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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 226

Cover image of 'Chemo companion. A friendly guide to chemotherapy and a collection of chemo stories'

Chemo companion. A friendly guide to chemotherapy and a collection of chemo stories (2019)

Rethink Street Publishing

This clear, concise book helps you to understand what chemotherapy may be doing to your body, your mind and your life. It gives you useful tips and information, practical advice and reassurance, and it reminds you that you are not alone. Part 1 is a brief GUIDE to the time before, during and after chemotherapy. It includes planning and preparation, common side effects, your thoughts and feelings, food and exercise, work and money issues, how you might feel after treatment, and where to find further help and support. Part 2 is a collection of STORIES based on true, real-life experiences of chemotherapy. Each one is candid and honest and shared in the spirit of kindness and friendship. Including an overly complicated salad, finding long lost relatives, flying paper aeroplanes, writing to new online pen-pals, and tips for friends who don't know what to say. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'How long have I got? The story of a ‘terminal’ cancer patient'

How long have I got? The story of a ‘terminal’ cancer patient (2019)

Independently published

Suitcases filled with medication. Life and death situations. Multiple organ removal. Risking everything to stay alive just one more day. And people still moan to you when they have a cold. Welcome to the life of a ‘terminal’ cancer patient. In January 2016 thirty-year-old Fi Munro was diagnosed with stage four ovarian cancer. Told from day one that her cancer was incurable and ‘terminal’, Fi faced unimaginable pain, heartache and suffering as the life she’d dreamed of was suddenly pulled away from her. Yet in the wake of this news she did not wallow. Instead she discovered a remarkable inner strength, resilience and, above all, a very dark sense of humour. Years later and she is still here, having outlived, in her opinion, two ‘very unreasonable’ prognoses. How Long Have I Got? is her inspiring story. Honest, open and often tear-jerking this is everything you wanted to know - and some stuff you’ll want to forget - about living with cancer and an important reminder that we are all terminal. Reading this will change your life forever. Fi Munro is a multi-award-winning researcher, author, blogger, speaker and mentor recognised internationally for her presentations and articles on her journey and the importance of holistic health. She has been featured in two BBC documentaries, in TV and radio shows, and in newspaper and magazine articles across the globe. Today she is healthier and happier than ever before and believes cancer saved her life. She is currently training to be a shaman and is excited for what the future holds. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Between living and dying. Reflections from the edge of experience'

Between living and dying. Reflections from the edge of experience (2019)

Birlinn Limited

In 2017 broadcaster Rev. Ruth Scott was diagnosed with an aggressive form of cancer. As rounds of treatment and hospital stays came to dominate her life, she was forced to step back from her busy routine. She found this experience disconcerting at first but gradually came to realise that it gave her a remarkable opportunity to view life from a different perspective. This book was written during the time of her treatment, what she came to call ‘a gap year in the shadow of death’. More than a memoir of wards and tests, it offers a series of reflections that draw on Ruth’s broad experience and deep thinking. In her life and work she had an innate gift for connecting with people, for being there with them. The book captures this essence in its brave, resonant, and always compassionate exploration of being alive. Living with uncertainty, letting go of control, and allowing for doubt, she writes, can make room for mystery and bring about understanding beyond rational limitations. Drawing on a lifetime of reading and on poems and songs gifted by friends and fellow-patients, Ruth Scott outlines the things that really matter, poignantly and powerfully drawing the reader on her journey. Ruth died in February 2019, but, as Richard Holloway writes, she has left us ‘a map to guide us through our own lives’. 

Cover image of 'The cancer roller coaster. How to manage the emotional and mental impact'

The cancer roller coaster. How to manage the emotional and mental impact (2019)

Librotas

Two days after celebrating her 50th birthday, Juliette Chan had an unexpected birthday present: bowel cancer. Luckily, they caught it early, but once the treatment was over, the psychological side-effects surfaced. For many months, Juliette was adrift and felt lost. It seemed that everything in her life was up for review and she struggled to gain clarity about what to do next. There were many questions, such as: When will I feel normal again; Why am I not as motivated as before; Will the cancer come back; Why am I mentally exhausted. It took her a while to realise that the cancer had caused a whole load of losses: loss of trust in her body, self-image as a fit and healthy person, energy, confidence, motivation, income and much more. And that’s when the penny dropped; she was grieving. Cancer not only involves coping with the physical disease and treatment – it also means experiencing and dealing with hidden losses that will affect how you view and live your life. Every time you experience a loss, there is an emotional response: grief. Most people only associate grief with bereavement but it is in fact a natural reaction to any and all losses, including the hidden and intangible losses you face with cancer. Anyone who has or has had cancer, as well as their family and friends, will experience grief – because life has changed. This can show up as anger, frustration, anxiety, ‘depression’, fear, sadness, for example. If left unchecked or suppressed, grief will affect your mental health and emotional wellbeing. It doesn’t have to be like this; it is possible to take care of the emotional and mental impact of cancer and to live well. In her easy, relaxed style of writing, Juliette explains the emotional and mental impact of cancer and highlights the limitations of Mindfulness and positive thinking. She has also included a workbook with simple practical exercises that help to release the psychological side-effects and provide clarity. You can also read the candid stories of eight others who faced cancer: Robert describes his initial feelings of shock on diagnosis and how others helped him to cope, whereas Meena recounts going it alone; Petra shares how she continued to run throughout her treatment, and Susan talks movingly about the seemingly endless decision-making from diagnosis onwards; Mary, Tony and June recount their unique experiences of the same cancer

Cover image of 'Finding your way. Caring for yourself while caring for someone else'

Finding your way. Caring for yourself while caring for someone else (2019)

Rippling Print

If you are caring for someone, this book is for you. It contains everything that helped Verran to find his way as he cared for his wife Karen, from her initial diagnosis to her death 8½ years later. “This is so beautiful, so helpful right now.” Rachel, caring for her mother. Whenever he discovered a new way to do something, or a new way of thinking, or being that worked for him, he wrote it down in a notebook. Page by page, that notebook became this book - a collection of reminders that helped him time and time again, and especially when he was struggling. “This book connects to the human in all of us, a hand to hold, and a guiding light.” Lee, caring for his wife. The thoughts within this book still help Verran today, and he now offers it to you in the hope that it will help you too. He invites you to try whatever catches your eye, whatever makes sense to you in your heart. Also to notice whenever you find a new way that works for you, and to add your own reminders. It is Verran’s hope that these thoughts will help you to adapt, and to grow, and to find your way. Your way to truly be with those that you care for, to nurture your own peace of mind, and to create the space you need for you. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Bereavement and stem cell transplant'

Bereavement and stem cell transplant (December 2018)

Anthony Nolan

Losing someone close after a stem cell transplant can be devastating. Although it is a challenging treatment, there is often a lot of hope that it will give a long-term remission. Bereavement is a personal experience and there is no right or wrong way to grieve. This guide was developed with people who lost a partner or family member after a stem cell transplant. The post-transplant experience leading up to the bereavement can leave you with questions and emotions; this guide aims to help you identify those emotions and answer some of your questions. 

Cover image of 'Personal organiser'

Personal organiser (April 2018)

Breast Cancer Care

This organiser is for anyone with secondary (metastatic) breast cancer to keep a record of symptoms, side effects, and details of appointments. It is part of the Secondary breast cancer information pack.

Cover image of 'Clinical trials for lymphoma'

Clinical trials for lymphoma (December 2018)

Lymphoma Action

This booklet aims to explain what clinical trials are and what they might involve. It also describes some recent trials of importance for people with lymphoma. It includes the personal experiences of four people who took part in clinical trials for lymphoma.

Cover image of 'Younger people with bowel cancer: a guide for the under 50s'

Younger people with bowel cancer: a guide for the under 50s (August 2018)

Bowel Cancer UK

This booklet is for people who have been diagnosed with bowel cancer under the age of 50. It gives an introduction to how bowel cancer can affect your body, your emotions, your relationships and your everyday life. It includes the personal experiences of people who have been diagnosed with bowel cancer at a younger age. There are links to more detailed information, contact details for organisations, and a glossary of the medical words used.

Cover image of 'My records'

My records (August 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet works alongside the information in "The cancer guide". It includes tools for you to use to: keep notes to show your healthcare team; write down appointment times; write down contact details; keep track of how you are feeling. It is included in the Macmillan organiser and available to order separately.

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