Publications directory

Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 7 days a week, 8am-8pm

The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 226

Cover image of 'Cancer is my teacher'

Cancer is my teacher (2014)

Quartet Books

Every two minutes someone in the UK is diagnosed with cancer. Lucy O'Donnell was herself three years ago. Cancer is My Teacher is her story, describing unflinchingly how she has turned the disease into a positive experience - and how you can do the same. Lucy's approach is determined but disciplined, clinical but also holistic. By addressing the physical, emotional, and spiritual aspects of cancer, Lucy covers the whole spectrum of the disease - including how to tell the family, the dos and donts of communicating with a patient, the side-effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy - and gives practical advice on how to keep looking your best and even what to pack for surgery. Cancer is My Teacher offers guidance for anyone in the early stages of diagnosis, in treatment or trying to readjust afterwards. It also helps family and loved ones to understand what they're going through - and, above all, carries a message of hope for everyone touched by cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Dancing with cancer (and how I learnt a few new steps)'

Dancing with cancer (and how I learnt a few new steps) (2014)

O-Books (John Hunt Publishing)

The late Diana Brueton had never been ill and on being diagnosed with metastatic bowel cancer in August 2007 she stepped into a parallel world of waiting rooms, treatments, friends and family who supported - or fled - as life became both exquisitely precious and terrible. Dancing with Cancer is a human drama, a ride on the rollercoaster of hope and despair and, as the gradients became gentler, a journey through meditation and creativity to wisdom and acceptance. Diana was a gifted writer and artist who worked for the BBC, The Bristol Cancer Help Centre and as a teacher and art therapist. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The c list. Colons, clinics, chemo and (quite a lot of cake): how I survived bowel cancer'

The c list. Colons, clinics, chemo and (quite a lot of cake): how I survived bowel cancer (2014)

Watkins Publishing

When facing with advanced cancer, the first thing this author did was look for other books from long time survivors of stage 4 bowel cancer to give her something to hold on to. Finding none, she wrote her own. With a wicked, taboo-breaking sense of humour and a gift for practicality, she shares her experiences and the lists she made to gain some control over what quickly became an unpredictable life. Both funny and poignant, she vividly describes the absurd situations she finds herself in from a brutally flippant surgeon to dating after cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The diary of a mother, her son and his monster'

The diary of a mother, her son and his monster (2014)

Empire Publications

Caroline Burch experienced every parent's worst nightmare when her son Elliot was diagnosed with cancer when he was just six months old. To document her experiences she kept a diary detailing the ups and downs of her son's treatment and the emotional anguish of their situation from diagnosis to remission. Ten years later, and with Elliot happily recovered from the condition that threatened his life, Caroline looks back at the traumatic months when there appeared to be no end in sight to the misery. Caroline's story is proof that there is life after cancer and this book is a tribute to the tireless work of the individuals who help parents and their children emerge from their nightmare. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'I've been there. 50 tips on coping with lymphoma'

I've been there. 50 tips on coping with lymphoma (2014)

Tips for coping with lymphoma from a patient.

Cover image of 'Probably nothing. A diary of not-your-average nine months'

Probably nothing. A diary of not-your-average nine months (2014)

Viking

A moving, funny and inspiring graphic memoir by a woman who discovered she had cancer whilst she was pregnant: 'I am glad. And then sad. (But) Mum's bought me a furry snood. 'Ooh, lovely!'' At 31, Matilda Tristram was 17 weeks pregnant and looking forward to having her first baby. Then she discovered she had cancer. This touching and hilarious graphic memoir, which is never morose or self-pitying, starts at the moment Matilda was diagnosed and ends when her course of chemotherapy finishes in October 2013. Recording the awkward conversations, the highs and lows of treatment, the mixed blessings of receiving 'Get Well' cards, and the reality of still having to queue too long for croissants, Matilda captures her experiences with characteristic style and warmth. Along the way she cherishes the small details of life, and learns not to sweat the big things. Her beautiful and boisterous son was born without complications and is reliably keeping her up most nights. Charming, witty and uplifting - this unique and beautifully illustrated book will leave you cherishing the good things in life, and ready to face your own challenges. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Travels with Cookie. Narrowboat cruising with a cat'

Travels with Cookie. Narrowboat cruising with a cat (2014)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Between 2004 and 2006, David Thomas experienced a series of disasters in his life, culminating in being told that he only had a short time left to live. Rather than sinking into despair as many people would, he decided to fulfil his lifelong dream of living on a canal boat, while he still could. So he bought a narrowboat, LadyRiverMouse (an anagram of 'Live Your Dreams') with a view to spending the rest of his limited life cruising the canals and rivers of England. Naturally, he had to take the love of his life with him – a rather bad-tempered fluffy white prima donna of a cat called Cookie. Cookie was an indoor cat who had rarely been outside, never mind living on a boat, where according to David dogs are usually the pets of choice. Would it work out? David didn't know, but as he put it, “I wasn't going anywhere without my beloved Cookie”. The remainder of the book is an account of the few years David spent travelling through the waterways of his native land. Many people live on boats; few cruise as extensively as David did – to London, along the Thames, up to Wales, then tackling the wild and often desolate rivers of North West England. A beginner to boating when he started, David learned much as time went on, mainly by having numerous – and often hair-raising - adventures. So did Cookie, who contrived to get lost, fall in the water on a number of occasions, and generally use up most of her cat's nine lives. Finally David met Helen, a helicopter instructor, writer, and – most importantly – cat lover. They fell in love, and David's life began to change yet again, leading to the eventual sale of LadyRiverMouse and a new life in the Peak District for David and Cookie. David knows about boating, has an eye for detail, and is also an astute observer of his fellow men and women, both on and off the waterways. Therefore this book will clearly be of interest to those who have ever travelled on the canals or done any other boating, anyone who loves travel of any type, or simply the armchair traveller who enjoys reading about others' adventures. But “Travels With Cookie” is more than just another boating or travel book. It is a tale of bereavement and divorce, of terminal illness and despair, and finally of romance, a seemingly miraculous cure, and a new life. Hence it should appeal to anyone who likes human interest stories of any type. And of course – as Cookie herself would tell you if she could speak - it i

Cover image of 'Laryngectomy is not a tragedy. An introduction to pharyngeal speech'

Laryngectomy is not a tragedy. An introduction to pharyngeal speech (2013)

Cancer Laryngectomee Trust

This updated edition contains the original chapters written by Sydney Norgate in 1989 plus additional material by Dr Nicola Oswald on current speech methods and future developments. It will provide help and encouragement to all laryngectomy patients and their families. It is full of practical advice and information, as well as reassurance. The author, who had himself had his larynx removed, wrote from personal experience of the problems caused by the loss of normal speech, and describes the method of learning to use substitute pharyngeal speech. Written in a straightforward, humorous style and illustrated with cartoons 'Laryngectomy is not a Tragedy' has proved to be a valuable source of advice and inspiration to all those who face this operation. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Worms on parachutes. Mystical allies in my cancer survival'

Worms on parachutes. Mystical allies in my cancer survival (2013)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

I was diagnosed with Triple Negative Breast Cancer on the 15th June 2007. I remember that day so vividly. It will be ingrained in my memory forever as it is the day I felt my perfect little world crumble. I remember hearing those terrifying words, “I’m sorry it’s cancer” and falling to pieces. I hollered as my mind froze and my body went numb. I was frightened, felt incredibly vulnerable and my greatest fear stared me in the face. I could potentially die, and leave behind my two beautiful daughters and a husband who is also my best friend, and the person I love to have at my side. I’m pleased to report those initial feelings softened as time passed. Now it is important to share my story to give hope, encouragement and inspiration to others faced with a life-threatening illness. I believe that sharing stories helps to inspire those who are touched by cancer. You seek hope reassurance that treatments can be very successful today. Breast Cancer isn’t the only illness I have overcome. I had a near death experience in Africa as a child, I was an accident-prone youngster and the sickly one in my family. I was diagnosed with Hodgkin Disease, a cancer of the lymphatic system at 16, yes, I’m very greedy one cancer wasn’t enough. Fingers crossed cancer will leave me alone now. I will not give in! However, it is quite possible that radiation treatment for that cancer caused my breast cancer 20 years later. Yet from all the mishaps I experienced, I walk away truly blessed that people who entered my life as strangers ended up making the greatest impact on my life. What makes Worms On Parachutes special is that I was inspired to write after receiving outstanding medical care. Therefore, it deals with relationships from medical professionals to family and friends so openly and honestly. It is an insightful read that I believe will be helpful and supportive to anyone experiencing cancer today in whatever role you play. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'My journey'

My journey (2013)

Penguin

In July 2009, Jim Stynes was diagnosed with cancer and given less than a year to live. The diagnosis caught him by surprise - he was 42, healthy, fit - and he didn't have time for illness: he was director of a foundation for young people, president of Melbourne Football Club, father of two primary school-aged kids, husband of Sam. Knowing his odds weren't good, but with so much to lose, Jim put everything he had into trying to beat the disease. He was well equipped to beat the odds - he'd been getting the most out of himself in every aspect of life since his childhood in Dublin. Jim's ability to use mind over matter and his will to succeed gave him two extra years on the prognosis. He had more than 25 tumours removed from his brain and stomach, and defied expectations time and time again. This book is Jim's legacy. Unflinching in its detail, Jim talks about what he found out about himself when things were at their worst - about what really counts when you're stacking it all up. It's a moving, inspiring story of a life lived fearlessly. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Emotional support through breast cancer. The alternative handbook'

Emotional support through breast cancer. The alternative handbook (2013)

Radcliffe Publishing

This compassionate guide presents an array of new perspectives on the emotional effects of breast cancer and includes many personal testimonies from women who have been diagnosed with this disease. Written by a breast cancer survivor and practising psychologist, it shares practical ideas to help support sufferers at all stages, be it at diagnosis, during treatment or during life after the initial treatments are over. The concise, easy-to-read format includes exercises to develop an acceptance of thoughts and feelings, whilst the individual accounts validate the multitude of emotions felt by sufferers. It is a must for all breast cancer patients and sufferers, their families and friends. Its real-life approach, using first hand accounts, is also highly recommended for all health and social care professionals wanting a fresh approach to managing the emotional impacts of breast cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Surviving and thriving. My encounter with cancer'

Surviving and thriving. My encounter with cancer (2013)

David Grant

This is a story about fighting the "inevitable". Diagnosed with a Grade 4 Glioblastoma Multiforme in 2005 with medical expectations of 12/15 months, I am living life to the full. Don't accept average survival stats, ask instead, "just what is possible". Good luck. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Expected death at 03:45. A love story'

Expected death at 03:45. A love story (2013)

Julia Dansie

Julia Dansie writes about her experiences of looking after an ex-partner and friend who had breast cancer. It is written as a diary covering 20 months during which the two central characters travel an extraordinary journey, unimagined at the time of inception.

Cover image of 'My left boob. A cancer diary'

My left boob. A cancer diary (2013)

Book Guild Publishing

Diagnosed with breast cancer in her fifties, award-winning actress and glamour girl-about-town Sally Farmiloe-Neville decided to keep a diary. This is the frank and honest account of her fight to beat the tumour within, retain as much of her left breast as possible - and carry on working meanwhile. Filled with helpful advice to fellow sufferers based on her own experiences, needle-phobic Sally documents her treatment as she goes through the horrors of chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy, helped by a healer, a hypnotherapist and a special diet. When her trademark 'big' hair falls out she reveals how she coped by getting ‘Crystal’, a long blonde NHS wig that wowed every man she met. Her family and friends - including many famous household names - are by her side throughout, but many of them have fought their own battles with the big C and Sally documents their stories, too. Always upbeat, never sorry for herself, this is the courageous tale of one woman's struggle to regain her health. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Living with cancer. The year when even the dog got cancer'

Living with cancer. The year when even the dog got cancer (2013)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

How do you live with cancer, day by day, month by month, year by year? With medical advances, this is what many of us are now doing. In the UK alone, by 2020, it is estimated 50% of people will experience cancer either as a patient or a carer. And this is being repeated all around the world. Living with cancer - The year when even the dog got cancer gives an inspirational insight into how one family dealt with four cases of cancer being treated at the same time over one year. Written as a memoir by the carer who can only watch and be supportive as her loved ones go through the various treatments and their side effects, it brings into reality the true emotional cost of "living with cancer". It does so with heart-warming honesty and a huge amount of humour. It will make you cry. It will make you giggle, but more than anything, it will give you hope. Living with Cancer - The Year When Even The Dog Got Cancer will show you that this frightening illness can be survived and the joy of life can go on. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'I felt a right one... and now I feel a right one again'

I felt a right one... and now I feel a right one again (2013)

Matador

“Whilst in the bath I lay back and take a look at my 'bigger than I would really like' body and focus on my chest. My G cup breasts are not difficult to miss, even with my poor eyesight, but what I see makes me sit up straight. It looks like my right nipple is 'not on straight'. I put my glasses on and have a really good look, then start to gently feel my whole right breast. I feel the left one for good measure and can definitely detect a lump on the right side...” This is the true story of Karen Tighe, an ordinary woman, and her journey through discovery, diagnosis, treatment and reconstruction. Amusing and thoughtfully written, it is particularly helpful in describing the physical, emotional and psychological processes that a patient can go through - and how that impacts upon their life, and that of their family. Karen's aim in writing the book was to make cancer less frightening and anyone who is either suffering from cancer, or knows someone who is, will find the book to be of great help. Karen Tighe is donating the profits from her book to St Luke's Hospice and Breast Cancer Care. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cellmates. Our lessons in cancer, life, love and loss'

Cellmates. Our lessons in cancer, life, love and loss (2013)

Saraband

I'm Rose. John and I shared nearly eight years of our lives together. For the last three years of our relationship cancer anchored us together. That's not as grim as it might sound. This is our story. A story of how two ordinary people live with the diagnosis, the check-ups, the disappointments, the relief, the questions, the answers, the operations, the recovery, the emergencies, the denial, the acceptance, the anger, the pain, the loss, the love, the fear, the frustration - and the happiness. Shortly before he died, John made Rose promise to share their story - to tell what they had learned, practically and emotionally, and convey the hope they found even in the darkest of times. He had discovered her hidden stash of letters and diary entries, which she'd been writing to keep herself sane, neither censoring nor intending them to be read. The result is an astonishing, searingly honest, real-time account that reveals our profound capacity for love and how the human spirit can endure the most harrowing of tests to emerge dauntless, flying free. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Gift of time'

Gift of time (2013)

Constable

An heartbreakingly honest and deeply moving memoir in the words of the son, his wife and his mother of her battle with cancer, from one of the UK's best loved travel writers. When his mother Joan was diagnosed with terminal cancer, Rory MacLean and his wife Katrin took her into their home. For five months, as their life fragmented and turned inward, they fought both to resist and to accept the inevitable. Each gave vent to their emotions in different ways, but all three kept a diary. Heartbreakingly honest and deeply moving, Gift of Time is the story of those days, in the words of a son, his wife and his mother. Woven together into a poignant meditation on life and death, they illuminate the courage and dignity of one woman who confronted what we all must face. Threaded through with wisdom and guilt, anger and acceptance, the story is punctuated by a family wedding and the hope of new life, by bin-bags of old letters and books rediscovered, by the end of winter and the first signs of spring. Powerful, raw and urgent, this slender volume is above all a celebration of life. Capturing every moment of beauty and pain it acknowledges that what survives all of us is love. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Mum's way'

Mum's way (2013)

Simon & Schuster UK

Angie and Ian were childhood sweethearts, Angie adored kids and, as one of eight children himself, Ian was only too happy to have as many as they could. After their marriage they had three sons in quick succession. But then, aged just thirty one, Angie was diagnosed with breast cancer and the couple had to accept they might not be able to have any more. Five years on, though, with Angie well again they went on to have five more. But in 2007, Angie had a shadow on her lung and it was the return of the original breast cancer she thought she had beaten. It seemed the disease had returned to tear their world apart again. Though Ian searched tirelessly for cures, Angie practised acceptance. She wouldn't live to see her children grow up. Raising eight children would be a big job for any couple; to raise them alone, without their mother, an almost Herculean feat. But this was exactly what Angie wanted Ian to be able to do. So in the last months of her life, Angie compiled a list of 'rules' to guide Ian in the future, and put him on an intensive training course, so he could learn all the skills he would need. She taught him how to make her special chicken curry, how to soothe away their hurts, pack their lunchboxes with all their favourites and do all the little things she'd done for them so unthinkingly. And Ian knew he wasn't just doing this for the children. He was doing it so his beloved wife could be comforted by knowing that he had the tools to bring their children up her way. Finally, inevitably, came the hardest task of all. Angie, the job done, had to find the courage to let them go, and Ian and the children the courage to carry on without her. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The end of your life book club'

The end of your life book club (2013)

Two Roads

When New York publisher Will Schwalbe’s mother was diagnosed with cancer, he went with her to her treatments. To while away the time in the hospital they distracted themselves with talk of the books they’d read and shared and recommended and, in Will’s case, sometimes pretended to read. But while you might pretend to a bookseller you’ve read a book you don’t pretend to your mother who is dying of cancer. So they read and re-read and explored that particular bond of books they’d always shared. Thus was born a very special book club with just two members: a mother and a son. The ones they choose range from classic to popular, from fantastic to spiritual, and we hear their passion for reading and their love for each other in their intimate and searching discussions. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Eek! My mummy has breast cancer'

Eek! My mummy has breast cancer (2013)

Club Books

When my mum was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012 it literally rocked my world, the world of my family, and the world of our friends. I searched everywhere looking for information about breast cancer that teenagers could understand and relate to - I couldn't find any. I decided if I couldn't find any books about breast cancer that I, as a teenager, could understand, I would have to write my own book from my experience on dealing with a loved one who has been diagnosed with cancer and in the hope others could find useful that I struggled to find originally. This is what I put together and for all teenagers and young people out there I hope you find this book useful, helpful and most of all: comforting. Emma Sutherland. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The hare who lost her hair'

The hare who lost her hair (2013)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

This one-of-a-kind story is a message of hope for young children and families who are undergoing chemotherapy or any difficult struggle. Without words like cancer and chemo, the kid-friendly tale follows a brave hare on her courageous journey to overcome illness. A mysterious, healing stream offers the potential to get well, but there are surprising side effects that will challenge the hare's strength and determination. This book is about believing wishes can come true even in the most extreme circumstances. Ideal for early stage cancers due to the message of survival. Perfect for pairing with honest discussions about your personal situation. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The pink moon lovelies. Empowering stories of survival'

The pink moon lovelies. Empowering stories of survival (2013)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

The Pink Moon Lovelies are members of the Facebook group Beyond the Pink Moon, named after Nicki Boscia Durlester’s memoir that intimately chronicles her journey after a breast cancer diagnosis. Nicki created the group to provide an active forum for discussion to raise awareness about the BRCA gene and breast and ovarian cancer. She never dreamed her homespun story would travel around the globe and Beyond the Pink Moon would become a support group for people from all walks of life coming together to lift each other up with inspiration, humor, faith and love. With Lovelies in Australia, Canada, England, France, Ireland, Israel, Mexico, Namibia, New Zealand, Singapore, Slovakia, South Africa, Sweden, Tasmania and the USA, Nicki, a BRCA2 survivor, and fellow moderator, Melissa Johnson Voight, a BRCA1 previvor, whose journey of steadfast faith and courage of conviction is included in this book, have encouraged their members to tell their stories with one goal in mind, to save lives. With a Foreword written by renowned breast surgeon, Dr. Kristi Funk, this riveting collection of 50 stories includes: the unflinching account of Barbie Ritzco, a United States Marine who kept silent about discovering a lump in her breast in order to deploy with her unit to Afghanistan, putting her country before her health, the moving story of Ally Durlester, Nicki’s daughter, a 25 year old BRCA2 previvor who will undergo prophylactic surgery to try to avoid the same fate as her mother, grandmother and six great-aunts who all had breast, ovarian or fallopian tube cancer, the frustrating story of Erika Grogin Lange, an Israeli Lovely and mother of five, whose nagging symptoms of fatigue, nausea and bloating went undiagnosed for months until she heard the shocking news that she had Stage III ovarian cancer, and the unpredictable journey of Susan Long Martucci, a two-time breast cancer survivor, disease free for 13 years, blindsided by another diagnosis. She is the beacon of hope who coined the term Pink Moon Lovelies. Each story is compelling and has an important message to impart. The Pink Moon Lovelies, Empowering Stories of Survival concludes with the story of the incomparable May Smith, the 32 year old South African Lovely who left a legacy of extraordinary courage, grace and love. Hers was a life well lived. When May sadly passed away on July 22, 2012 from breast cancer she left the Pink Moon Lovelies with one final message filled with wisdom and advice beyond her years. H

Cover image of 'The dog, the chick and the reindeer. The story of a family living with cancer'

The dog, the chick and the reindeer. The story of a family living with cancer (2013)

Apollo Publishing

In 2004 my mother asked us to donate to the Macmillan team in lieu of a present. It is ironic that she then developed and survived endometrial cancer in 2006 and was diagnosed with and died from ovarian cancer in 2012, especially as the Macmillan team supported us to keep her in the home she loved right to the end. The story tells of the effects of both cancers on Mum and the rest of the family. Naturally there were sad times and some excruciatingly painful and stressful times but there were also some funny and touching moments. Audrey, Mum's sister was coincidentally diagnosed with oesophageal cancer and at one point they were in different wards at opposite ends of the same hospital. The day we were told of Mum’s diagnosis, we wheeled her down to sit with Audrey and they held hands and hugged, one in a wheelchair and the other hooked up to all kinds of machinery. Audrey died thirteen days after mum. There is no doubt that my mother loved her family - she had nearly ninety children, grandchildren, great grandchildren and great, great grandchildren, both biological and adopted; whilst the story is written from my perspective, I wasn't the only one to suffer and it could easily have been written by thirty or forty other people. When I found out mum had a terminal illness I made up my mind to take her back to her home, which is the only place she wanted to be; some people thought I was mad but we had a dedicated team of family and were lucky to be further supported by her GP, the DN’s and Macmillan team. I organised weekly rotas to ensure 24 hour care: The book tells how we coped with this and of my panic the day I found out the Macmillan support team didn’t have any sitters for the following week. It also portrays the “normal” things we did along as we rode our six year emotional roller coaster, such as going on holidays and dealing with other family crises. The last twelve months before her death were intolerable. The last six months a nightmare, and the ten weeks between diagnosis and her passing were hell on earth but we had some laughs, we cried and we sang songs. A few weeks before she died, as my daughter entered the room Mum was playing a game with my younger grandchildren, throwing the tiny purple chick to each of them in turn and giggling along with them, its tail flashing as though it too was enjoying the fun. I initially wrote the book to help me deal with my own grief, stress and feelings of guilt that I was glad she had finally let g

Cover image of 'Tallulah tumour, friend or foe. A personal insight into a battle with a brain tumour'

Tallulah tumour, friend or foe. A personal insight into a battle with a brain tumour (2012)

Memoirs Publishing

Fiona Goldsby has emerged triumphant from the terrifying experience of suffering a serious brain tumour. She found very little written material was available to help her in her battle, so she has written Tallulah Tumour, Friend or Foe? to help others dealing with a similar diagnosis. It is intended to provide information about what the patient may expect, with hints and tips to deal with the various side effects. The information in the book will not only be helpful to patients but to caregivers and family members. And as you may guess from the title, there is plenty of humour as well. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Love for now'

Love for now (2012)

Impress Books

The sun has just popped out, after a heavy shower; the washing line a string of pearls. It's time to live. On Valentine s Day, 2006, Anthony Wilson was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a cancer of the lymphatic system. He was 42. In this journal of the days that followed he contemplates love, family and mortality alongside celebrations of Peter Osgood, Ivor Cutler and cooking chicken while listening to funk. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Living with cancer: endings and beginnings'

Living with cancer: endings and beginnings (2012)

Dorset County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Six people (two men, four women) who had recently been treated for cancer at Dorset County Hospital met with writer Rosie Jackson for some creative writing workshops in October 2012. This booklet is their personal response to the experience of being diagnosed with cancer and going through treatment and its aftermath.

Cover image of 'Riddance'

Riddance (2012)

Worple

On Valentine's Day, 2006, Anthony Wilson was formally diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a cancer of the lymphatic system. 'Beginning with what happened', the poems in Riddance chart the progress of his treatment for this disease, from initial diagnosis to the uncertain territory of remission. Even more essentially, they recover and celebrate all that is most fundamental and affirming about the act of living. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Table for one, Sir?'

Table for one, Sir? (2012)

Austin Macauley

In this deeply poignant and personal memoir, John Flint recounts the experience of his wife Patricia s diagnosis with cancer, her death, and his efforts to readjust to life afterwards. John uses his own experiences to explore some of the wider issues about how society responds to terminal illness, death, and widowhood. But, in a book that is touching, warm, and wise, John focuses on some of the realities of each stage from caring for a terminally ill loved one to learning to live as a widower. In doing so, John provides an insight into the real emotions and experiences of a carer and widower. He provides thoughts on the practicalities of what to expect from experiences such as the first Christmas as a widower, going on holiday alone, and the well-meant comments of others; and, in a life where the tears are only an eyelid away, he provides ideas on how to deal with them. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Mum's list. A mother's life lessons to the husband and sons she left behind'

Mum's list. A mother's life lessons to the husband and sons she left behind (2012)

Penguin

On her deathbed, Kate Greene's only concern was for her two little boys, Reef and Finn, and her loving husband, Singe. She knew she'd be leaving them behind very soon. Over her last few days, Kate created Mum's List. The couple talked and cried together as she wrote her thoughts and wishes down, trying to help the man she loved create the best life for their boys after she was gone. It wasn't the first time Singe and Kate had faced the spectre of death. Four years earlier, doctors discovered a large lump in baby Reef's abdomen. Kate, pregnant with Finn, was so distressed that she gave birth dangerously early. Both boys pulled through, but afterwards Kate received the diagnosis that every woman dreads (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Mortality'

Mortality (2012)

Atlantic Books

During the US book tour for his memoir, Hitch-22, Christopher Hitchens collapsed in his New York hotel room to excoriating pain in his chest and thorax. As he would later write in the first of a series of deeply moving Vanity Fair pieces, he was being deported 'from the country of the well across the stark frontier that marks off the land of malady.' Over the next year he underwent the brutal gamut of modern cancer treatment, enduring catastrophic levels of suffering and eventually losing his voice. Mortality is the most meditative piece of writing Hitchens has ever produced; at once an unsparingly honest account of the ravages of his disease, an examination of cancer etiquette, and the coda to a lifetime of fierce debate and peerless prose. In this eloquent confrontation with mortality, Hitchens returns a human face to a disease that has become a contemporary cipher of suffering. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The life and death of an unknown celebrity'

The life and death of an unknown celebrity (2012)

Janus Publishing Company Ltd

There was less of her now, but I loved her more. In this raw personal account of tragedy told from a male perspective, the author shares with us what must be one of the most devastating things in anyone’s life when he loses his wife and the mother of his two young children to breast cancer. Darren then has to face telling his children that their mother is never coming back as he learns to adjust to his new life and shake hands with his sorrow. To watch a loved one deteriorate so quickly is very disturbing. To stand by feeling helpless as the cancer spreads through the body, causing it to die, is heartbreaking. Shoe obsessions, screaming, sympathy sex and Starbucks were all part of his journey of self-pity as he loses himself in idle distractions. Through this honest account, Darren shows us that there is hope, once the searing pain of grief has subsided and memories of a past become subdued as he is set on the path to acceptance and happiness. A world without love is a lonely place, so it is comforting to know that love can blossom again - even after the worst and longest winter (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Go with the flow'

Go with the flow (2012)

Quartet Books

Diagnosed with breast cancer, internationally renowned photographer Gemma Levine determined to use her skill and connections to write a book about her experience that would be a companion, a resource, an aide and, finally, a practical guide to the incredible journey all cancer patients must travel if they are to regain control of their life. Medical practitioners, researchers, support staff, therapists, even make-up experts and a cordon bleu cook have gladly contributed accounts that, added together, provide a book of bountiful insights and comfort. A unique series of pool exercises which Gemma created for herself are included as an appendix. It is, in the end, overcoming the fear of and guilt about the suddenness of the diagnosis and the myriad unknown factors in coping with the treatment of cancer where this remarkable book will prove its worth. The skill and artistry of Gemma's black and white photographs contribute an additional, dynamic quality that captures the humanity and, ultimately, the love so many people involved in the treatment and help of cancer patients bring to bear. This book is, above all, a message of practical hope. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer survivors club'

The cancer survivors club (2012)

CKG Ventures

The Cancer Survivors Club is a collection of truly inspirational, uplifting and assuring survival stories. These poignant personal accounts from normal people, demonstrate an extraordinary determination to survive against the odds. It proves with survival rates doubling, anything is possible. Unfortunately cancer affects everyone; worldwide there are around 12.7 million new cases diagnosed each year. Every two minutes someone in the UK is diagnosed with cancer. The Cancer Survivors Club has an excellent mix of stories, from the most common cancer, to the rarest. Some of the cancer types mentioned are; brain, bowel, breast, pancreatic, spinal, testicular, leukaemia, nasal and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Included in the book are a number of Chris Geiger's cheerful newspaper columns, including his humorous account of a prostate examination, getting sunburnt on a crowded beach and his Guinness World Record article. The Cancer Survivors Club will provide anyone touched by cancer with hope, strength and encouragement. Each story is written from the survivors or families own perspective, offering a very warm, friendly style of writing. This relaxed and sometimes humorous approach makes The Cancer Survivors Club an informative, positive and inspirational book that the reader will be able to relate to and gain strength from. Many cancer patients and those around them find the gruelling treatments very hard to cope with, they often feel very alone and isolated. This book allows anyone affected by the disease to focus their attention on surviving, ultimately making it their goal to share their story in future editions. Most patients have times when they feel they are the only person going through cancer treatment and have nobody to talk with. It is also a very difficult time for people close to the patient who have no previous experience in dealing with this disease. The Cancer Survivors Club is a must-read for the millions of cancer patients worldwide and a book of great support for their family and friends. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The yellow world. Trust your dreams and they'll come true'

The yellow world. Trust your dreams and they'll come true (2012)

Particular Books (Penguin Imprint)

Albert Espinosa never wanted to write a book about surviving cancer, so he didn't. He wrote a book instead about the Yellow World. What is the yellow world? The yellow world is a world that's within everyone's reach, a world the colour of the sun. It is the name of a way of living, of seeing life, of nourishing yourself with the lessons that you learn from good moments as well as bad ones. It is the world that makes you happy, the world you like living in. The yellow world has no rules; it is made of discoveries. In these 23 Discoveries Albert shows us how to connect daily reality with our most distant dreams. He tells us that 'losses are positive', 'the word 'pain' doesn't exist', and 'what you hide the most reveals the most about you'. Albert Espinosa has won several battles with death, which is why his stories are so full of life. He is powerful because he never gives up. And as a last resort he bargains: he swapped a leg and a lung for his life. He has learnt how to lose in order to win. He's hyperactive and prefers losing sleep to losing experiences. If you want to tell him something it has to be very good or told very fast. He loves to provoke people but he does it to make provocations seem normal. His greatest hope is that after you have read this book you will go off in search of your yellow world. Albert Espinosa is a bestselling author. At the age of thirteen, Albert was diagnosed with cancer, an event that changed his life forever. When he was fourteen, his left leg had to be amputated. At sixteen his left lung was removed, and when he was eighteen part of his liver was taken out. After ten years in and out of hospitals, when he was finally told that he had been cured of the disease, he realised that his illness had taught him that what is sad is not dying, but rather not knowing how to live. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The topic of cancer'

The topic of cancer (2012)

Jessica Richards

The Topic of Cancer takes a completely new look at the disease which currently affects around one in every 200 people at some point in their lives. It is first and foremost, a manual, designed for those diagnosed with cancer but also for their friends, family and support networks. It is packed with good ideas and advice, as to how different aspects of cancer and health can be addressed, and how we can help each other through difficult times. There are chapters on how to cope with diagnosis, what questions to ask, how to manage your time, and choose your support network. There is a powerful section on positive thinking, and how to boost your mental strength, and a hugely practical section on diet, complete with recipes and store-cupboard ideas. There are chapters on what to say to someone who has been diagnosed with cancer, (and what not to say) and how to be a valuable source of help. All these are backed up with anecdotes and real life experience from Jessica, and shot through with her irrepressible and life-enhancing humour. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Thrive. The Bah! guide to wellness after cancer'

Thrive. The Bah! guide to wellness after cancer (2012)

Hay House

There's still a part of us that thinks surviving cancer is a bit of freakish good fortune - the medical equivalent of having a cannonball go right through your middle and living to tell the tale - and so often it's hard to know how to 'do' life after cancer. Thrive: The Bah! Guide to Wellness after cancer focuses on moving on from a major physical, social and psychological trauma. Like Stephanie's first book, How I Said Bah! to cancer: A Guide to Thinking, Laughing, Living, and Dancing Your Way Through, Thrive uses a blend of storytelling, practical advice, humour, thinking techniques and strategies, visualisations, meditations, questions, candour and common sense designed to help those who have had a cancer to get from survival to a place where they are truly thriving. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'When I die. Lessons from the death zone'

When I die. Lessons from the death zone (2012)

Little, Brown

On 29 January 2008 Philip Gould was told he had cancer. He was stoical, and set about his treatment, determined to fight his illness. In the face of difficult decisions he sought always to understand the disease and the various medical options open to him, supported by his wife Gail and their two daughters, Georgia and Grace. In 2010, after two hard years of chemotherapy and surgery, the tests came up clear - Philip appeared to have won the battle. But his work as a key strategist for the Labour party took its toll, and feeling ill six months later, he insisted on one extra, precautionary test, which told him that the cancer had returned. Thus began Philip's long, painful but ultimately optimistic journey towards death, during which time he began to appreciate and make sense of his life, his work and his relationships in a way he had never thought possible. He realized something that he had never heard articulated before: death need not be only negative or painful, it can be life-affirming and revelatory. Written during the last few months of his life, When I Die describes the journey Philip took with his illness, leaving to us what he called his lessons from the death zone. This courageous, profoundly moving and inspiring work is as valuable a legacy to the world as anyone could wish to bestow - hugely uplifting, beautifully written with extraordinary insight. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Saying goodbye to hare'

Saying goodbye to hare (2012)

Southgate Publishers

This is an uplifting story written for children aged 5-9 years about death and dying. Beautifully illustrated, Saying Goodbye to Hare is full of honesty and warmth. As young Rabbit witnesses the life, illness and death of his dear friend Hare, the story explores some of the feelings and questions children have at this time. Inspired by the author's own personal experience of supporting her young children through the illness and death of their father, the story is sensitively written to give a positive, thoughtful message about death and dying. The book includes guidance notes for the adult supporting the child. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A monster calls'

A monster calls (2012)

Walker Books

The monster showed up after midnight. As they do. But it isn't the monster Conor's been expecting. He’s been expecting the one from his nightmare, the one he’s had nearly every night since his mother started her treatments, the one with the darkness and the wind and the screaming. This monster is something different. Something ancient, something wild. And it wants the most dangerous thing of all from Conor. It wants the truth. Patrick Ness spins a tale from the final idea of Siobhan Dowd, whose premature death from cancer prevented her from writing it herself. Darkly mischievous and painfully funny, 'A Monster Calls' is an extraordinarily moving novel of coming to terms with loss from two of our finest writers for young adults. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Being Sarah'

Being Sarah (2011)

Wordscapes

Being Sarah is Sarah Horton's personal story about breast cancer. As the shock of diagnosis subsides, Sarah starts looking for a treatment plan that suits her, searching for choices, and asks questions about all the medical drugs and treatment offered to her, from chemotherapy to hormone treatment. There are so many questions: in a field where so little is certain, what's best for Sarah? Why do we concentrate on cure rather than prevention? Is our terror about breast cancer sanitised by the 'pink' movement? And will I die? And there aren’t always answers. From the minutiae of getting through each day to the wider feelings of rage, hope, sadness, fear, loss, joy and helplessness, Being Sarah is about life, death, questions, options and choices. Breast cancer statistics in the UK are alarming, and the politics surrounding the illness perplexing. Mortality rates are falling, but diagnoses are rising. One in every nine women can now expect to be diagnosed with breast cancer at some time in her life, and - while we’re getting better at surviving - it’s happening more and more frequently. Sarah Horton is one of the 46,000 women diagnosed with breast cancer in the UK every year. This is her story. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Please don't go. Big John's journey back to life'

Please don't go. Big John's journey back to life (2011)

Mainstream Publishing

In July 2009, former Arsenal, Celtic, West Ham and Wales soccer star John Hartson was diagnosed with testicular cancer, which had also spread to his lungs and brain. But before his treatment even began, John came to the brink of death after contracting pneumonia, ceasing to breathe and undergoing emergency brain surgery. Against all the odds, he pulled through, and in Please Don't Go he documents his incredible fight for life. John's truly inspirational account of how he has managed to overcome a very aggressive form of cancer will offer hope and courage to others affected by the disease. Including the poignant recollections of his wife Sarah and sister Victoria, it is a touching and ultimately uplifting insight into the bravery of the popular football hero, who has fought back to full health in the face of adversity. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Not the last goodbye. Reflections on life, death, healing and cancer'

Not the last goodbye. Reflections on life, death, healing and cancer (2011)

Pan Macmillan

This is the story of an award-winning psychiatrist and neuroscientist who was diagnosed with a brain tumour by his own MRI machine at the age of thirty. It is the story of a doctor turned patient who, after overcoming cancer against the odds, started a twenty-year crusade to inform people about the disease and inspire them to take responsibility for their health. It is the story of a husband and father who is told that the cancer has returned, and that he only has a short time left. This is a story about dying. But most of all, it is a story about living. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The elephant in the room: stories about cancer patients and their doctors'

The elephant in the room: stories about cancer patients and their doctors (2011)

Springer

The Elephant in the Room is a collection of real-life short stories about cancer patients and their doctors. These stories comfort and entertain, inform and engage, and are a treat to read. With humour and empathy, Jonathan Waxman explores the human side of cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of '[sic]. A memoir'

[sic]. A memoir (2011)

Bloomsbury Publishing

Joshua Cody, a young composer, was about to receive his PhD from Columbia University when he was diagnosed with an aggressive cancer. He underwent six months of chemotherapy. The treatment failed. Expectations for survival plummeted. After consulting with several oncologists, he embarked on a risky course of high-dose chemotherapy, full body radiation, and an autologous bone marrow transplant. In a fevered, mesmerising voice, slaloming effortlessly between references to Ezra Pound, The Rolling Stones and Beethoven, he charts the struggle: the fury, the tendency to self-destruction, the ruthless grasping for life, for sensation - the encounter with a strange woman on Canal Street that leads to sex at his apartment; the detailed Hungarian morphine fantasy complete with bride called Valentina while, in reality, hospital staff are pinning him to his bed. As fresh and beguiling as it is brave and revealing, Joshua Cody has created a book that gives readers a long glimpse into a gorgeous, dark thrashing in the forecourt of death. Literary, hallucinatory and at times uncomfortable reading, [sic] is ultimately a celebration of art, language music and life. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Enjoy every sandwich. Living each day as if it were your last'

Enjoy every sandwich. Living each day as if it were your last (2011)

Bantam Press (imprint of Transworld Publications)

As medical director of the famed Preventive Medicine Research Institute, Lee Lipsenthal helped thousands of patients struggling with disease to overcome their fears of pain and death and to embrace a more joyful way of living. In his own life, happily married and the proud father of two remarkable children, Lee was similarly committed to living his life fully and gratefully each day. The power of those beliefs were tested in July 2009, when he was diagnosed with esophageal cancer, leaving him with a 90 percent chance of dying within five years. As Lee and his wife, Kathy, navigated his diagnosis, illness, and treatment, he discovered that he did not fear death, and that even as he was facing his own mortality, he felt more fully alive than ever before. In the tradition of Don't Sweat the Small Stuff, Tuesdays with Morrie and The Last Lecture, Enjoy Every Sandwich distils everything Lee learned about how we find meaning, purpose, and peace in our lives. Told with humour and heart, this deeply inspiring book will help readers embrace their humanity, accept uncertainty, and live a life of gratitude - whether they are facing the end now or not. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Kiss from a rose'

Kiss from a rose (2011)

Self-published using AuthorHouse

Kiss From A Rose is a novel about my battle with cancer. It depicts my journey from being diagnosed at 16, and reflects on four subsequent relapses. Using the stunning rose as a metaphor for life, it is aimed at teenagers who have just been diagnosed with Cancer, and are about to begin their battle. I hope it is both comforting and informative, but also very honest as it describes my darkest moments, and deepest fears. It illustrates that although the Thorns on my Rose prick and sting with each hurdle I approach in my battle to fight this disease, they don't make the flower any less exquisite. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer journey. Positive steps to help yourself heal'

The cancer journey. Positive steps to help yourself heal (2011)

Noble House

'The Cancer Journey. Positive steps to help yourself heal' is an inspirational and compelling book which provides the blueprint for dealing with cancer and is the book of choice for anyone affected by this disease. The authors, Polly, Pam and Nick have all had their own different cancer diagnoses, and feel passionate about sharing the information they have gathered which has helped them understand and cope throughout their journeys. The book is written in a warm, compassionate style with gentle humour, offering comfort and practical advice for anyone affected by cancer including family and friends. What should you eat, what shouldn't you eat? How do you deal with the side-effects? How do you politely tell others 'I have cancer' without triggering an uncomfortable silence! How to prepare for medical appointments and get the best out of your doctors. What can family and friends do to help? This book tells you things you need to know that your health care professionals may not tell you. Whether you have a diagnosis yourself, or you know someone with cancer, this book gives you the tools to empower yourself to take control and it offers advice and guidance to support you throughout your journey. When you arm yourself with knowledge of how to help yourself, you become an empowered participant in your own health. We will walk you through your diagnosis and give you permission and the tools to take control of your situation no matter where you are on the journey. This book gives you all of the information you need to make a difference in your health. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'How I said Bah! to cancer. A guide to thinking, laughing, living and dancing your way through cancer'

How I said Bah! to cancer. A guide to thinking, laughing, living and dancing your way through cancer (2011)

Hay House

This book tells how one woman said 'Bah!' to cancer through thinking strategies, a proactive approach to treatment, and a determination to keep the rest of her life going and retain a sense of humour (most of the time!). It shares everything she learnt along the way, from the nature of cancer cells and chemotherapy drugs, to how she was able to help her friends and family to help her. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'How to be sick. A Buddhist-inspired guide for the chronically ill and their caregivers'

How to be sick. A Buddhist-inspired guide for the chronically ill and their caregivers (2010)

Wisdom Publications

'How to be sick: A Buddhist-inspired guide for the chronically ill' and their caregiver is about living skilfully with the challenges of any chronic illness or condition. I wrote it for sufferers and for their caregivers (the latter includes people involved in hospice, chaplaincy, and elder care; for those interested in chronic illnesses and conditions (health professionals, family and friends); and for people interested in Buddhism (illness can function as a metaphor for suffering which, along with the cessation of suffering, is at the heart of the Buddha’s teaching). Chronic illnesses or conditions - such as arthritis, heart disease, and diabetes (three among dozens) - while not immediately life-threatening, are life-disrupting and stressful. The book is unique in that each chapter contains easy-to-learn tools and practices to help the chronically ill and their caregivers live skilfully, maintain equanimity, and even find joy despite the profound changes in their lives. A recurring theme in the book is that, although one’s body may be sick, one’s mind can be at peace. Some of the practices presented are traditionally Buddhist. Others I devised after becoming ill. Two are from the work of Byron Katie. Each practice is illustrated with examples from my own experience, so the book is also highly personal. The practices are intended to help with the following types of challenges: Suffering due to the relentlessness of physical symptoms; Blaming oneself for being sick; Cursory or dismissive treatment by doctors and medical professionals; The inability to visit with friends, participate in family gatherings, and take part in other social events; Feeling ignored by family or friends; Suffering due to uncertainty about the future; Coping with the disappointment of failed treatments; Caretaker burnout. At the end of the book is a handy reference guide, summarizing the specific tools and practices that can help with each of the above challenges. (Publisher)

Sorry, no publications found.
Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 7 days a week, 8am-8pm