This booklet is for people who have been diagnosed with bowel cancer under the age of 50. It gives an introduction to how bowel cancer can affect your body, your emotions, your relationships and your everyday life. It includes the personal experiences of people who have been diagnosed with bowel cancer at a younger age. There are links to more detailed information, contact details for organisations, and a glossary of the medical words used.

Cover image of 'My records'

My records (August 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet works alongside the information in "The cancer guide". It includes tools for you to use to: keep notes to show your healthcare team; write down appointment times; write down contact details; keep track of how you are feeling. It is included in the Macmillan organiser and available to order separately.

Cover image of 'Secondary breast cancer information pack'

Secondary breast cancer information pack (April 2018)

Breast Cancer Care

This pack is for anyone with secondary breast cancer. It may also be useful for family, friends, or carers. It contains information that may be useful from diagnosis throughout treatment and care. The pack has four main parts. 1. The first part of the pack explains what secondary breast cancer is, looks at treatments and side effects, and has information about monitoring and coping with the physical effects of your condition. 2. The second part is called Your needs and concerns with secondary breast cancer. This looks at how to make sure your needs are met, from emotional and practical needs to concerns about relationships, work and finances, and health and wellbeing. 3. Personal organiser to help you record symptoms or side effects from treatment, which you can take with you to hospital appointments. You can also record appointment details and names and contact details of people involved in your care. 4. A small booklet called Planning ahead: choices and decisions about the end of life is for if and when you want to start thinking about these things. 

Cover image of 'Managing the late effects of breast cancer treatment'

Managing the late effects of breast cancer treatment (October 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Information for women who experience side-effects that continue for six months or longer after treatment, or delayed late effects that begin months or years after treatment. 

Cover image of 'The carer's bible'

The carer's bible (2018)

Souvenir Press

This accessible and detailed guide includes practical tips, checklists for best practice, descriptions of their experience from a wide range of carers that addresses solutions to common problems, and expert advice on how to deliver compassionate and dignified care to older people. Uniquely, Amanda Waring also provides support and guidance for the carer, how to maintain energy and commitment, how to recognize signs of compassion fatigue and where carers can get help if they need it. The Carer's Bible is an invaluable, inspiring guide to how to give your loved one the best possible care while addressing the anxieties that all carers suffer. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Dear cancer. A diary of hope to help you through'

Dear cancer. A diary of hope to help you through (2018)

Trapeze (Orion)

Renowned as a much-loved and highly respected BBC journalist, Victoria Derbyshire has spent 20 years finding the human story behind the headlines. In 2015 she found herself at the heart of the news, with a devastating breast cancer diagnosis. With honesty and openness, she decided to live out her treatment and recovery in the spotlight in a series of video diaries that encouraged thousands to seek diagnosis and help. Victoria has kept a diary since she was nine years old and in this book she shares her day to day experiences of life following her diagnosis and coming to terms with a future that wasn't planned. From the moment she woke up to find her right breast had collapsed, to telling her partner and children, through to mastectomy and chemotherapy. From wearing a wig to work and hiding it from her colleagues, to the relief and joy of finishing treatment before immediately flying to Glasgow to present a debate on the European Referendum. y sharing her story, she became the person that mums, daughters, sisters, husbands, boyfriends and family members contacted to thank as they tried to find ways to cope with their own and their loved ones' prognosis, and needed to know that they were not alone. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A moment of grace. A story of love and loss'

A moment of grace. A story of love and loss (2018)

Ebury Press (Penguin Random House)

Patrick Dillon and Nicola Thorold were together for twenty-eight years. Patrick was an award-winning architect and writer and Nicola a leading figure in theatre, awarded an OBE for her contribution to the arts at London’s Roundhouse. Their two children were almost grown-up. Life was good. And then, in May 2015, Nicola was diagnosed with leukaemia. After several rounds of treatment, a bone marrow transplant and many waves of recovery and decline, she died thirteen months after her diagnosis. Six months later, at Christmas, Patrick started to write. A Moment of Grace is the searing, tender account of Patrick’s life with Nicola and her illness, and his life after her loss. But it is more than a story of illness and unbearable grief: it is a book of memory, of home, of family. It is a tale of the transfiguring power of love. Heartbreaking, life-affirming and truly unforgettable, A Moment of Grace is one man’s journey to find life after his wife’s death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Everything happens for a reason and other lies I've loved'

Everything happens for a reason and other lies I've loved (2018)

SPCK Publishing

London-born Kate Bowler, a thirty-five year-old professor at the school of divinity at Duke, had finally had a baby with her childhood sweetheart when she began to feel jabbing pains in her stomach. She lost thirty pounds, guzzled antacid, and visited doctors for three months before she was finally diagnosed with Stage IV colon cancer. As Kate navigates the aftermath of her diagnosis, she pulls the reader into her life and her history - affectionately filled with a colourful retinue of friends, mega-church preachers, parents, and doctors - and shares her irreverent, laser-sharp reflections on faith, friendship, love, and death. She wonders why suffering makes her feel like a loser and explores the burden of positivity. Trying to relish the time she still has with her son and husband, she realizes she must cure her habit of 'skipping to the end' and planning the next move. An historian of the American Prosperity Gospel (the creed of the megachurches that promises believers a cure for tragedy, if they just want it badly enough) Kate finds that she craves these same 'outrageous certainties'. Why is it so hard to surrender when she knows there are no spiritual guarantees? (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A new kind of normal'

A new kind of normal (2018)

Self-published

They say there’s a book in all of us, but I doubt I would ever have written one had it not have been for my diagnosis of breast cancer in 2011. ‘A New Kind of Normal' is the story of my life up to and moving on from that moment. Growing up in the 60's, working through the 70's and 80's, juggling a career in TV and radio while bringing up three children and surviving two divorces. From the moment I knew what a bra was, I’d wanted breasts: I even crafted a pair of blue plasticine boobs for myself, as nature made me wait until I was 15 for breasts of my own! Through cancer I lost them both, and with the chemotherapy; all my hair, my fingernails, and more worryingly, a sense of whom I was. My hair grew back, as did my fingernails, but I still struggled with my identity. What I’ve written isn't a diary, nor a self-help guide, and it's not just about cancer. I’ve taken a really good look at the little girl I was and the woman I grew into, and why I went to such lengths to try and claw back some of what cancer had taken from me - it's not everyone's way I appreciate, and it’s been an interesting exercise trying to ascertain why it was mine! I’ve been honest, open, and meticulous when it comes to detail, as I firmly believe that if you take away the mystery, you can take away some of the fear. But there’s a lot to laugh about here too, as luckily I’ve always been able to see the funny side of a situation, preferring that to the occasional overwhelming despair I felt. In this book I've tried to move the disease away from the medical professionals and the hospitals, and to bring it into the day to day, because that's where it sits. Over the last seven years I’ve come to realise that the ripple effect of cancer is far reaching, affecting not just those of us living with it but everyone around us. 'A New Kind of Normal' gives an insight into my relationship with my then partner, now husband; my children and their reaction to my illness, my family and friends, my work colleagues, people who wrote to me, and the professionals who cared for me; everybody reacts differently. Breast cancer assaults your femininity - the treatment is tough and the surgery brutal.  It isn't easy, but it is possible, and I'd like to feel this book may be a source of comfort to anyone who's life is touched by breast cancer; maybe even help them to find their 'New Kind of Normal'. There are many things in life we may have to give up on, but hope is not one of them. (P

Cover image of 'P.S. I have cancer. Wrestling melanoma and falling in love'

P.S. I have cancer. Wrestling melanoma and falling in love (2018)

Poetry Space Ltd

Mark Sims, a young doctor was diagnosed with advanced skin cancer just before his 27th birthday. This is the story of his 23-month wrestle with the disease, his passion to raise awareness and funds for vital research and how he found love quite unexpectedly, while working through his bucket list. Sadly, Mark died on January 19th 2017. His book is being published posthumously. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'In our own words. Parents talk about life after their child has died of cancer'

In our own words. Parents talk about life after their child has died of cancer (January 2018)

CLIC Sargent

This booklet has been written for families whose children have cancer. It includes sections on the circles of grief, changes in grief over time, how relationships are affected, the dual process model of coping with grief, remembering your child, spirituality, and dealing with other people's responses. The text is interspersed with quotes from people whose child has died.

Cover image of 'Radiation diaries. Cancer, memory and fragments of a life in words'

Radiation diaries. Cancer, memory and fragments of a life in words (2018)

Fentum Press

After a life of reading and writing, what does it feel like to be deprived of both, to be thrown back only on what’s in your head? The literary snippets that emerge into Todd’s consciousness during a month of radiation are sometimes apt, often ludicrous. They draw her back into childhood in Wales, Bermuda, Ceylon when literature functioned as friend and escape, to her unquiet past in sixties Ghana, then America at the dawn of the rights movements. Her father, nearing 100, is caught in the same ‘hospital-land’: both learn the selfishness of sickness and both respond by telling stories. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Being Adam Golightly: one man's bumpy voyage to the other side of grief'

Being Adam Golightly: one man's bumpy voyage to the other side of grief (2018)

Short Books

The cruel early death of his wife Helen tears up the script of Adam Golightly's middle-class, middle-aged existence. Miserably single, outnumbered by his kids and haunted by life's screaming fragility, he recounts his fight back against the hand of fate. This irreverent and frank memoir follows Adam's snakes-and-ladders journey through his grief in the year following his wife's death, as he struggles with small town tongue wagging, the trauma of teenage bra shopping and online dating anarchy.Adam's is the biggest mid-life crisis anyone could face and as he starts to build a new, alternative life for himself and his children, he shows not just how to survive bereavement but how to be transformed by it. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Love and remission: my life, my man, my cancer'

Love and remission: my life, my man, my cancer (2018)

Trigger

In her mid-twenties, balancing a stable job and a partying lifestyle, Annie was also on the hunt for a man. She wanted to find Mr Right, get married, buy a house, and live the life she'd always wanted. But then one day, she found a lump ... Breast cancer. The two words that would derail Annie's life. Suddenly she realised how short her life had been, and the very idea of finding love seemed impossible. As her hair fell out, and her social life crumbled, her mental health deteriorated. She began to question if she would actually survive. Struggling with an identity crisis and worryingly low moods, she wondered if she'd ever be able to live the normal life that had been within her reach only months earlier. Love and Remission tells the tale of a young woman in search of love and mental wellbeing. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Milkshakes and morphine. A memoir of love and loss'

Milkshakes and morphine. A memoir of love and loss (2018)

Square Peg (Vintage)

This is a singular memoir: an excavation of mother love, a candid account of the agonies, and absurdities, of the cancer experience, and a doggedly optimistic paean to life. When Genevieve Fox finds a lump in her throat, she turns up for the hospital diagnosis in a party frock and fancy hair. I can’t have cancer, she thinks. I’ve done my hair. But there is another reason she can’t countenance cancer. Genevieve was orphaned to it at the age of nine. Genevieve’s story weaves together past and present as she recalls her rackety, unconventional childhood, while also facing the spectre of being lost to her young boys. Yet, she confronts her treatment with the same sassy survival instinct that characterised her childhood misadventures. Through an extraordinary alchemy, Genevieve takes life’s precariousness and turns it on its head. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The neuroscientist who lost her mind. A memoir of madness and recovery'

The neuroscientist who lost her mind. A memoir of madness and recovery (2018)

Bantam Press (imprint of Transworld Publications)

All we think, feel and dream, how we move, if we move, everything that makes us who we are, comes from the brain. We are the brain. So what happens when the brain fails? What happens when we lose our mind? In January 2015, renowned neuroscientist Barbara Lipska's melanoma spread to her brain. It was, in effect, a death sentence. She had surgery, radiation treatments and entered an immunotherapy clinical trial. And then her brain started to play tricks on her. The expert on mental illness - who had spent a career trying to work out how the brain operates and what happens when it fails - experienced what it is like to go mad. She began to exhibit paranoia and schizophrenia-like symptoms. She became disinhibited, completely unaware of her inappropriate behaviour. She got lost driving home from work, a journey she did every day. She couldn't remember things that had just happened to her. Small details like what she was having for breakfast became an obsession, but she ignored the fact that she was about to die. And she remembers every moment with absolute clarity. Weaving the science of the mind and the biology of the brain into her deeply personal story, this is the dramatic account of Dr Lipska's own brilliant brain gone awry. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Gone in the morning. A writer’s journey of bereavement'

Gone in the morning. A writer’s journey of bereavement (2018)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

An exploration of death, bereavement and grief. This first hand account gives Geoff Mead's experience of responding to the loss of his wife from a brain tumour. Giving insight into the grieving process and how Geoff learned to manage his grief, this book will offer hope to anyone experiencing something similar. After coming to the realisation that mourning is a conscious process, to which we can apply creativity, passion and intelligence, Geoff explored the unknown territory of bereavement through his writing. The book shows how artful practice, such as writing, can help to make sense of our experience and navigate the wreckage of grief. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'All that followed. A story of cancer, kids and the fear of leaving too soon'

All that followed. A story of cancer, kids and the fear of leaving too soon (2018)

Mirror Books

With four children (three of them triplets!) and a relationship break-up to contend with, some things get a little lost in the mix. Like symptoms. Emma Campbell bravely and honestly offers heartfelt thoughts on what happens when cancer becomes an unwelcome guest at an already crowded party. She shares her own terror and pain, mixed with the heartwarming and unexpected. The extraordinary kindness of people and the gritty detail of battling a life-threatening illness, all while being a single mum to four children. She opens up about her angels and demons, losing and then finding love again, a constant fear of death mixed with the joy and relief of living, the anxiety of cancer returning - then facing it when it does. This book has grown from Emma's blog Me And My Four. Eager to share with her followers in more detail, the secrets, the fears, the triumphs and the terrors that she faces each day, in a life as unpredictable as your own... (Publisher)

Cover image of 'All the time we thought we had'

All the time we thought we had (2018)

Polygon (Birlinn Imprint)

How do you start a new life when the person you love is about to die? At the age of thirty-six, Gordon Darroch's wife was diagnosed with breast cancer. It was a devastating blow just as he, and their two children with autism, were preparing to move to her native Holland. Eighteen months later, as their plans seemed to be back on course, came the second blow: Magteld was terminally ill and possibly had only a few months to live. As her health rapidly deteriorated, they became caught up in a race against time to get a dying mother home and give their children a future in a country they hardly knew. How could they build a new life in the midst of grief and loss? How would their two sons adjust to such enormous changes? And what would remain of Magteld once she was gone? All the Time We Thought We Had is a story of love and loss and a meditation on grief and memory. It's about how events shape our lives and how we cope with them. And it raises important questions about what we value in life and the legacies we leave behind. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A funny thing happened on the way to chemo. A rather unusual memoir'

A funny thing happened on the way to chemo. A rather unusual memoir (2018)

Short Books

"Cancer is not a laughing matter, as I was told by a cross German lady from Dortmund when I showed her this journal. She had herself had breast cancer and is right of course; there are lots of things that are not fun about cancer, most of them unavoidable. I was therefore as surprised as the next person to realise that a huge amount of funny things happen on the way to chemo, or indeed on the way to most places, and that once you get your eye in, you completely forget to be scared..." This is not just an educational book about cancer, although it is certainly safe to give to cancer patients as a cheerful present. More importantly, it sheds new light on why Kim Kardashian is worth Keeping Up With, what playlists to make for MRI scans, the truth behind the legend of Medea, bikini etiquette on a deserted beach, what to do with a glut of rainbow chard, what an Oscar-winner should say in an acceptance speech, how to deal with cold-callers selling life insurance, and what to wear on a March Against Menopause (layers, obviously)... (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The unremarkable man. My encounter with cancer'

The unremarkable man. My encounter with cancer (2018)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

In this, his first venture into the literary world, Terry Barry has succeeded in producing a distinctive, perceptive and truly heartwarming story about his battle with life-threatening illness and disease, drawing on medical records and diary entries and written in an engagingly immediate style, skilfully and sympathetically addressing the physical, psychological and emotional turmoil that affected him, his family and friends, prompting him to re-evaluate his recollection of past events and determining his aspirations and goals for the future (Publisher).

Cover image of 'Death and the elephant. How cancer saved my life'

Death and the elephant. How cancer saved my life (2018)

Unbound

12 June 1995. On his twenty-eighth birthday, Raz Shaw was a directionless gambling addict doing a telesales job that was eating up every trace of what soul he had left. The next day he would be diagnosed with stage 4 sclerosing mediastinal non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the large cell type. As he tells it, cancer saved his life. He was given the all-clear in March 1996, and stopped gambling for good that April. After a year away recuperating, he turned his back on the highly paid job that had devoured him and re-assimilated himself into the world of theatre that had once made him feel so alive. It took him a long time to realise quite how much these recoveries were bound up with one another – now he is ready to tell his story. Death and the Elephant is a memoir of living through and beyond illness and addiction. Blessed with the ability to find humour even in life’s darkest moments, Raz charts his struggles with irreverence and unflinching perspective. This is his story, but it’s also a universal one – an honest, funny, sometimes raw, and often inappropriate glimpse into the mind of a young man dealing with a life-threatening illness in the only way he knows how: by laughing in its face. (Publisher)

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