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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 402

Cover image of 'What to expect at the end of someone's life. Information for family, friends and carers'

What to expect at the end of someone's life. Information for family, friends and carers (July 2019)

Marie Curie

This leaflet aims to help you prepare for the end of your partner, relative or friend’s life. Knowing what to expect can help you prepare yourself for their last few weeks and days. 

Cover image of 'Autologous stem cell transplants. A guide for patients'

Autologous stem cell transplants. A guide for patients (December 2019)

Leukaemia Care

This booklet explains what an autologous stem cell transplant is and who receives one. It describes the procedure and what happens on transplant day, the side effects, graft-versus-host dsease, and what happens if the transplant doesn’t work. It also has a glossary and details of useful contacts and further support. 

Cover image of 'Planning ahead for the end of life (England and Wales) [Gujarati]'

Planning ahead for the end of life (England and Wales) [Gujarati] (November 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

A translation of selected pages (56-59: Do not attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation) from Macmillan Cancer Support’s booklet “Planning ahead for the end of life" [MAC13616_E03_N]

Cover image of 'Financial support - benefits [Turkish]'

Financial support - benefits [Turkish] (March 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This factsheet is about claiming benefits.

Cover image of 'Supporting your pupil after a cancer diagnosis. An information guide for teachers helping children and young
people returning to school after a diagnosis of cancer'

Supporting your pupil after a cancer diagnosis. An information guide for teachers helping children and young people returning to school after a diagnosis of cancer (December 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Getting back to school is vital for children with cancer. School helps them to feel ‘normal’ and reduces the isolation and loneliness which many children with cancer face. Teachers have a really important role to play in encouraging the child’s integration back into a school routine. But cancer is a scary word for many and it is completely normal for teachers and others working at the school to feel upset – not just for the awful situation facing the pupil and their family, but also for the impact on the rest of the class and school community. This guide aims to lessen some of the worries you may have by giving simple practical information and advice on a variety of issues faced by the child and their family, and some ideas on how to help them within a school setting.

Cover image of 'Acute megakaryoblastic leukaemia (AMKL). A guide for patients'

Acute megakaryoblastic leukaemia (AMKL). A guide for patients (March 2019)

Leukaemia Care

Acute megakaryoblastic leukaemia (AMKL) is a rare subtype of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). It is more common in children than in adults. In children with Down syndrome, AMKL is the most common type of AML. This booklet explains what it is, the signs and symptoms, how it is diagnosed and the treatment options. Includes a glossary and details of support.

Cover image of 'Breast care for women'

Breast care for women (August 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support|CHANGE

An easy read booklet about breast cancer, how to check your breasts, changes to look for and breast screening. 

Cover image of 'Planning ahead for the end of life (Scotland)'

Planning ahead for the end of life (Scotland) (November 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support and the Public Health Agency

This booklet is about some of the ways you can plan ahead and make choices about your future care if you live in Scotland. It is for anyone who wants to plan ahead, whether they have a serious illness or not. Planning for your future care is also called advance care planning. It is important in case you ever become unable to make choices yourself. The booklet talks about the ways you can plan ahead, for example writing a will, or making a power of attorney or an advance directive. It also tells you how to talk about planning ahead with your family, friends and health and social care professionals.

Cover image of 'B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). A guide for patients'

B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). A guide for patients (May 2019)

Leukaemia Care

This booklet explains what B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia is, and describes the causes, who it affects, the symptoms and side-effects and treatment options. It also covers issues such as day-to-day life with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, managing your emotions, telling family and friends, survivorship, palliative care, and end-of-life care.

Cover image of 'Adult-T-cell-leukaemia/lymphoma (ATL). A guide for patients'

Adult-T-cell-leukaemia/lymphoma (ATL). A guide for patients (October 2019)

Leukaemia Care

This booklet describes T-cell-leukaemia/lymphoma (ATL) in adults, what causes it, who it affects, how it affects your body, what symptoms to expect and likely treatments. It also covers everyday life with ATL and how to talk to your haematologist and family and friends. Includes a glossary and details of further support. 

Cover image of 'Atypical chronic myeloid leukaemia (aCML). A guide for patients'

Atypical chronic myeloid leukaemia (aCML). A guide for patients (July 2019)

Leukaemia Care

This booklet describes atypical chronic myeloid leukaemia (aCML), what causes it, who it affects, what symptoms to expect, and likely treatments. It also covers everyday life with AML and how to talk to your haematologist and family and friends. Includes a glossary and details of further support.  

Cover image of 'Planning ahead for the end of life. England and Wales'

Planning ahead for the end of life. England and Wales (November 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about some of the ways you can plan ahead and make choices about your future care if you live in England or Wales. It is for anyone who wants to plan ahead, whether they have a serious illness or not. 

Cover image of 'Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN). A guide for patients'

Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN). A guide for patients (September 2019)

Leukaemia Care

Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare cancer of the bone marrow. It was previously known as natural killer (NK) cell leukaemia. This booklet explains what it is, and describes the causes, who it affects, what symptoms to expect, how it is diagnosed, and treatment options. It also covers everyday life, managing your emotions, how to talk to your doctor and family and friends, survivorship, palliative care, and end-of-life care. Includes a glossary and details of further support.  

Cover image of 'All about leukaemia [Easy read]'

All about leukaemia [Easy read] (September 2019)

Leukaemia Care

This booklet explains what leukaemia is, what tests you might have, and the different treatments you might get.

Cover image of 'Understanding primary brain tumours'

Understanding primary brain tumours (September 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about primary brain tumours. It is for anyone who has been diagnosed with a primary brain tumour. There is also information for carers, family members and friends. The booklet explains the signs and symptoms of a primary brain tumour, and how it is diagnosed and treated. It also has information about emotional, practical and financial issues. 

Cover image of 'Azacitidine for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). A guide for patients'

Azacitidine for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). A guide for patients (June 2019)

Leukaemia Care

Azacitidine is a chemotherapy drug used for the treatment of adult patients with acute myeloid leukaemia, high risk myelodysplastic syndrome or chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia who are not eligible for stem cell transplant. This booklet is for patients, family or friends of the patient, or a carer who like to know more about this drug. It describes what azacitidine is, how it is given, and the possible side-effects. It also has details of useful information and support.

Cover image of 'Going home from hospital'

Going home from hospital (March 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet explains how care and support is arranged for people with cancer when they are discharged from hospital.

Cover image of 'A guide for the end of life'

A guide for the end of life (November 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet explains what happens at the end of someone’s life and how to plan for it. It is for anyone nearing the end of life. There is also information for people caring for someone nearing the end of life.

Cover image of 'Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). A guide for parents'

Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). A guide for parents (March 2019)

Leukaemia Care

Being told that your child has acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) can be a shock and very upsetting, particularly when you may never have heard of the disease. This booklet describes childhood ALL, what causes it, who it affects, how it affects your child’s body, what symptoms to expect and likely treatments. It also covers everyday life and childhood ALL and talking about childhood ALL. Includes a glossary of terms and details of useful contacts and further support.

Cover image of 'Your step by step guide to making a will'

Your step by step guide to making a will (November 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This leaflet is a guide to making or updating your will. It is for anyone affected by cancer. It also explains how inheritance tax works, and who to contact for more information and support. 

Cover image of 'Looking after someone with cancer'

Looking after someone with cancer (May 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about looking after someone who has cancer. It explains: what it means to be a carer; who can help support you and the person you care for; the practical, emotional and financial issues you may face, and how to cope with them; ways you can help the person you care for manage symptoms or side effects; how to look after yourself.

Cover image of 'Cancer and pregnancy'

Cancer and pregnancy (November 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support|Mummy's Star

This booklet is for women who have been diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy. It explains the emotional and practical issues you may experience in this situation. It also talks about the treatment you may have and support that will be available to you. 

Cover image of 'Feel more like you. Expert advice on caring for your skin, nails and hair during cancer treatment'

Feel more like you. Expert advice on caring for your skin, nails and hair during cancer treatment (September 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet explains how certain cancer treatments can cause changes to your appearance. It is for people who have had changes to their skin, nails and hair because of cancer treatment. It gives advice on how to manage these changes to help you feel more like you again. We hope it helps you deal with some of the questions or feelings you may have. 

Cover image of 'Coping with advanced cancer'

Coping with advanced cancer (January 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is for people who have cancer that has come back or spread. This is sometimes called advanced cancer. It looks at some of the concerns you may be dealing with and has advice about ways of coping. It also talks about treatments and your feelings and has practical information about getting help and support.

Cover image of 'Sorting out your financial affairs'

Sorting out your financial affairs (October 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is for people affected by cancer who want to plan ahead. It can help you make choices about what will happen to your money and belongings. By planning ahead, you can save family or friends from tough decisions or financial difficulties in the future. This booklet also explains how to arrange for someone to help you if you become unable to look after your finances. 

Cover image of 'Working while caring for someone with cancer'

Working while caring for someone with cancer (April 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet aims to help working carers cope with work issues they may face because of the impact of their caring role on working life. It describes who a carer is, the different ways of caring, and the impact of cancer treatment on the working carer. It has advice about what to say at work, talking to employers, the legal rights of carers in paid work, social care, financial support, and bereavement. Includes details of useful organisations and websites.

Cover image of 'Diet and nutrition'

Diet and nutrition (December 2019)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This leaflet is for anyone receiving treatment or who has recently completed their treatment.There’s no specific food or type of diet that can control or treat brain tumours, but controlling your diet may help to improve your quality of life and manage the side-effects of treatment, such as dry mouth, nausea, poor appetite, and weight loss.

Cover image of 'Blood clot prevention. A guide for patients and carers'

Blood clot prevention. A guide for patients and carers (May 2019)

The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust

This booklet explains the risk of developing a blood clot while in hospital. It describes the signs of a blood clot, who is at risk, and how to reduce the risk of developing a blood clot. Please note: this booklet includes contact details and instructions specific to the Royal Marsden Hospital.

Cover image of 'Pampering therapy'

Pampering therapy (April 2019)

Look Good...Feel Better

Information about Look Good Feel Better with details of workshop locations in the UK.

Cover image of 'Tommy v cancer. One man’s battle against the Big C. (Again).'

Tommy v cancer. One man’s battle against the Big C. (Again). (2019)

Independently published

In March 2016, cancer attacked me for the first time. I was diagnosed with inoperable, stage four throat cancer and underwent intensive courses of both chemotherapy and radiotherapy which left me extremely weak and vulnerable to infection. As a result, I contracted double pneumonia and sepsis and was rushed into intensive care where my family was told that, unless I began responding to treatment, I had approximately two hours left to live. Thankfully, I pulled through and set off upon the long road to recovery. It was the hardest thing I've ever faced but - eventually, in the summer of 2017 - I was declared cancer free.For a few months, at least. In January 2018, a routine scan found the cancer had returned - and had now spread to my lungs. Bugger. "Tommy v cancer: Round Two" continues the story of my fight to survive the 'Big C', salvage what remained of my career, and support my terrified family through yet another battle of life and death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Finding your way. Caring for yourself while caring for someone else'

Finding your way. Caring for yourself while caring for someone else (2019)

Rippling Print

If you are caring for someone, this book is for you. It contains everything that helped Verran to find his way as he cared for his wife Karen, from her initial diagnosis to her death 8½ years later. “This is so beautiful, so helpful right now.” Rachel, caring for her mother. Whenever he discovered a new way to do something, or a new way of thinking, or being that worked for him, he wrote it down in a notebook. Page by page, that notebook became this book - a collection of reminders that helped him time and time again, and especially when he was struggling. “This book connects to the human in all of us, a hand to hold, and a guiding light.” Lee, caring for his wife. The thoughts within this book still help Verran today, and he now offers it to you in the hope that it will help you too. He invites you to try whatever catches your eye, whatever makes sense to you in your heart. Also to notice whenever you find a new way that works for you, and to add your own reminders. It is Verran’s hope that these thoughts will help you to adapt, and to grow, and to find your way. Your way to truly be with those that you care for, to nurture your own peace of mind, and to create the space you need for you. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer roller coaster. How to manage the emotional and mental impact'

The cancer roller coaster. How to manage the emotional and mental impact (2019)

Librotas

Two days after celebrating her 50th birthday, Juliette Chan had an unexpected birthday present: bowel cancer. Luckily, they caught it early, but once the treatment was over, the psychological side-effects surfaced. For many months, Juliette was adrift and felt lost. It seemed that everything in her life was up for review and she struggled to gain clarity about what to do next. There were many questions, such as: When will I feel normal again; Why am I not as motivated as before; Will the cancer come back; Why am I mentally exhausted. It took her a while to realise that the cancer had caused a whole load of losses: loss of trust in her body, self-image as a fit and healthy person, energy, confidence, motivation, income and much more. And that’s when the penny dropped; she was grieving. Cancer not only involves coping with the physical disease and treatment – it also means experiencing and dealing with hidden losses that will affect how you view and live your life. Every time you experience a loss, there is an emotional response: grief. Most people only associate grief with bereavement but it is in fact a natural reaction to any and all losses, including the hidden and intangible losses you face with cancer. Anyone who has or has had cancer, as well as their family and friends, will experience grief – because life has changed. This can show up as anger, frustration, anxiety, ‘depression’, fear, sadness, for example. If left unchecked or suppressed, grief will affect your mental health and emotional wellbeing. It doesn’t have to be like this; it is possible to take care of the emotional and mental impact of cancer and to live well. In her easy, relaxed style of writing, Juliette explains the emotional and mental impact of cancer and highlights the limitations of Mindfulness and positive thinking. She has also included a workbook with simple practical exercises that help to release the psychological side-effects and provide clarity. You can also read the candid stories of eight others who faced cancer: Robert describes his initial feelings of shock on diagnosis and how others helped him to cope, whereas Meena recounts going it alone; Petra shares how she continued to run throughout her treatment, and Susan talks movingly about the seemingly endless decision-making from diagnosis onwards; Mary, Tony and June recount their unique experiences of the same cancer

Cover image of 'Focus on mouth cancer'

Focus on mouth cancer (September 2018)

Cancer Focus Northern Ireland

This leaflet has facts about mouth cancer and describes the symptoms, who is at risk and how to reduce the risk. 

Cover image of 'Patient charter. The care you should expect and receive'

Patient charter. The care you should expect and receive (September 2018)

Pancreatic Cancer UK

This booklet explains the standards of care everybody with pancreatic cancer should have while they are being diagnosed and treated for pancreatic cancer. You can use it as a guide to what you should expect. It can also help you talk to your doctors and nurses about the care you should receive.

Cover image of '7 steps to equal healthcare. Your guide to getting good health care if you have a learning disability [Easy read]'

7 steps to equal healthcare. Your guide to getting good health care if you have a learning disability [Easy read] (June 2018)

ENABLE Scotland|Macmillan Cancer Support|CHANGE

This booklet is about getting good health care if you have cancer and a learning disability.

Cover image of 'Caring for someone with a lung condition. Information for carers, family and friends'

Caring for someone with a lung condition. Information for carers, family and friends (November 2018)

British Lung Foundation

Information and support for those caring for someone with a lung condition (not specifically lung cancer).

Cover image of 'Patient guide. Palliative care'

Patient guide. Palliative care (July 2018)

Brainstrust

One in a series of eight leaflets that form the Brain Tumour Patient Guide.

Cover image of 'The cancer guide [Audio CD]'

The cancer guide [Audio CD] (August 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Audio CD of the booklet, which is designed to inform people affected by cancer about cancer treatment and care. It explains the different stages that people go through when they have cancer, the roles of various cancer care professionals, and how to get additional support and information.

Cover image of 'Patient guide. End of life care'

Patient guide. End of life care (July 2018)

Brainstrust

One in a series of eight leaflets that form the Brain Tumour Patient Guide.

Cover image of 'Pancreatic cancer and end of life care. Information for people in the last few months, weeks or days of life'

Pancreatic cancer and end of life care. Information for people in the last few months, weeks or days of life (March 2018)

Pancreatic Cancer UK

This booklet is for people with pancreatic cancer, their family, friends and carers who want to know more about what may happen in the last few months of life. It includes information about the symptoms that people with pancreatic cancer may get towards the end of their life and how to manage them. There is also information about how to get the care and support you might need, dealing with the emotional impact of dying from pancreatic cancer, and specific information for family members. 

Cover image of 'Managing your lung cancer diagnosis'

Managing your lung cancer diagnosis (August 2018)

Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation

If you or someone you care for has just been diagnosed with lung cancer, then it’s almost certain that you’ll have a lot of questions. We have produced this booklet in partnership with lung cancer experts and people affected by lung cancer to help you make positive informed choices about your care and treatment. 

Cover image of 'Radiotherapy for lung cancer'

Radiotherapy for lung cancer (August 2018)

Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation

If you or someone one you care for has a diagnosis of lung cancer and radiotherapy is a possible treatment option, then it’s almost certain that you will have a lot of questions. We have produced this booklet in partnership with expertise from lung oncologists (cancer doctors), radiographers, lung cancer nurse specialists and people affected by lung cancer to help you make positive, informed choices about your care and treatment.

Cover image of 'Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)'

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (March 2018)

Breast Cancer Care

This booklet describes ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the symptoms, how a diagnosis is made, the different types of DCIS, and the treatment options. It also has a short section on coping with breast cancer.

Cover image of 'Who's who in your clinical team?'

Who's who in your clinical team? (July 2018)

Brainstrust

A who's who of healthcare professionals involved in the care of someone with a brain tumour: GP; consultant neurosurgeon; consultant neurologist; consultant radiologist; neuro-oncologist; clinical psychologist; neuro-ophthalmologist; community neurological rehabilitation nurse; neuro-oncology clinical nurse specialist; epilepsy nurse; palliative care nurse; specialist allied health professional; disability co-ordinator (higher education). It describes the role of each professional and how they can help.

Cover image of 'Breast cancer and hair loss'

Breast cancer and hair loss (January 2018)

Breast Cancer Care

Many people will lose either some or all of their hair as a result of treatment for breast cancer. For some, this is the most distressing side effect of treatment. Some people find that being prepared for hair loss before it occurs helps them cope better when it happens. This booklet explains how you may lose your hair and the effect it can have. It looks at how to care for your hair and scalp during and after treatment and the different headwear you may want to try, including wigs and headscarves. It includes step-by-step guides to tying headscarves and tips on recreating the illusion of eyebrows and eyelashes. The final part of the booklet discusses what usually happens when your hair grows back and how to look after it.

Cover image of 'If you are diagnosed with cancer – a quick guide [Urdu]'

If you are diagnosed with cancer – a quick guide [Urdu] (December 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This information is about what to expect when you find out you have cancer and where to get help and support.  

Cover image of 'If you are diagnosed with cancer – a quick guide [Polish]'

If you are diagnosed with cancer – a quick guide [Polish] (December 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This information is about what to expect when you find out you have cancer and where to get help and support. Includes the English-language version.

Cover image of 'If you are diagnosed with cancer – a quick guide [Russian]'

If you are diagnosed with cancer – a quick guide [Russian] (December 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This information is about what to expect when you find out you have cancer and where to get help and support. Includes the English-language version.

Cover image of 'Managing lung cancer symptoms'

Managing lung cancer symptoms (August 2018)

Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation

If you or someone you care for has just been diagnosed with lung cancer you may have lots of questions. This booklet was produced with input from people affected by lung cancer and lung cancer experts, and is designed to help answer those questions.It describes the possible symptoms that may experienced when living with lung cancer and how to cope with them.

Cover image of 'If you are diagnosed with cancer – a quick guide [Bengali]'

If you are diagnosed with cancer – a quick guide [Bengali] (December 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This information is about what to expect when you find out you have cancer and where to get help and support. Includes the English-language version.

Sorry, no publications found.
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