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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 113

Cover image of 'Coping with the psychological effects of illness. Strategies to manage anxiety and depression'

Coping with the psychological effects of illness. Strategies to manage anxiety and depression (2015)

Sheldon Press

Sudden, severe ill health comes as a shock and presents several challenges, most notably, loss of confidence. Suddenly people are afraid to take exercise, have sex or even go to the shops. Their entire self-image takes a battering, and this roller-coaster of uncertainty often leads to anxiety and depression. This book looks at the learning curve involved in sudden and chronic illness, and explores key ways to build psychological resilience during this time of challenge. Whether it concerns cancer, heart disease, diabetes, or a mental health condition, it explores the common psychological issues that arise when someone’s usual health and routine are disrupted, and discusses the impact of illness on relationships and family. Drawing on CBT techniques, it offers practical self-help strategies to help deal with peoples changed expectations of themselves, and with the related lifestyle changes. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Gifted by grief. A true story of cancer, loss and rebirth'

Gifted by grief. A true story of cancer, loss and rebirth (2015)

Living Well Publications

Is it really possible to be grateful for your husband’s death? This is the message that ultimately comes over in Jane Duncan Rogers’ book Gifted By Grief: A True Story of Cancer, Loss and Rebirth. Told through the medium of blog posts by her husband in his last year, her own journal entries, and a heartfelt, poignant and riveting narrative, Jane invites the reader into her grief-stricken world. Where this might be harrowing, it is found to be ironic; where there might be pointlessness and despair, gifts are found, inspiring the reader find the gifts in their own life situation. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A sky of diamonds: a story for children about loss, grief and hope'

A sky of diamonds: a story for children about loss, grief and hope (2015)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

When Mia learns that her mother has died, all the colour in her world changes to a dreary grey. She feels guilty, angry, sad and lost (sometimes all at once!), and she doesn't know what to do to feel better. Little by little, with the help of her Dad, Mia learns how to cope with her difficult feelings. Together, they remember her mother by creating memory boxes, and they even get rid of anger by crazily sloshing paints and punching holes in newspapers! In the end, Mia finds her own, very special way of coping. When she feels sad or lonely, she looks up to the stars. Full of practical strategies, this storybook for children aged 5-9 addresses loss, grief and hope. Written from the perspective of Mia who has experienced the sudden death of her mother, it covers the different stages of grief, from initial disbelief, anger and sadness to resolution and hope. The book highlights the importance of giving children the time and space to work through their feelings and provides a host of thoughtful activities to help them cope. It also addresses some of the questions children commonly ask about death. Uniquely illustrated, this book will be an invaluable resource for anyone supporting a grieving child, especially bereavement counsellors, social workers, teachers and other school staff, as well as parents. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'Bald is better with earrings. A survivor’s guide to getting through breast cancer'

Bald is better with earrings. A survivor’s guide to getting through breast cancer (2015)

HarperCollins

When Andrea Hutton was diagnosed with breast cancer, she wanted to know everything. She voraciously read books, articles, and websites and talked to everyone she knew. But nothing prepared her for what the surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation would feel like. Were there tricks that could ease her pain and discomfort? What was “fatigue” and how would it affect her? At what exact moment would her hair fall out and how? Hutton wanted what she could not find: a clear how-to guide for the cancer girl she had become. Bald Is Better with Earrings is Hutton’s answer for women diagnosed with breast cancer: a straightforward handbook, leavened with humor and inspiration, to shepherd them though the experience. Warm and down-to-earth, Hutton explains what to expect and walks you through this intense and emotional process: tests, surgery, chemo, losing your hair and shaving your head, being bald, radiation treatments. Hutton offers a wealth of invaluable advice—from tricks for surviving chemo, to treating your skin during radiation, to keeping track of meds—and includes a practical list of tips for each stage of the process at the end of every chapter. Compassionate, friendly, and shaped by Hutton’s first-hand knowledge, Bald Is Better with Earrings is the comprehensive, essential companion for anyone dealing with breast cancer. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Under cover of darkness. How I blogged my way through mantle cell lymphoma'

Under cover of darkness. How I blogged my way through mantle cell lymphoma (2015)

O-Books (John Hunt Publishing)

Not only is this book an inspiring survival manual for cancer patients, but its humour and objectivity make it a choice read for anyone who enjoys real-life drama and pathos. Diagnosed with Mantle Cell Lymphoma in 2012 the author resorted to a blog to keep in touch with friends, and unwittingly ended up writing about the good, the bad and the ugly side of cancer, which attracted many followers. Is there a good? Very possibly. Bad and ugly, definitely. There is also an extremely funny side - wry observations that brought humour into an otherwise bleak landscape which included chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant. The author is also blessed with a big following from the Mind, Body, Spirit community of which she is a part (including Judy Hall, Anita Moorjani, Dolores Ashcroft-Nowicki); from this outpouring of expert support came advice on nutrition and alternative therapies which help to make this an invaluable source of information for cancer patients and their carers. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Pear shaped'

Pear shaped (2015)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Adam is a 44-year-old London lawyer and father of three. Completely out of the blue, and for no reason other than sheer dumb chance, he was diagnosed with a rare and aggressive brain tumour. Adam has endured radiotherapy and chemotherapy which were preceded by major brain surgery to remove the tumour - helpfully described by his surgeon as being the size and shape of a pear. Using the blackest of humour, this book charts Adam's journey from normality to having a disease regularly described as a “death sentence”. How will he cope with the treatment? How will his relationship with family and friends be affected? Most important of all, how will his hair come through this? Quite simply, it is the funniest book so far this year about brain cancer. Warning - this book is intended for mature audiences due to the subject matter and use of strong language. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'My daddy had cancer'

My daddy had cancer (2015)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

A gentle caring book about a boy, Bertie, whose daddy dies from cancer. This book is for use by a parent, grandparent, teacher or counsellor or anyone who is caring for a child during a difficult time. This book is not intended for a child to read alone, but in a loving nurturing environment to enable the child to share their thoughts and feelings about their loss. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The Royal Marsden cancer cookbook'

The Royal Marsden cancer cookbook (2015)

Kyle Books

The book is divided into three: a detailed section by Clare Shaw about diet and cancer and the problems you may face during treatment (like loss of appetite, nausea, sore mouth, change of taste); recipes to cook during treatment, which are nutritionally beneficial and wholesome enough to keep you strong even if you can’t eat too much; and a section of recipes for after treatment aimed at keeping you healthy. These recipes are designed to serve smaller portions and two people as well as for families, and there are lots of tips about budgeting, leftovers and freezing. Clare and Catherine want to emphasise that you don’t have to cook ‘special’, separate meals for one, the rest of the family can eat in the same way, saving on time and stress as well as encouraging a healthier diet for all. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cancer survivorship coping tools - we'll get you through this'

Cancer survivorship coping tools - we'll get you through this (2015)

Ayni Books

Hearing the words “You have cancer” can be devastating - some cancer patients even say that the emotional pain and loss of certainty from hearing this are worse than the pains from the cancer, surgeries, radiation, chemotherapy, and other treatments. This is the intimate journey of a melanoma and breast cancer survivor who honestly, and sometimes even humorously, shares her own story and offers supportive emotional tools to help people diagnosed with cancer, and their loved ones and caregivers, work through the emotional pain and upheaval of a cancer diagnosis. You will be supported in knowing what it feels like to hear you have cancer and be given a variety of helpful ideas to start feeling better whether you are newly diagnosed, in treatment, or months or years after treatment. If you are a caregiver, friend, or family member who wants to help, you will get a better understanding of the cancer experience as well as tools to help the person you care about. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'My cancer journey. A rendezvous with myself'

My cancer journey. A rendezvous with myself (2015)

Balboa Press

My book is a candid narration of my encounter with breast cancer. It is the story of an ordinary woman who was put in extraordinary circumstances, and who undertook her cancer journey with the utmost courage. This memoir is not just about describing a difficult medical condition. It is about going through the experience, and emerging from it wiser and stronger. It is about using cancer as a life changing experience, despite all the trauma and the loss – and the change needn’t be for the worse. It is about understanding the choice that a human being has – the choice to accept what cannot be changed, and to use one of the toughest fights of life to evolve into a better person, irrespective of the prognosis. Pick up a copy to embark on a rendezvous with your inner self! (Author)

Cover image of 'There's something I've been dying to tell you'

There's something I've been dying to tell you (2014)

Coronet (Hodder & Stoughton)

In 2013 Lynda Bellingham was diagnosed with cancer. Having kept the details of her illness private, now for the very first time Lynda talks with beautiful poignancy about her life since her diagnosis, her family and how together they came to terms with a future they hadn't planned. Having been told that she only has a matter of months left to live and writing this in what will be her final days, There's something I’ve been dying to tell you is a brave and brutally honest memoir and yet Lynda also manages to spread her infectious warmth and humour, bringing light to a very dark time. Woven into this very moving and brave story are extraordinary, colourful tales of her acting and family life that will enlighten and entertain as well as the journey that Lynda has taken to find the family of her birth father having already suffered heartache in her search for her birth mother. In the search for her father's family, Lynda finds a family with a history in entertainment showing that acting was always in the blood. Lynda Bellingham was a tremendously gifted storyteller with a rich collection of tales of love, loss and laughter and this book brings her kind heart, courage and emotion to the page in vivid detail. Lynda's story is an affecting and at times heart-breaking one but it is so often laugh-out-loud too and ultimately the way Lynda tells her life story will serve as a great inspiration. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Getting off the emotional roller coaster of cancer. A toolbox for patients, survivors, family members and caregivers'

Getting off the emotional roller coaster of cancer. A toolbox for patients, survivors, family members and caregivers (2014)

Anchor Rose Publishing

You sit across the desk from your doctor – and you learn you have cancer. As though you just got on a racing roller coaster, you’re suddenly overwhelmed with fear, anxiety, grief and depression. The journey with cancer begins. Are you prepared emotionally? Medical treatments for cancer continue to advance, yet tools to help cancer patients address their emotional wellbeing still lag behind. Physicians and psychologists now realize that healing is often greatly improved when both the physical and emotional needs of patients are met. In Getting Off the Emotional Roller Coaster of Cancer, cancer psychotherapist Niki Barr gently guides you through diagnosis, medical treatment and beyond. This groundbreaking book gives you effective, easy-to-use tools to manage your journey through cancer with confidence and calm. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Travels with Cookie. Narrowboat cruising with a cat'

Travels with Cookie. Narrowboat cruising with a cat (2014)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Between 2004 and 2006, David Thomas experienced a series of disasters in his life, culminating in being told that he only had a short time left to live. Rather than sinking into despair as many people would, he decided to fulfil his lifelong dream of living on a canal boat, while he still could. So he bought a narrowboat, LadyRiverMouse (an anagram of 'Live Your Dreams') with a view to spending the rest of his limited life cruising the canals and rivers of England. Naturally, he had to take the love of his life with him – a rather bad-tempered fluffy white prima donna of a cat called Cookie. Cookie was an indoor cat who had rarely been outside, never mind living on a boat, where according to David dogs are usually the pets of choice. Would it work out? David didn't know, but as he put it, “I wasn't going anywhere without my beloved Cookie”. The remainder of the book is an account of the few years David spent travelling through the waterways of his native land. Many people live on boats; few cruise as extensively as David did – to London, along the Thames, up to Wales, then tackling the wild and often desolate rivers of North West England. A beginner to boating when he started, David learned much as time went on, mainly by having numerous – and often hair-raising - adventures. So did Cookie, who contrived to get lost, fall in the water on a number of occasions, and generally use up most of her cat's nine lives. Finally David met Helen, a helicopter instructor, writer, and – most importantly – cat lover. They fell in love, and David's life began to change yet again, leading to the eventual sale of LadyRiverMouse and a new life in the Peak District for David and Cookie. David knows about boating, has an eye for detail, and is also an astute observer of his fellow men and women, both on and off the waterways. Therefore this book will clearly be of interest to those who have ever travelled on the canals or done any other boating, anyone who loves travel of any type, or simply the armchair traveller who enjoys reading about others' adventures. But “Travels With Cookie” is more than just another boating or travel book. It is a tale of bereavement and divorce, of terminal illness and despair, and finally of romance, a seemingly miraculous cure, and a new life. Hence it should appeal to anyone who likes human interest stories of any type. And of course – as Cookie herself would tell you if she could speak - it i

Cover image of 'Laryngectomy is not a tragedy. An introduction to pharyngeal speech'

Laryngectomy is not a tragedy. An introduction to pharyngeal speech (2013)

Cancer Laryngectomee Trust

This updated edition contains the original chapters written by Sydney Norgate in 1989 plus additional material by Dr Nicola Oswald on current speech methods and future developments. It will provide help and encouragement to all laryngectomy patients and their families. It is full of practical advice and information, as well as reassurance. The author, who had himself had his larynx removed, wrote from personal experience of the problems caused by the loss of normal speech, and describes the method of learning to use substitute pharyngeal speech. Written in a straightforward, humorous style and illustrated with cartoons 'Laryngectomy is not a Tragedy' has proved to be a valuable source of advice and inspiration to all those who face this operation. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The hare who lost her hair'

The hare who lost her hair (2013)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

This one-of-a-kind story is a message of hope for young children and families who are undergoing chemotherapy or any difficult struggle. Without words like cancer and chemo, the kid-friendly tale follows a brave hare on her courageous journey to overcome illness. A mysterious, healing stream offers the potential to get well, but there are surprising side effects that will challenge the hare's strength and determination. This book is about believing wishes can come true even in the most extreme circumstances. Ideal for early stage cancers due to the message of survival. Perfect for pairing with honest discussions about your personal situation. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cellmates. Our lessons in cancer, life, love and loss'

Cellmates. Our lessons in cancer, life, love and loss (2013)

Saraband

I'm Rose. John and I shared nearly eight years of our lives together. For the last three years of our relationship cancer anchored us together. That's not as grim as it might sound. This is our story. A story of how two ordinary people live with the diagnosis, the check-ups, the disappointments, the relief, the questions, the answers, the operations, the recovery, the emergencies, the denial, the acceptance, the anger, the pain, the loss, the love, the fear, the frustration - and the happiness. Shortly before he died, John made Rose promise to share their story - to tell what they had learned, practically and emotionally, and convey the hope they found even in the darkest of times. He had discovered her hidden stash of letters and diary entries, which she'd been writing to keep herself sane, neither censoring nor intending them to be read. The result is an astonishing, searingly honest, real-time account that reveals our profound capacity for love and how the human spirit can endure the most harrowing of tests to emerge dauntless, flying free. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'My left boob. A cancer diary'

My left boob. A cancer diary (2013)

Book Guild Publishing

Diagnosed with breast cancer in her fifties, award-winning actress and glamour girl-about-town Sally Farmiloe-Neville decided to keep a diary. This is the frank and honest account of her fight to beat the tumour within, retain as much of her left breast as possible - and carry on working meanwhile. Filled with helpful advice to fellow sufferers based on her own experiences, needle-phobic Sally documents her treatment as she goes through the horrors of chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy, helped by a healer, a hypnotherapist and a special diet. When her trademark 'big' hair falls out she reveals how she coped by getting ‘Crystal’, a long blonde NHS wig that wowed every man she met. Her family and friends - including many famous household names - are by her side throughout, but many of them have fought their own battles with the big C and Sally documents their stories, too. Always upbeat, never sorry for herself, this is the courageous tale of one woman's struggle to regain her health. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Chemo cookery club'

Chemo cookery club (2013)

John Blake Publishing

Chemo Cookery Club is packed with delicious recipes to help make everyday food a positive part of life for cancer sufferers and their carers. With tempting treats and healthy food ideas, the emphasis is on the nutritional values that can make a difference, but most importantly this is a book that lifts the spirits - especially when food and diet can become a bit tricky. If you or someone you love are going through treatment, this book will help you create delicious meals and snacks that tantalise the tastebuds no matter how experienced - or otherwise - you are in the kitchen. Penny Ericson, experienced cook and carer, celebrates everyday meals and how they contribute to wellness, both physically and emotionally. If you're struggling with loss of appetite, wondering how to get more iron into your diet, wanting to relieve 'metal mouth' or dismayed that the foods you used to love now seem boring and tasteless as a result of treatment, Penny can help. Nutritional information and recipe analysis has been contributed by leading cancer research dietician Barbara Parry MSc PD, and the book has been enthusiastically endorsed by major cancer charities. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'My father’s arms are a boat'

My father’s arms are a boat (2012)

Enchanted Lion Books

It's quieter than it's ever been. Unable to sleep, a young boy climbs into his father's arms. Feeling the warmth and closeness of his father, he begins to ask questions about the birds, the foxes, and whether his mom will ever wake up. They go outside under the starry sky. Loss and love are as present as the white spruces, while the father's clear answers and assurances calm his worried son. Here we feel the cycles of life and life's continuity, even in the face of absence and loss, so strongly and clearly that we know at the end that everything will, somehow, be all right. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Missing mummy'

Missing mummy (2012)

Macmillan Children's Books

Written and illustrated by the talented and award-winning author-illustrator Rebecca Cobb, this extraordinary book deals with the loss of a parent from a child's point of view. Perfectly pitched text and evocative artwork explore the many emotions a bereaved child may experience, from anger to guilt and from sadness to bewilderment. And importantly, the book also focuses on the positive - the recognition that the child is still part of a family, and that his memories of his mother are to be treasured. Beautifully illustrated with moments of wonderful warmth and the gentlest humour, Missing Mummy is a touching, honest and helpful book that approaches a difficult subject with great integrity. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A monster calls'

A monster calls (2012)

Walker Books

The monster showed up after midnight. As they do. But it isn't the monster Conor's been expecting. He’s been expecting the one from his nightmare, the one he’s had nearly every night since his mother started her treatments, the one with the darkness and the wind and the screaming. This monster is something different. Something ancient, something wild. And it wants the most dangerous thing of all from Conor. It wants the truth. Patrick Ness spins a tale from the final idea of Siobhan Dowd, whose premature death from cancer prevented her from writing it herself. Darkly mischievous and painfully funny, 'A Monster Calls' is an extraordinarily moving novel of coming to terms with loss from two of our finest writers for young adults. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Chocolate chipped. A smelly book about grief'

Chocolate chipped. A smelly book about grief (2011)

Grief Encounter Project

Chocolate Chipped tells the unique story of a young boy named Charlie and his grieving over his Dad’s death. Using real smells and Scratch & Sniff in the pages to help evoke memories, this book explores the sensitive subject of grief in an honest, engaging – and sometimes even humorous – way. Chocolate Chipped can help adults to talk openly to children about the loss of a loved one. It can be read by bereaved children to help them understand their own feelings and by other children to help them appreciate what a friend might be going through. Teachers, educational specialists as well as Bereavement Counsellors would also gain from using this book. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Being Sarah'

Being Sarah (2011)

Wordscapes

Being Sarah is Sarah Horton's personal story about breast cancer. As the shock of diagnosis subsides, Sarah starts looking for a treatment plan that suits her, searching for choices, and asks questions about all the medical drugs and treatment offered to her, from chemotherapy to hormone treatment. There are so many questions: in a field where so little is certain, what's best for Sarah? Why do we concentrate on cure rather than prevention? Is our terror about breast cancer sanitised by the 'pink' movement? And will I die? And there aren’t always answers. From the minutiae of getting through each day to the wider feelings of rage, hope, sadness, fear, loss, joy and helplessness, Being Sarah is about life, death, questions, options and choices. Breast cancer statistics in the UK are alarming, and the politics surrounding the illness perplexing. Mortality rates are falling, but diagnoses are rising. One in every nine women can now expect to be diagnosed with breast cancer at some time in her life, and - while we’re getting better at surviving - it’s happening more and more frequently. Sarah Horton is one of the 46,000 women diagnosed with breast cancer in the UK every year. This is her story. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Who will do my hair?'

Who will do my hair? (2010)

Ulster Cancer Foundation

This illustrated book for young children aims to help them understand and prepare for the death of a parent or significant adult.

Cover image of 'Beyond the pink moon. A memoir of legacy, loss and survival'

Beyond the pink moon. A memoir of legacy, loss and survival (2010)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

In this touching, frank and informative memoir, Nicki Boscia Durlester intimately chronicles her transformational journey after being diagnosed with breast cancer. Her story begins with her mother, who was diagnosed with the disease in 1962: a time when breast cancer was only discussed behind closed doors, and long before women took an active role in their diagnosis and treatment. Nicki provides unique insight into being part of a large Italian-American family afflicted with the BRCA2 gene, and shares poignant stories about her mother and aunts who faced breast and ovarian cancer with extraordinary grace and courage. Nicki writes candidly about her frustration in finding the right team of doctors as well as the highs and lows of her journey, sharing humor and heart along the way. She puts a human face on statistics ranking breast cancer as the second leading cause of cancer deaths in women in the United States. This deeply moving story of legacy, loss and ultimately survival is told through the eyes of a daughter who shared an unbreakable bond with her mother. As she travels the scary, unpredictable road through her own diagnosis, treatment and recovery, Nicki discovers the most difficult challenge she faces becomes the most spiritually transcendent experience of her life. This Special Edition of Beyond the Pink Moon includes an Afterword from the author. A portion of the proceeds from sales of this book will be donated to breast cancer research. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The heart and the bottle'

The heart and the bottle (2010)

HarperCollins Children's Books

Award-winning picture book star Oliver Jeffers explores themes of love and loss in this life-affirming and uplifting tale. Once there was a girl whose life was filled with wonder at the world around her…Then one day something happened that made the girl take her heart and put it in a safe place. However, after that it seemed that the world was emptier than before. But would she know how to get her heart back? In this deeply moving story, Oliver Jeffers deals with the weighty themes of love and loss with an extraordinary lightness of touch and shows us, ultimately, that there is always hope. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Connecting through compassion. Guidance for family and friends of a brain cancer patient'

Connecting through compassion. Guidance for family and friends of a brain cancer patient (2010)

Cancer Lifeline Publications

This book candidly discusses the challenges of living with the personality and behavior changes brain cancer brings, and offers practical tools to make the journey easier. Joni Aldrich and Neysa Peterson have each cared for a spouse with a brain illness. They have combined their insights in this practical, straight-talking guide. Readers will learn: symptoms a brain cancer patient may experience; how to create and maintain a warm, comfortable and safe environment; methods to use if communication becomes an issue; how to deal with changes in personality, behavior, and emotions, including loss of social inhibition skills; how to handle issues related to changes in memory and the resulting confusion; how to work through indifference, sadness, and depression towards some peace; how to cope with self-destructive behavior-safety is your number one concern; how to have end-of-life discussions and fulfil final wishes. When a family member or friend is diagnosed with cancer, life as you know it has ended. Not only must you face the chaos of doctors' visits, exhausting treatments, and sleepless nights, you must try to savor every precious moment with your loved one. When the diagnosis is brain cancer, you must endure all this plus one more challenge: the person you love may look the same, and sound the same-but he or she is not the same. His or her personality may change in extreme ways. A kind and loving person may become angry and say hurtful things. A warm, upbeat person may withdraw or behave in self-destructive ways. The essence of your loved one can disappear, even as he or she continues to live. With the tools in this book, you can continue to love and be loved during this difficult crisis. 'The last weeks of Gordon's life were spent with someone that I barely knew and didn't know how to approach. It took me two years of counseling to get through the scars. It didn't have to be that way for me. And it certainly doesn't have to be that way for you.' Joni Aldrich (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Remembering...'

Remembering... (2009)

Child Bereavement Charity

A memory/keepsake book for bereaved children for when someone special in their life has died, illustrated with watercolours by Daniel Postgate and written by Dianne Leutner. "Remembering" is a beautiful memory/keepsake book for children when someone special in their life has died. The outstanding illustrations by award-winning Daniel Postgate are light-hearted yet thoughtful. It's part book, part scrapbook, and was created to hellp keep a child's memories alive after the loss of someone special and to give children a place to return to whenever they wish. For ages 10 and under. This book received a 'Highly Commended' BMA Patient Information award. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'I miss you. A first look at death'

I miss you. A first look at death (2009)

Wayland Books

This reassuring picture book explores the difficult issue of death for young children. Children's feelings and questions about this sensitive subject are looked at in a simple but realistic way. This book helps them to understand their loss and come to terms with it. Written by a trained psychotherapist, journalist and parent, and illustrated by an experienced children's book artist, this is part of an acclaimed and successful series of picture-book non-fiction for Early Years. Books in the series give advice and promote interaction between children, parents, and teachers on a wide variety of personal, social and emotional issues. They are excellent tools for teachers to use during classroom discussions. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Saving my arse. A story of cancers, colons and Singapore noodles'

Saving my arse. A story of cancers, colons and Singapore noodles (2008)

Mark Davies

If you or a family member or friend is diagnosed with Bowel/colon cancer then this book will hopefully be of some use and comfort. But I really wrote this book for all of those people, who thought like me that cancer and its treatments begins and ends with losing your hair and sitting around in hospitals like a displaced Hare Krishna convention, whilst having an uncontrollable urge to run the marathon. I want to allay, if at all possible, some the fears that we all have of cancer without boring anyone to tears or being over emotional. More people than ever are surviving, and go on to live a normal life. I am not a doctor, nor have I ever had any medical training, so I found that I didn't really understand a lot of what was being talked about by the doctors. Questions like: What is Chemotherapy and what does it do? What happens during Radiotherapy? (Publisher)

Cover image of 'What can I do to help? 75 practical ideas for family and friends from cancer's frontline'

What can I do to help? 75 practical ideas for family and friends from cancer's frontline (2005)

Short Books

'I count myself the luckiest and unluckiest woman in London.' Deborah Hutton's discovery that the niggling cough which had been troubling her for a couple of months was actually an aggressive lung cancer that had already invaded her bones and lymphatic system marked the beginning of a brand-new learning curve - a personal odyssey that taught her to let go of her super-competent I-can-handle-it-myself persona and gratefully accept the huge amount of help beamed at her by her close-knit family and 'world class' network of friends and neighbours. From her own experience and out of her conversations with fellow members of the Cancer Club - 'the only club I can think of which is both rigorously exclusive and which has no waiting list, ever' - comes this anthology of supremely practical examples of ways in which friends and family, often themselves reeling from the shock of the diagnosis and feeling just as helpless and at a loss as to know what to do, can make a real, substantial difference. 'What can I do to help?' she writes. Well, stand by, because the answer is 'Plenty'. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The day the sea went out and never came back'

The day the sea went out and never came back (2003)

Speechmark Publishing Ltd

"The day the sea went out and never came back" is a story for children who have lost someone they love. Eric is a sand dragon who loves the sea very much. Each day, he watches it going out and coming back. His sea is beautiful indeed to him. But one day, the sea goes out and does not come back. Eric waits and waits, but it does not come back. So he falls on the sand in terrible pain. It feels to him as if he has lost everything. After many bleak days, Eric sees a little wild flower. It is dying. Eric knows he must save it. He finds water. More and more flowers appear and so Eric starts to make a beautiful rock pool garden. And as he does, he finds the courage to feel the full pain of his loss, instead of closing his heart. He realises that his memories of his precious sea are like a special kind of treasure in his mind, a treasure he will never lose. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'When dinosaurs die. A guide to understanding death'

When dinosaurs die. A guide to understanding death (1998)

Little Brown and Company

No one can really understand death but to children, the passing away of a loved one can be especially perplexing and troublesome. This is true whether the loss is a classmate, friend, family member or pet. Here to offer advice and reassurance are some very wise dinosaurs. This succinct and thorough guide helps dispel the mystery and negative connotations associated with death, providing answers to some of the most-often asked questions and also explores the feelings we may have regarding the death of a loved one and the ways to remember someone after he or she has died. (Publisher)

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