Publications directory

Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 7 days a week, 8am-8pm

The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 1748

Cover image of 'Paclitaxel [French]'

Paclitaxel [French] (October 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Paclitaxel is most commonly used to treat breast, ovarian and non-small-cell lung cancer. This factsheet describes how it is given and the possible side-effects.

Cover image of 'Cisplatin [Russian]'

Cisplatin [Russian] (October 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Cisplatin is a chemotherapy drug used to treat testicular, ovarian, bladder, head and neck, and non-small cell lung cancer. This factsheet describes what it is, how it is given, and possible side effects. 

Cover image of 'Paclitaxel [Portuguese]'

Paclitaxel [Portuguese] (October 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Paclitaxel is most commonly used to treat breast, ovarian and non-small-cell lung cancer. This factsheet describes how it is given and the possible side-effects.

Cover image of 'Paclitaxel [Arabic]'

Paclitaxel [Arabic] (October 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Paclitaxel is most commonly used to treat breast, ovarian and non-small-cell lung cancer. This factsheet describes how it is given and the possible side-effects.

Cover image of 'Love, light and mermaid tails. One woman's healing journey back to wholeness through stage four cancer'

Love, light and mermaid tails. One woman's healing journey back to wholeness through stage four cancer (2017)

Fi Munro

In January 2016, at the age of 30, Fi Munro was diagnosed with non-genetic stage four ovarian cancer. In that moment, after months of pain, tests and assurances that it was ‘nothing to worry about’, her instincts were proved right and her worst fears were realised. In the months that followed, understanding her diagnosis, recovery and health became her full-time job. Using her expertise as a researcher she dedicated her time to understanding everything she could about her diagnosis and subsequent prognosis. In this honest, open and often tear-jerking account of her journey back to wholeness, Fi openly shares her story from diagnosis with stage four ‘terminal’ cancer to living an incredible, healthy life full of joy and laughter. This book is a guide for anyone, not just those with cancer, who wants to embrace a happier, healthier and more caring approach to their life. May it bring you hope, peace and, above all, joy. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'All to live for. Fighting cancer. Finding hope.'

All to live for. Fighting cancer. Finding hope. (2017)

Headline

In 2005 Emma Hannigan was 32, happily married to her long-time love, with two young children. Her world was shattered when she discovered that she had the rare gene BRCA1, meaning a 50% chance of developing ovarian cancer and an 85% chance of breast cancer. To reduce the risk, Emma had a double mastectomy and both ovaries removed, but in 2007 received the news that cancer had struck anyway. Twelve years later, Emma is battling cancer for the tenth time. With warmth and wisdom, she shares her journey and her advice on everything from skincare and hair loss to how to keep a sense of humour through it all. All to Live For is a story of one woman's determination not to let cancer win; a story of strength and inspiration, hope and love. And of never giving up. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Genetic testing and hereditary ovarian cancer. A guide for women with ovarian cancer and their families'

Genetic testing and hereditary ovarian cancer. A guide for women with ovarian cancer and their families (July 2016)

Target Ovarian Cancer

Women who have had a diagnosis of ovarian cancer may worry that other family members may be at risk. This guide explains what a family history of ovarian cancer means, whether family members are at risk of developing hereditary cancer, whether to have a genetic test, and the implications for you and your family if you do have hereditary ovarian cancer.

Cover image of 'What happens next? A guide for women with a recent diagnosis of ovarian cancer'

What happens next? A guide for women with a recent diagnosis of ovarian cancer (November 2016)

Target Ovarian Cancer

This guide is for women with a recent diagnosis of ovarian cancer. It focuses on the practical and emotional needs in the months following diagnosis and offers advice on where to find support.

Cover image of '10 top tips [Welsh]'

10 top tips [Welsh] (February 2016)

Target Ovarian Cancer|Macmillan Cancer Support

This set of ten tips was developed by a workshop group comprising people affected by ovarian cancer and GPs. It aims to help women get the best out of a visit to their GP if they are concerned about symptoms.

Cover image of 'A guide to survivorship for women who have ovarian cancer'

A guide to survivorship for women who have ovarian cancer (2015)

Johns Hopkins University Press

This updated and expanded second edition offers a wealth of information to ease the physical and emotional suffering of women who have ovarian cancer. The expert authors include highly respected and experienced oncologists, gynecologic oncology nurse specialists, researchers, and ovarian cancer survivors. Throughout the book they emphasize the concepts of survivorship, or living life well in the face of daunting uncertainties, and self-determination: the right of each patient to be informed, involved, and in control of her care. Detailed information on diagnosis and treatment, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, pain management, and integrative medicine, constitutes a key feature of the book. Also covered in depth are image recovery, nutrition, pain control, and genetic testing. Women who have ovarian cancer share advice on coping with the life-changing disease and its treatments. Offering candor, compassion, and hope, this remarkable book explains how to add quality to your life and take care of medical and social needs while living with ovarian cancer. (Publisher)

Sorry, no publications found.
Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 7 days a week, 8am-8pm