Publications directory

Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 7 days a week, 8am-8pm

The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 438

Cover image of 'Coping with the psychological effects of illness. Strategies to manage anxiety and depression'

Coping with the psychological effects of illness. Strategies to manage anxiety and depression (2015)

Sheldon Press

Sudden, severe ill health comes as a shock and presents several challenges, most notably, loss of confidence. Suddenly people are afraid to take exercise, have sex or even go to the shops. Their entire self-image takes a battering, and this roller-coaster of uncertainty often leads to anxiety and depression. This book looks at the learning curve involved in sudden and chronic illness, and explores key ways to build psychological resilience during this time of challenge. Whether it concerns cancer, heart disease, diabetes, or a mental health condition, it explores the common psychological issues that arise when someone’s usual health and routine are disrupted, and discusses the impact of illness on relationships and family. Drawing on CBT techniques, it offers practical self-help strategies to help deal with peoples changed expectations of themselves, and with the related lifestyle changes. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Managing prostate cancer. A guide for living better'

Managing prostate cancer. A guide for living better (2015)

Oxford University Press

The statistics are sobering: over 200,000 men in the United States are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year. With this diagnosis, men are expected to psychologically combat the worry, practical concerns, and the emotional and physical changes during an immensely trying time. How to help? In Managing Prostate Cancer: A Guide for Living Better, Dr. Andrew J. Roth, a psychiatrist specializing in psychological support for cancer patients, provides the emotional skills and strategies necessary to help patients deal with the challenges a prostate cancer diagnosis brings to everyday life. These tools, which Dr. Roth terms Emotional Judo, effectively teach patients to identify what their fears are rooted in, how to distinguish the rational and irrational aspects of their thoughts and behaviors, make healthier choices to promote a more positive approach, and ultimately transform their lives into a more fulfilling and peaceful journey. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Invincibility in the face of prostate cancer: coming out the other side'

Invincibility in the face of prostate cancer: coming out the other side (2015)

The Cloister House Press

Throughout his extensive career Alfred Samuels was a bodyguard to some the world's most recognised celebrities. He was a physically active and mentally alert individual who provided the needs of his particular industry over many years. In January 2012 his world came to a sudden and unforeseeable halt when he was diagnosed with advanced metastatic prostate cancer, stage four. Alfred Samuels’ honest and frank account is one part of his mission to challenge men's attitudes and the taboo surrounding prostate cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Fast facts: Multiple myeloma and plasma cell dyscrasias'

Fast facts: Multiple myeloma and plasma cell dyscrasias (2015)

Health Press

Multiple myeloma accounts for approximately 0.8% of cancers worldwide, with about 114 000 new cases each year. Rapid progress is being made in the development of new treatments and, although myeloma is incurable at present, survival has almost tripled over the past 10 years and it is now projected that a third of patients will survive more than 10 years after diagnosis. Fast Facts: Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Dyscrasias emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis for a favourable outcome, covers the ever-increasing role of genetics in diagnosis and treatment, and discusses new and gold-standard treatments. A chapter on supportive care also features and briefs the reader on long-term outcomes and quality of life issues. Although primarily intended for health care professionals, this highly readable resource may be of interest to patients wanting to know more about multiple myeloma and plasma cell dyscrasias. Written for doctors, read by patients too. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Staying alive. How to get the best from the NHS'

Staying alive. How to get the best from the NHS (2015)

Quercus

The NHS is our most treasured institution, but even caring doctors have too many patients and too little time, while patients often feel too overwhelmed, embarrassed, intimidated or ill to ask the right questions. Your chances of getting the best care that's right for you are greatly improved if you are able to share in decisions about your treatment. In Staying Alive, Dr Phil Hammond, a GP and campaigner with unrivalled sympathy for patients' needs, helps give you the confidence and the tools to take control of your health care, and shows you in a friendly but authoritative way how to navigate the system. This book will show you how to get your GP to listen to you and take your symptoms seriously, how to get hold of your patient records so you can ensure they're correct, how to get a second opinion and, most importantly, how to get better (and in turn help make the NHS better too). (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Under cover of darkness. How I blogged my way through mantle cell lymphoma'

Under cover of darkness. How I blogged my way through mantle cell lymphoma (2015)

O-Books (John Hunt Publishing)

Not only is this book an inspiring survival manual for cancer patients, but its humour and objectivity make it a choice read for anyone who enjoys real-life drama and pathos. Diagnosed with Mantle Cell Lymphoma in 2012 the author resorted to a blog to keep in touch with friends, and unwittingly ended up writing about the good, the bad and the ugly side of cancer, which attracted many followers. Is there a good? Very possibly. Bad and ugly, definitely. There is also an extremely funny side - wry observations that brought humour into an otherwise bleak landscape which included chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant. The author is also blessed with a big following from the Mind, Body, Spirit community of which she is a part (including Judy Hall, Anita Moorjani, Dolores Ashcroft-Nowicki); from this outpouring of expert support came advice on nutrition and alternative therapies which help to make this an invaluable source of information for cancer patients and their carers. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The smear test film'

The smear test film (2014)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

'The Smear Test Film' is a health education film resource for women eligible for cervical screening (smear tests) who have mild and moderate learning disabilities. It has been made by Public Health England in association with Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust. Professional guidance and support in the development of this resource was provided by the Better Health Team for Learning Disabilities at Somerset Partnership NHS Foundation Trust. The film has been designed and made by women who have learning disabilities. It aims to give women and their carers information about smear tests and their role in preventing cervical cancer and help women make a decision about whether to attend their smear test invitation.

Cover image of 'Shrinking the smirch. A workbook to enable and inspire people with physical or mental health challenges'

Shrinking the smirch. A workbook to enable and inspire people with physical or mental health challenges (2014)

Speechmark Publishing Ltd

Shrinking the Smirch is a unique workbook for anybody who is living with a long term physical or psychological condition including MS, Parkinson's, brain injury, epilepsy, chronic fatigue, epilepsy, stroke, cancer, depression, eating disorders, trauma or anxiety. The workbook asks the reader to think about their symptoms as something external to them - a smirch. A smirch is an annoying little imaginary creature who seeks to make humans sad and unhealthy, helps you work out what your smirch makes you think, feel and do and create an image or description of your own smirch, includes twenty practical ways to shrink your smirch ideas, based on psychological approaches that have been proven to work including narrative therapy, CBT. ACT, systemic and solution focused models as well as mindfulness and positive psychological. This book offers a dynamic approach to managing mental and physical health challenges. Written in an accessible but unpatronising manner with marvellous pictures and some positive humour make it an easy read and will be a very useful resource for individuals with health conditions as well as therapists, teachers, life coaches and health professionals. (Publishing)

Cover image of '[Urgent toilet card]'

[Urgent toilet card] (March 2014)

Prostate Cancer UK

A wallet sized card for men with prostate problems, who may need urgent access to a toilet. It does not guarantee access but may make it easier to ask for help.

Cover image of 'The ripple effect: how a positive attitude and a caring community helped save my life'

The ripple effect: how a positive attitude and a caring community helped save my life (2014)

Self-published using iUniverse

The author, Steven Lewis, in superb life-long health, was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, a disease with a survival rate of only 5%. In spite of this, Steven and his wife struggled to achieve and deliberately maintain an extremely positive attitude. This choice started a "ripple effect" that created an exceptionally caring and upbeat community of family, relatives and friends and enabled this community to return even more positive energy to Steven. The story became even more intense when Steven endured a second bout of pancreatic cancer that metastasized to his liver. Surviving a second bout of pancreatic cancer is so rare that no statistics are kept. Today, Steven is cancer free, in excellent health and works out strenuously. Virtually all of us, at some point, will experience extreme life difficulties involving circumstances such as severe illness, injuries, accidents, divorce or natural disasters. A positive attitude can help us think clearly, be solution oriented and ultimately prevail. Whether Steven physically survived or not, an attitude of complaint and negativity would have shattered his emotional life and that of his family. Steven's choice was to stay positive and upbeat in spite of his situation. What would you have done? (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'The cancer wellness cookbook'

The cancer wellness cookbook (2014)

Sasquatch Books

This book's mission is simple: optimise the quality of life for people living with cancer. Based on the latest scientific research, this nutritional plan focuses on the foods that have been shown to prevent and forestall the spread of cancer. Also, here are 100 recipes that are bountiful in the nutrients that aid a person undergoing chemotherapy. And these dishes taste great, even for someone with a diminished appetite. Super-healthy foods like berries, mushrooms, beans, tomatoes and fish, make for tasty meals that are so, so good for your health. Understand what foods are especially healthy and why, and then make any of the 100 recipes to aid a healthy lifestyle that is so important before, during and after treatment. This is the nutrition plan and cookbook from Seattle's Cancer Lifeline, a 40-year old organisation dedicated to optimising the lives of people living with cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Travels with Cookie. Narrowboat cruising with a cat'

Travels with Cookie. Narrowboat cruising with a cat (2014)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Between 2004 and 2006, David Thomas experienced a series of disasters in his life, culminating in being told that he only had a short time left to live. Rather than sinking into despair as many people would, he decided to fulfil his lifelong dream of living on a canal boat, while he still could. So he bought a narrowboat, LadyRiverMouse (an anagram of 'Live Your Dreams') with a view to spending the rest of his limited life cruising the canals and rivers of England. Naturally, he had to take the love of his life with him – a rather bad-tempered fluffy white prima donna of a cat called Cookie. Cookie was an indoor cat who had rarely been outside, never mind living on a boat, where according to David dogs are usually the pets of choice. Would it work out? David didn't know, but as he put it, “I wasn't going anywhere without my beloved Cookie”. The remainder of the book is an account of the few years David spent travelling through the waterways of his native land. Many people live on boats; few cruise as extensively as David did – to London, along the Thames, up to Wales, then tackling the wild and often desolate rivers of North West England. A beginner to boating when he started, David learned much as time went on, mainly by having numerous – and often hair-raising - adventures. So did Cookie, who contrived to get lost, fall in the water on a number of occasions, and generally use up most of her cat's nine lives. Finally David met Helen, a helicopter instructor, writer, and – most importantly – cat lover. They fell in love, and David's life began to change yet again, leading to the eventual sale of LadyRiverMouse and a new life in the Peak District for David and Cookie. David knows about boating, has an eye for detail, and is also an astute observer of his fellow men and women, both on and off the waterways. Therefore this book will clearly be of interest to those who have ever travelled on the canals or done any other boating, anyone who loves travel of any type, or simply the armchair traveller who enjoys reading about others' adventures. But “Travels With Cookie” is more than just another boating or travel book. It is a tale of bereavement and divorce, of terminal illness and despair, and finally of romance, a seemingly miraculous cure, and a new life. Hence it should appeal to anyone who likes human interest stories of any type. And of course – as Cookie herself would tell you if she could speak - it i

Cover image of 'The cancer survivor's companion. Practical ways to cope with your feelings after cancer'

The cancer survivor's companion. Practical ways to cope with your feelings after cancer (2013)

Piatkus (Little, Brown Book Group)

Coping with life after cancer can be tough. The idea that the end of successful treatment brings relief and peace just isn't true for countless survivors. Many feel unexpectedly alone, worried and adrift. You're supposed to be getting your life 'back on track' but your life has changed. You have changed. With reassurance and understanding, Dr Frances Goodhart and Lucy Atkins help readers deal with the emotional fallout of cancer whether it's days, months or years since the treatment ended. Drawing on Dr Goodhart's extensive experience working in the NHS with cancer survivors, this guide is packed with practical and simple self-help tools to tackle issues such as worry and anxiety, depression and low mood, anger, low self-esteem and body image, relationships and sex, fatigue, sleep and relaxation. If you are a cancer survivor, this book will support you every step of the way. If you are supporting a loved one, friend, colleague or your patient, this is a vital read. Winner of the 2012 Best Health Book category in the Guild of Health Writers Awards and highly commended in the Popular Medicine category at the BMA Medical Book Awards 2012 this is the first UK book to look in depth at cancer survivorship and its emotional fallout. Government statistics indicate around 2 million people in the UK survive for at least 5 years post diagnosis and this figure is set to increase. This book will be an invaluable resource. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'How to feel better. Practical ways to recover from illness and injury'

How to feel better. Practical ways to recover from illness and injury (2013)

Piatkus (Little, Brown Book Group)

In days gone by, people understood that a knock to your health takes its toll on your emotions, your relationships, your morale, your 'spirit'. But these days, we think that if the doctor has waved you off, then you are 'better'. If only it were this simple. The truth is that when your body takes a serious knock so does your mind - your thoughts and feelings. Often people feel worried, confused, lonely, depressed, unsupported or overwhelmed. You may be grappling with ongoing physical challenges: disability, pain, treatment side effects, sleep problems and fatigue. And you may have practical concerns over finances or work - or may simply be trying to 'adjust'. That's when this new book, from the authors of The Cancer Survivor's Companion (highly commended by the BMA and winner of the Guild of Health Writers' Best Health Book 2012), will prove invaluable. It offers simple, practical ways to find a path through the space between illness and health. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'My left boob. A cancer diary'

My left boob. A cancer diary (2013)

Book Guild Publishing

Diagnosed with breast cancer in her fifties, award-winning actress and glamour girl-about-town Sally Farmiloe-Neville decided to keep a diary. This is the frank and honest account of her fight to beat the tumour within, retain as much of her left breast as possible - and carry on working meanwhile. Filled with helpful advice to fellow sufferers based on her own experiences, needle-phobic Sally documents her treatment as she goes through the horrors of chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy, helped by a healer, a hypnotherapist and a special diet. When her trademark 'big' hair falls out she reveals how she coped by getting ‘Crystal’, a long blonde NHS wig that wowed every man she met. Her family and friends - including many famous household names - are by her side throughout, but many of them have fought their own battles with the big C and Sally documents their stories, too. Always upbeat, never sorry for herself, this is the courageous tale of one woman's struggle to regain her health. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Nourish. The cancer care cookbook'

Nourish. The cancer care cookbook (2013)

Penny Brohn Cancer Care

Eating well is important when you are living with cancer. Research proves that what you eat can protect you against cancer as well as having a crucial impact before, during and after treatment. But often you may feel too tired, ill or stressed to prepare a balanced and nutritious meal, or you may not feel like eating at all. Don't worry -help is at hand. Nourish, brought to you by the team at Penny Brohn Cancer Care, shows you how to create simple meals, snacks and drinks that are packed with nutrients to support your body. And if you're cooking for a loved one you can rest assured that you will be providing the best possible meals to make them feel better. In Nourish you will find over 70 easy to prepare recipes that incorporate nutrient rich foods to support your body, optimize your enjoyment of food and benefit your health. Whether you are undergoing treatment, have opted to eat healthier as a preventative measure or are supporting someone through cancer and wish to provide nourishing dishes for them, this book will be your culinary guide. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Emotional support through breast cancer. The alternative handbook'

Emotional support through breast cancer. The alternative handbook (2013)

Radcliffe Publishing

This compassionate guide presents an array of new perspectives on the emotional effects of breast cancer and includes many personal testimonies from women who have been diagnosed with this disease. Written by a breast cancer survivor and practising psychologist, it shares practical ideas to help support sufferers at all stages, be it at diagnosis, during treatment or during life after the initial treatments are over. The concise, easy-to-read format includes exercises to develop an acceptance of thoughts and feelings, whilst the individual accounts validate the multitude of emotions felt by sufferers. It is a must for all breast cancer patients and sufferers, their families and friends. Its real-life approach, using first hand accounts, is also highly recommended for all health and social care professionals wanting a fresh approach to managing the emotional impacts of breast cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The pink moon lovelies. Empowering stories of survival'

The pink moon lovelies. Empowering stories of survival (2013)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

The Pink Moon Lovelies are members of the Facebook group Beyond the Pink Moon, named after Nicki Boscia Durlester’s memoir that intimately chronicles her journey after a breast cancer diagnosis. Nicki created the group to provide an active forum for discussion to raise awareness about the BRCA gene and breast and ovarian cancer. She never dreamed her homespun story would travel around the globe and Beyond the Pink Moon would become a support group for people from all walks of life coming together to lift each other up with inspiration, humor, faith and love. With Lovelies in Australia, Canada, England, France, Ireland, Israel, Mexico, Namibia, New Zealand, Singapore, Slovakia, South Africa, Sweden, Tasmania and the USA, Nicki, a BRCA2 survivor, and fellow moderator, Melissa Johnson Voight, a BRCA1 previvor, whose journey of steadfast faith and courage of conviction is included in this book, have encouraged their members to tell their stories with one goal in mind, to save lives. With a Foreword written by renowned breast surgeon, Dr. Kristi Funk, this riveting collection of 50 stories includes: the unflinching account of Barbie Ritzco, a United States Marine who kept silent about discovering a lump in her breast in order to deploy with her unit to Afghanistan, putting her country before her health, the moving story of Ally Durlester, Nicki’s daughter, a 25 year old BRCA2 previvor who will undergo prophylactic surgery to try to avoid the same fate as her mother, grandmother and six great-aunts who all had breast, ovarian or fallopian tube cancer, the frustrating story of Erika Grogin Lange, an Israeli Lovely and mother of five, whose nagging symptoms of fatigue, nausea and bloating went undiagnosed for months until she heard the shocking news that she had Stage III ovarian cancer, and the unpredictable journey of Susan Long Martucci, a two-time breast cancer survivor, disease free for 13 years, blindsided by another diagnosis. She is the beacon of hope who coined the term Pink Moon Lovelies. Each story is compelling and has an important message to impart. The Pink Moon Lovelies, Empowering Stories of Survival concludes with the story of the incomparable May Smith, the 32 year old South African Lovely who left a legacy of extraordinary courage, grace and love. Hers was a life well lived. When May sadly passed away on July 22, 2012 from breast cancer she left the Pink Moon Lovelies with one final message filled with wisdom and advice beyond her years. H

Cover image of 'Words for wellbeing: using creative writing to benefit health and wellbeing'

Words for wellbeing: using creative writing to benefit health and wellbeing (2012)

Cumbria Partnership NHS Foundation Trust

Words for Wellbeing' is an edited collection of prose and poems from patients, health care staff, carers and the general public. The authors included in the book all have their own story to tell about how writing has helped improve their health and wellbeing. The contributors include people from across Cumbria and from ages 7 to 94 years old, and include emotional pieces about a variety of subjects, and includes a foreword is written by award-winning writer Jim Eldridge. There are 14 chapters, including one written by leading author Dr Gillie Bolton. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Living with cancer: endings and beginnings'

Living with cancer: endings and beginnings (2012)

Dorset County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Six people (two men, four women) who had recently been treated for cancer at Dorset County Hospital met with writer Rosie Jackson for some creative writing workshops in October 2012. This booklet is their personal response to the experience of being diagnosed with cancer and going through treatment and its aftermath.

Cover image of 'The topic of cancer'

The topic of cancer (2012)

Jessica Richards

The Topic of Cancer takes a completely new look at the disease which currently affects around one in every 200 people at some point in their lives. It is first and foremost, a manual, designed for those diagnosed with cancer but also for their friends, family and support networks. It is packed with good ideas and advice, as to how different aspects of cancer and health can be addressed, and how we can help each other through difficult times. There are chapters on how to cope with diagnosis, what questions to ask, how to manage your time, and choose your support network. There is a powerful section on positive thinking, and how to boost your mental strength, and a hugely practical section on diet, complete with recipes and store-cupboard ideas. There are chapters on what to say to someone who has been diagnosed with cancer, (and what not to say) and how to be a valuable source of help. All these are backed up with anecdotes and real life experience from Jessica, and shot through with her irrepressible and life-enhancing humour. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Please don't go. Big John's journey back to life'

Please don't go. Big John's journey back to life (2011)

Mainstream Publishing

In July 2009, former Arsenal, Celtic, West Ham and Wales soccer star John Hartson was diagnosed with testicular cancer, which had also spread to his lungs and brain. But before his treatment even began, John came to the brink of death after contracting pneumonia, ceasing to breathe and undergoing emergency brain surgery. Against all the odds, he pulled through, and in Please Don't Go he documents his incredible fight for life. John's truly inspirational account of how he has managed to overcome a very aggressive form of cancer will offer hope and courage to others affected by the disease. Including the poignant recollections of his wife Sarah and sister Victoria, it is a touching and ultimately uplifting insight into the bravery of the popular football hero, who has fought back to full health in the face of adversity. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Pink ribbon blues. How breast cancer culture undermines women's health'

Pink ribbon blues. How breast cancer culture undermines women's health (2011)

Oxford University Press

Pink ribbon paraphernalia saturate shopping malls, billboards, magazines, television, and other venues, all in the name of breast cancer awareness. In this compelling and provocative work, Gayle Sulik shows that though this 'pink ribbon culture' has brought breast cancer advocacy much attention, it has not had the desired effect of improving women's health. It may, in fact, have done the opposite. Based on eight years of research, analysis of advertisements and breast cancer awareness campaigns, and hundreds of interviews with those affected by the disease, Pink Ribbon Blues highlights the hidden costs of the pink ribbon as an industry, one in which breast cancer has become merely a brand name with a pink logo. Indeed, while survivors and supporters walk, run, and purchase ribbons for a cure, cancer rates rise, the cancer industry thrives, corporations claim responsible citizenship while profiting from the disease, and breast cancer is stigmatized anew for those who reject the pink ribbon model. But Sulik also outlines alternative organizations that make a real difference, highlights what they do differently, and presents a new agenda for the future. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer journey. Positive steps to help yourself heal'

The cancer journey. Positive steps to help yourself heal (2011)

Noble House

'The Cancer Journey. Positive steps to help yourself heal' is an inspirational and compelling book which provides the blueprint for dealing with cancer and is the book of choice for anyone affected by this disease. The authors, Polly, Pam and Nick have all had their own different cancer diagnoses, and feel passionate about sharing the information they have gathered which has helped them understand and cope throughout their journeys. The book is written in a warm, compassionate style with gentle humour, offering comfort and practical advice for anyone affected by cancer including family and friends. What should you eat, what shouldn't you eat? How do you deal with the side-effects? How do you politely tell others 'I have cancer' without triggering an uncomfortable silence! How to prepare for medical appointments and get the best out of your doctors. What can family and friends do to help? This book tells you things you need to know that your health care professionals may not tell you. Whether you have a diagnosis yourself, or you know someone with cancer, this book gives you the tools to empower yourself to take control and it offers advice and guidance to support you throughout your journey. When you arm yourself with knowledge of how to help yourself, you become an empowered participant in your own health. We will walk you through your diagnosis and give you permission and the tools to take control of your situation no matter where you are on the journey. This book gives you all of the information you need to make a difference in your health. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Artichoke hearts'

Artichoke hearts (2011)

Macmillan Children's Books

Twelve-year-old Mira comes from a chaotic, artistic and outspoken family where it’s not always easy to be heard. As her beloved Nana Josie's health declines, Mira begins to discover the secrets of those around her, and also starts to keep some of her own. She is drawn to mysterious Jide, a boy who is clearly hiding a troubled past and has grown hardened layers - like those of an artichoke - around his heart. As Mira is experiencing grief for the first time, she is also discovering the wondrous and often mystical world around her. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Not the last goodbye. Reflections on life, death, healing and cancer'

Not the last goodbye. Reflections on life, death, healing and cancer (2011)

Pan Macmillan

This is the story of an award-winning psychiatrist and neuroscientist who was diagnosed with a brain tumour by his own MRI machine at the age of thirty. It is the story of a doctor turned patient who, after overcoming cancer against the odds, started a twenty-year crusade to inform people about the disease and inspire them to take responsibility for their health. It is the story of a husband and father who is told that the cancer has returned, and that he only has a short time left. This is a story about dying. But most of all, it is a story about living. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Do I need a smear test?'

Do I need a smear test? (2010)

Health Scotland on behalf of the Family Advice and Information Resource

Illustrated booklet for women with learning difficulties. It explains what a smear test is, who should have one and when, and what the smear test will show.

Cover image of 'How to be sick. A Buddhist-inspired guide for the chronically ill and their caregivers'

How to be sick. A Buddhist-inspired guide for the chronically ill and their caregivers (2010)

Wisdom Publications

'How to be sick: A Buddhist-inspired guide for the chronically ill' and their caregiver is about living skilfully with the challenges of any chronic illness or condition. I wrote it for sufferers and for their caregivers (the latter includes people involved in hospice, chaplaincy, and elder care; for those interested in chronic illnesses and conditions (health professionals, family and friends); and for people interested in Buddhism (illness can function as a metaphor for suffering which, along with the cessation of suffering, is at the heart of the Buddha’s teaching). Chronic illnesses or conditions - such as arthritis, heart disease, and diabetes (three among dozens) - while not immediately life-threatening, are life-disrupting and stressful. The book is unique in that each chapter contains easy-to-learn tools and practices to help the chronically ill and their caregivers live skilfully, maintain equanimity, and even find joy despite the profound changes in their lives. A recurring theme in the book is that, although one’s body may be sick, one’s mind can be at peace. Some of the practices presented are traditionally Buddhist. Others I devised after becoming ill. Two are from the work of Byron Katie. Each practice is illustrated with examples from my own experience, so the book is also highly personal. The practices are intended to help with the following types of challenges: Suffering due to the relentlessness of physical symptoms; Blaming oneself for being sick; Cursory or dismissive treatment by doctors and medical professionals; The inability to visit with friends, participate in family gatherings, and take part in other social events; Feeling ignored by family or friends; Suffering due to uncertainty about the future; Coping with the disappointment of failed treatments; Caretaker burnout. At the end of the book is a handy reference guide, summarizing the specific tools and practices that can help with each of the above challenges. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Intimacy after breast cancer. Dealing with your body, relationships and sex'

Intimacy after breast cancer. Dealing with your body, relationships and sex (2010)

Square One Press

Congratulations! You survived breast cancer. This should be a time to celebrate - so why do you feel so empty and alone? Medical professionals prepare you for surgery and other treatments, but do not always address your emotional and sexual health. In 'Intimacy After Breast Cancer', breast cancer survivor Gina Maisano honestly discusses the sensitive issues of self-esteem, body image, and sexuality to help you become the total woman you still are. Part One begins by examining the emotions experienced by breast cancer survivors, including anxiety and fear of recurrence. It then offers guidance on regaining the confidence to start living again. The mental and physical effects of post-surgical medications are discussed, along with solutions for maintaining optimum health. Part Two focuses on rediscovering your sexuality. In a compassionate manner, it addresses the issues that most often challenge both single and married women and presents suggestions for overcoming them. Love and intimacy do not have to end with a breast cancer diagnosis. In 'Intimacy After Breast Cancer', Gina Maisano will help you rediscover the joys of being a woman. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Coping with the psychological effects of cancer'

Coping with the psychological effects of cancer (2010)

Sheldon Press

Cancer affects more than one in three of us. Until recently, the emphasis has been on battling cancer physically. Today, there is increasing recognition of the emotional aspect of having cancer, and survivorship and its issues are hot topics. This book tackles a sensitive subject in an upfront and practical way that acknowledges the uncomfortable and painful emotions associated with cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The psychological impact of breast cancer: a psychologist's insights as a patient'

The psychological impact of breast cancer: a psychologist's insights as a patient (2010)

Radcliffe Publishing

What is it like to experience breast cancer? This book presents rare and valuable insights into the impact of diagnosis, treatment and prognosis from a woman who has experienced breast cancer as both patient and as health professional. It informs and educates readers about the psychological realities of living with breast cancer, of treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy, and the impact of social and historical attitudes to the breast and breast cancer on a woman's experience of the disease. The conflicts Cordelia Galgut experienced between conventional wisdom and her own first-hand experience are explored vividly and reflectively. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Looking after my balls'

Looking after my balls (2009)

Books Beyond Words

It is important for every man to check his balls (testicles) regularly and to see his doctor immediately if he finds any changes that are not normal for him. You can use pictures and information in this book to help men with intellectual disabilities to learn more about their testicles and about how to look after them. The pictures tell the story of Tom, who finds a lump while checking his balls in the shower. We follow him as he seeks help from his GP, has tests and hears that the lump is not due to cancer. The pictures are designed to help the reader to ask questions or shake their concerns. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The spare room'

The spare room (2009)

Canongate Books Ltd

Helen has little idea what lies ahead when she offers her spare room to an old friend of fifteen years. Nicola has arrived in the city for treatment for cancer. Sceptical of the medical establishment, placing all her faith in an alternative health centre, Nicola is determined to find her own way to deal with her illness, regardless of the advice that Helen can offer. In the weeks that follow, Nicola's battle against her cancer will turn not only her own life upside down but also those of everyone around her. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Am I going to die?'

Am I going to die? (2009)

Books Beyond Words

John has a terminal illness. This book tells his story, dealing with both physical deterioration and the emotional aspects of dying in an honest and moving way. John is shown getting weaker and needing more help. He looks back at his life and makes choices about how to spend his time. The pictures highlight the importance of going on special outings, of remembering good times, and of saying proper goodbyes to family and friends. The final images show John dying at home. Guidelines are provided (as text at the back) for carers and supporters, health and other professionals who provide support to people with learning disabilities who are terminally ill. Lists of other helpful written resources and relevant organisations are also given. Although this story is fictional, it is based on the real life experiences of ten people with learning disabilities who had a terminal illness. They participated in the Veronica Project, a research project conducted by St George’s Hospital, London and funded by Cancer Research UK. The book draws on what was important for the participants when they were ill and dying and demonstrates best practice as identified by them. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The selfish pig's guide to caring'

The selfish pig's guide to caring (2009)

Piatkus (Little, Brown Book Group)

Six million people in the UK provide unpaid care for disabled or elderly relatives or neighbours, often unnoticed. Their job is long, lonely and hard, yet there is limited support and no formal training. As a result, carers suffer frequent damage to physical and mental health and are liable to feelings of guilt brought on by fatigue and isolation. Hugh Marriott, a carer himself, has written this book for them - and also for the rest of us who hadn't realised what went on behind those closed doors. The Selfish Pig's Guide to Caring airs topics such as sex, thoughts of murder, coping with incontinence and dealing with friends and officials who fail to understand. It's a must-read for anyone involved with caring. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A guide to examining your testicles [Multimedia pack]'

A guide to examining your testicles [Multimedia pack] (2008)

Family Advice and Information Resource

This interactive CD helps men check their testicles for early signs of cancer. The pack also includes the 'guide to examining your testicles' booklet.

Cover image of 'The poetry cure'

The poetry cure (2005)

Bloodaxe Books

This book of poems is for all of us who go through illness, deal with doctors, hospitals, and experiences such as bereavement and ageing, and who struggle to find language to describe the suffering we have to go through. Medical language baffles and alienates us. It's a harsh, unforgiving vocabulary that often seems to bear no relationship to our own emotional predicament. In this uplifting anthology we see how poetry can give us metaphors and images to help us understand our feelings and communicate them to people around us. This is a book that should be in every waiting-room, and should be by the bed of every GP and consultant. It may inspire you to write poetry, and also help you to find order in the chaos of ill health. By giving us words, poetry can help cure us. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Getting on with cancer'

Getting on with cancer (2002)

Books Beyond Words

"Books beyond words" is a series of picture books that has been developed for people who have difficulty reading and who can understand pictures better than words, and to enable discussion about difficult topics. Supporting text and guidelines are also provided for carers, supporters and professionals. When Veronica's doctor told her she had cancer, she was confused and terrified. Then he told her some cancers can be cured. `Getting on with cancer' tells the story of Veronica, a woman with Down's Syndrome, who has cancer. She has surgery and also radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The book deals honestly with the unpleasant side of treatment. It is designed to be used as a counselling tool by anyone working with people who have both learning disabilities and cancer. It will also be valuable for other client groups, for example, people with chronic mental health problems. The book ends on a positive note. Included in the book is Veronica Donaghey's story 'It's not all bad news', written in her own words. There are also guidelines for carers/supporters and for healthcare professionals, and information on relevant resources and helpful organisations. (Publisher)

Sorry, no publications found.
Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 7 days a week, 8am-8pm