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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 113

Cover image of 'Eat well during cancer. Helping you cope with common side-effects of cancer and cancer treatment'

Eat well during cancer. Helping you cope with common side-effects of cancer and cancer treatment (2018)

World Cancer Research Fund

This booklet is for people living with cancer and those having cancer treatment, who want to know more about how to cope with the common side-effects, but also want to follow as healthy a diet and lifestyle as possible. It is a general guide and not suitable for people who are eating very little, have lost a lot of weight unintentionally or are receiving palliative care, as they will need specialist information and advice. 

Cover image of 'Coping with common symptoms of lymphoma'

Coping with common symptoms of lymphoma (November 2018)

Lymphoma Action

This factsheet has general guidance for coping with some of the symptoms of lymphoma, including: swollen lymph nodes; fatigue;  weight loss; night sweats; itching; pain; skin symptoms; swollen arms or legs; and coping with your emotions.

Cover image of 'Symptoms of lymphoma'

Symptoms of lymphoma (November 2018)

Lymphoma Action

This information gives details about the symptoms of lymphoma and the possible reasons for them: B symptoms; swollen lymph nodes; fatigue; unexplained weight loss; night sweats; itching; fever; difficulty getting over infections; chest symptoms; abdominal (tummy) symptoms; pain; skin symptoms; brain and nerve symptoms; swelling in the arms or legs; anaemia (low red blood cells). 

Cover image of 'Zoledronic acid [Lithuanian]'

Zoledronic acid [Lithuanian] (December 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Information from the Macmillan Cancer Support website translated into Lithuanian. Zoledronic acid is a bisphosphonate that can be used to help prevent bone loss, reduce the risk of cancer spreading to the bones in women with early breast cancer, treat bone weakness or pain caused by myeloma or cancer that has spread to the bones (secondary bone cancer), or treat high levels of calcium in the blood. This factsheet describes how it is given and the possible side-effects.

Cover image of 'Preparing a child for loss'

Preparing a child for loss (April 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support|Winston's Wish

This booklet is written with the childhood bereavement charity, Winston’s Wish. It’s for parents or guardians who are near the end of life and aims to help you prepare and talk to a child or children about your death. Partners, grandparents and close family members may find it useful, too. It may also help you talk to children who are already dealing with the death of a family member. 

Cover image of 'In our own words. Parents talk about life after their child has died of cancer'

In our own words. Parents talk about life after their child has died of cancer (January 2018)

CLIC Sargent

This booklet has been written for families whose children have cancer. It includes sections on the circles of grief, changes in grief over time, how relationships are affected, the dual process model of coping with grief, remembering your child, spirituality, and dealing with other people's responses. The text is interspersed with quotes from people whose child has died.

Cover image of 'Vision loss and brain tumours. What you need to know'

Vision loss and brain tumours. What you need to know (July 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This booklet summarises some of the key types of vision problems that may occur as a result of brain tumours or their treatment, and how to adapt to them. 

Cover image of 'A moment of grace. A story of love and loss'

A moment of grace. A story of love and loss (2018)

Ebury Press (Penguin Random House)

Patrick Dillon and Nicola Thorold were together for twenty-eight years. Patrick was an award-winning architect and writer and Nicola a leading figure in theatre, awarded an OBE for her contribution to the arts at London’s Roundhouse. Their two children were almost grown-up. Life was good. And then, in May 2015, Nicola was diagnosed with leukaemia. After several rounds of treatment, a bone marrow transplant and many waves of recovery and decline, she died thirteen months after her diagnosis. Six months later, at Christmas, Patrick started to write. A Moment of Grace is the searing, tender account of Patrick’s life with Nicola and her illness, and his life after her loss. But it is more than a story of illness and unbearable grief: it is a book of memory, of home, of family. It is a tale of the transfiguring power of love. Heartbreaking, life-affirming and truly unforgettable, A Moment of Grace is one man’s journey to find life after his wife’s death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Spoiler alert: the hero dies. A memoir of love, loss and other four-letter words'

Spoiler alert: the hero dies. A memoir of love, loss and other four-letter words (2018)

Atria Books (Simon and Schuster)

In this evocative and gorgeously wrought memoir reminiscent of Rob Sheffield’s Love Is a Mixtape and George Hodgman’s Bettyville, Michael Ausiello—a respected TV columnist and founder and editor-in-chief of TVLine.com—remembers his late husband, and the lessons, love, and laughter that they shared throughout their fourteen years together. For the past decade, TV fans of all stripes have counted upon Michael Ausiello’s insider knowledge to get the scoop on their favorite shows and stars. From his time at Soaps in Depth to his influential stints at TV Guide and Entertainment Weekly to his current role as founder and editor-in-chief of the wildly popular website TVLine.com, Michael has established himself as the go-to expert when it comes to our most popular form of entertainment. What many of his fans don’t know, however, is that while his professional life was in full swing, Michael had to endure the greatest of personal tragedies: his husband, Kit Cowan, was diagnosed with a rare and very aggressive form of neuroendocrine cancer. Over the course of eleven months, Kit and Michael did their best to combat the deadly disease, but Kit succumbed to his illness in February 2015. In this heartbreaking and darkly hilarious memoir, Michael tells the story of his harrowing and challenging last year with Kit while revisiting the thirteen years that preceded it, and how the undeniably powerful bond between him and Kit carried them through all manner of difficulty—always with laughter front and center in their relationship. Instead of a tale of sadness and loss, Spoiler Alert: The Hero Dies is an unforgettable, inspiring, and beautiful testament to the resilience and strength of true love. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The pond'

The pond (2018)

Graffeg Limited

The Pond is a touching picture book about a young boy, and his family, overcoming the loss of his father. This colourful, emotional book is filled with natural imagery, and will teach children not only about death and loss, but the importance of the natural world. From Nicola Davies and Cathy Fisher, the duo behind the beautiful children’s book Perfect. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'All the time we thought we had'

All the time we thought we had (2018)

Polygon (Birlinn Imprint)

How do you start a new life when the person you love is about to die? At the age of thirty-six, Gordon Darroch's wife was diagnosed with breast cancer. It was a devastating blow just as he, and their two children with autism, were preparing to move to her native Holland. Eighteen months later, as their plans seemed to be back on course, came the second blow: Magteld was terminally ill and possibly had only a few months to live. As her health rapidly deteriorated, they became caught up in a race against time to get a dying mother home and give their children a future in a country they hardly knew. How could they build a new life in the midst of grief and loss? How would their two sons adjust to such enormous changes? And what would remain of Magteld once she was gone? All the Time We Thought We Had is a story of love and loss and a meditation on grief and memory. It's about how events shape our lives and how we cope with them. And it raises important questions about what we value in life and the legacies we leave behind. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A new kind of normal'

A new kind of normal (2018)

Self-published

They say there’s a book in all of us, but I doubt I would ever have written one had it not have been for my diagnosis of breast cancer in 2011. ‘A New Kind of Normal' is the story of my life up to and moving on from that moment. Growing up in the 60's, working through the 70's and 80's, juggling a career in TV and radio while bringing up three children and surviving two divorces. From the moment I knew what a bra was, I’d wanted breasts: I even crafted a pair of blue plasticine boobs for myself, as nature made me wait until I was 15 for breasts of my own! Through cancer I lost them both, and with the chemotherapy; all my hair, my fingernails, and more worryingly, a sense of whom I was. My hair grew back, as did my fingernails, but I still struggled with my identity. What I’ve written isn't a diary, nor a self-help guide, and it's not just about cancer. I’ve taken a really good look at the little girl I was and the woman I grew into, and why I went to such lengths to try and claw back some of what cancer had taken from me - it's not everyone's way I appreciate, and it’s been an interesting exercise trying to ascertain why it was mine! I’ve been honest, open, and meticulous when it comes to detail, as I firmly believe that if you take away the mystery, you can take away some of the fear. But there’s a lot to laugh about here too, as luckily I’ve always been able to see the funny side of a situation, preferring that to the occasional overwhelming despair I felt. In this book I've tried to move the disease away from the medical professionals and the hospitals, and to bring it into the day to day, because that's where it sits. Over the last seven years I’ve come to realise that the ripple effect of cancer is far reaching, affecting not just those of us living with it but everyone around us. 'A New Kind of Normal' gives an insight into my relationship with my then partner, now husband; my children and their reaction to my illness, my family and friends, my work colleagues, people who wrote to me, and the professionals who cared for me; everybody reacts differently. Breast cancer assaults your femininity - the treatment is tough and the surgery brutal.  It isn't easy, but it is possible, and I'd like to feel this book may be a source of comfort to anyone who's life is touched by breast cancer; maybe even help them to find their 'New Kind of Normal'. There are many things in life we may have to give up on, but hope is not one of them. (P

Cover image of 'Love and remission: my life, my man, my cancer'

Love and remission: my life, my man, my cancer (2018)

Trigger

In her mid-twenties, balancing a stable job and a partying lifestyle, Annie was also on the hunt for a man. She wanted to find Mr Right, get married, buy a house, and live the life she'd always wanted. But then one day, she found a lump ... Breast cancer. The two words that would derail Annie's life. Suddenly she realised how short her life had been, and the very idea of finding love seemed impossible. As her hair fell out, and her social life crumbled, her mental health deteriorated. She began to question if she would actually survive. Struggling with an identity crisis and worryingly low moods, she wondered if she'd ever be able to live the normal life that had been within her reach only months earlier. Love and Remission tells the tale of a young woman in search of love and mental wellbeing. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'My daddy is my superhero'

My daddy is my superhero (2018)

North Staffordshire Press

My Daddy Is My Superhero was inspired by Michaelagh's own experience of explaining her husband's brain tumour illness to her eldest son, and is intended to help begin conversations surrounding serious illness and death with young children. At its core, My Daddy Is My Superhero is about the loving relationship between a little boy and his dad. It is a story about love, fun, beauty, loss, sadness, memories and celebration. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The magical wood'

The magical wood (2018)

Lemon Drop Books

This is a story about loss, friendship and hope. The Magical Wood is set in a beautiful wood with a river wandering through. One cold and stormy day, the wind blew a terrible gale. The next day the tree family woke to find that Strongest Tree had fallen to the woodland floor and had sadly died. How would the tree family survive the seasons without the strength of Strongest Tree? Throughout each season the tree family are visited by a new animal, offering advice and support to the trees. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Goodbye Daisy'

Goodbye Daisy (2018)

Hashtag Press

Elsie and Daisy are best friends. They go to a special school, a school where the children have helpers and some of the children use wheels to get around. Elsie waits at the classroom door for her best friend to arrive every day. One day Daisy doesn’t arrive in school. All the grown-ups are crying; they are sad because Daisy has died. Elsie will never see her friend again. Elsie isn’t sad though, she is cross with her friend for not saying goodbye. Goodbye Daisy is based on Stephanie Nimmo’s own experiences of explaining to her daughter Daisy’s friends that Daisy had died. Aimed mainly at children with profound learning disabilities it is also a heart-warming social story and support guide about the death of a school friend that will support help parents, carers and professionals support a child through their loss and grief. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Gone in the morning. A writer’s journey of bereavement'

Gone in the morning. A writer’s journey of bereavement (2018)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

An exploration of death, bereavement and grief. This first hand account gives Geoff Mead's experience of responding to the loss of his wife from a brain tumour. Giving insight into the grieving process and how Geoff learned to manage his grief, this book will offer hope to anyone experiencing something similar. After coming to the realisation that mourning is a conscious process, to which we can apply creativity, passion and intelligence, Geoff explored the unknown territory of bereavement through his writing. The book shows how artful practice, such as writing, can help to make sense of our experience and navigate the wreckage of grief. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'Only one of me. A love letter from mum'

Only one of me. A love letter from mum (2018)

Graffeg Limited

'There's only one mum quite like me. I wish that there were two. I'd have more time to spend And I would spend it all with you.' Most of us can't imagine having the time we spend with our children or loved ones cut short, but this is the reality being faced by mother of two Lisa Wells, who was diagnosed with terminal bowel and liver cancer in December 2017 at the age of 31. The Only One of Me project grew from Lisa's determination to leave a lasting legacy for her daughters and her desire to help other families rally against the difficulties of loss. Only One of Me is the product of Lisa's lifelong love of writing and a newfound friendship with award-winning children's author Michelle Robinson. The two collaborated on this tender and moving rhyming poem, with charming illustrations by Catalina Echeverri, which is both a love letter to Lisa's own daughters and a testament to the unwavering strength of parental love, a timeless message for families facing the challenges of bereavement. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Only one of me. A love letter from dad'

Only one of me. A love letter from dad (2018)

Graffeg Limited

There's only one dad quite like me. I wish that there were two. I'd have more time to spend And I would spend it all with you. Most of us can't imagine having the time we spend with our children or loved ones cut short, but this is the reality being faced by mother of two Lisa Wells, who was diagnosed with terminal bowel and liver cancer in December 2017, at the age of 31. The Only One of Me project grew from Lisa's determination to leave a lasting legacy for her daughters and her desire to help other families rally against the difficulties of loss. Only One of Me is the product of Lisa's lifelong love of writing and a newfound friendship with award-winning children's author Michelle Robinson. The two collaborated on this tender and moving rhyming poem, with charming illustrations by Tim Budgen, which is both a love letter to Lisa's own daughters and a testament to the unwavering strength of parental love, a timeless message for families facing the challenges of bereavement. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Healthy eating guidelines. A guide to supporting health with good nutrition for people affected by cancer.'

Healthy eating guidelines. A guide to supporting health with good nutrition for people affected by cancer. (January 2017)

Penny Brohn UK

This booklet has been written for people affected by cancer or those wishing to reduce their risk of cancer. It contains general guidance and is not meant to be prescriptive. Everyone has unique nutritional requirements that depend, amongst other things, on genetic make up, medical history, stage of treatment, current state of health, and lifestyle, as well as tastes and preferences. The guidelines can be adapted to suit your own tastes and needs. If you have special dietary needs or problems with eating, swallowing, digestion, or weight loss you should seek further advice from a nutritionally-qualified health professional who has experience of working with people affected by cancer. 

Cover image of 'Signs and symptoms of cancer and how to reduce your risk'

Signs and symptoms of cancer and how to reduce your risk (March 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This leaflet explains how to recognise the early signs of cancer and how to reduce the risk. It describes the symptoms to look out for (unexplained bleeding, weight loss, lumps, pain) and how to reduce the risk by making lifestyle changes (smoking, diet, exercise, alcohol drinking and taking care in the sun).

Cover image of 'Recipes for people affected by cancer'

Recipes for people affected by cancer (December 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Guidance on eating a healthy diet and coping with poor appetite and weight loss, with plenty of recipes for people living with cancer or those caring for them.

Cover image of 'Cancer hates kisses'

Cancer hates kisses (2017)

Dial Books for Young Readers

Author Jessica Reid Sliwerski was diagnosed with breast cancer four months after giving birth to her daughter. And through all the stages of treatment--surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, losing her hair--she thought about how hard it would be to talk to your child about cancer while coping with it. She wrote this picture book to give other parents and their children an encouraging tool for having those conversations--a lovingly upbeat book that is also refreshingly authentic and straightforward. With its simple text and heartwarming illustrations, Cancer Hates Kisses is relatable to any type of cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Hair everywhere'

Hair everywhere (2017)

Istros Books

Hair Everywhere is the story of one family and how they manage to cope when the mother is diagnosed with cancer. It is a delicate tale that balances itself between the generations, revealing their strengths and weaknesses in times of trouble. It is also a story about how roles within a family can change when things become challenging, due to sickness or death, allowing some to grow and others to fade. Ultimately, this is a book about life; full of humour and absurdity as well as sadness, and set against an everyday background where the ordinary takes on new significance and colour. Tea Tulic’s debut novel is a brave glance at the human condition. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The owl at the window. A memoir of loss and hope'

The owl at the window. A memoir of loss and hope (2017)

Coronet (Hodder & Stoughton)

Award-winning TV comedy writer Carl Gorham's account of his bereavement is by turns deeply moving and darkly humorous. Part love story, part widower's diary, part tales of single parenting, it tells of his wife's cancer, her premature death and his attempts to rebuild his life afterwards with his six -year old daughter. Realised in a series of vivid snapshots, it takes the reader on an extraordinary journey from Oxford to Australia, from Norfolk to Hong Kong through fear, despair, pain and anger to hope, laughter and renewal. The Owl at the Window is a fresh and original exploration of what it means to lose a partner in your forties, and how Carl learned to live again. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Grief works. Stories of life, death and surviving'

Grief works. Stories of life, death and surviving (2017)

Penguin Life

Death affects us all. Yet it is still the last taboo in our society, and grief is still profoundly misunderstood... In Grief Works we hear stories from those who have experienced great love and great loss - and survived. Stories that explain how grief unmasks our greatest fears, strips away our layers of protection and reveals our innermost selves. Julia Samuel, a grief psychotherapist, has spent twenty-five years working with the bereaved and understanding the full repercussions of loss. This deeply affecting book is full of psychological insights on how grief, if approached correctly, can heal us. Through elegant, moving stories, we learn how we can stop feeling awkward and uncertain about death, and not shy away from talking honestly with family and friends. This extraordinary book shows us how to live and learn from great loss. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Naomi's story. Living with leukaemia'

Naomi's story. Living with leukaemia (2017)

Franklin Watts

This picture book uses the first-person testimony of Naomi, a 10-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Naomi explains what it was like to find out she had cancer, when she lost all her hair and what it was like spending so much time in hospital. The intimate and direct impact of using Naomi’s real first-person testimony encourages children to empathise with her situation, and to understand how some children’s lives are very different from their own. Naomi talks about school, family, friends and explains the confusion and chaos caused by cancer. This BAFTA award-winning story was originally produced as an animation for the BBC. Aimed at children aged 9 and up. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'We own the sky'

We own the sky (2017)

Trapeze (Orion)

Rob Coates can't believe his luck. There is Anna, his incredible wife, and most precious of all, Jack, their son, who makes every day an extraordinary adventure. Rob feels like he's won the lottery of life. Or rather - he did. Until the day it all changes when Anna becomes convinced there is something wrong with Jack. Now Rob sleepwalks through his days, unable to bridge the gulf that separates him from his wife, his son and the business of living. But he's determined to come to terms with what’s happened-and find a way back to life, and forgiveness. We Own the Sky will resonate with anyone who has ever suffered loss or experienced great love. Luke Allnutt shows that the journey from hope to despair and back is never as simple as we think, and that even the most thoroughly broken heart can learn to beat again. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Thinking out loud. Love, grief and being mum and dad'

Thinking out loud. Love, grief and being mum and dad (2017)

Hodder & Stoughton

In 2015, former England football star Rio Ferdinand suddenly and tragically lost his wife and soulmate Rebecca, aged 34, to cancer. It was a profound shock and Rio found himself struggling to cope not just with the pain of his grief, but also with his new role as both mum and dad to their three young children. Rio's BBC1 documentary, Being Mum and Dad, touched everyone who watched it and won huge praise for the honesty and bravery he showed in talking about his emotions and experiences. His book now shares the story of meeting, marrying and losing Rebecca, his own and the family's grief - as well as the advice and support that get him through each day as they strive to piece themselves back together. Thinking Out Loud is written in the hope that he can inspire others struggling with loss and grief to find the help they need through this most difficult of times. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Big tree is sick'

Big tree is sick (2017)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

Snibbles and Big Tree are best friends! They have always hung out together, and Snibbles loves Big Tree very much. When Big Tree unexpectedly falls ill with woodworm, Snibbles is very upset and angry. The illness is a very bad one and Big Tree does not feel well and doesn't want to play for a long time. Poor Snibbles! He wants Big Tree to get better, but he feels as if there is nothing he can do. What can Snibbles and his friends do to help Big Tree through his treatment and recovery? This beautifully illustrated storybook describes the anger and emotion that many children encounter when a close relative or friend is diagnosed with a long-term illness, such as cancer. The story of Big Tree depicts how things are often out of your control and sets out effective strategies for dealing with these emotions. This story features loveable characters and vivid illustrations, as well as activities for children aged 5+ to complete with their parents or professionals in times of illness and loss. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer-fighting kitchen. Nourishing, big-flavor recipes for cancer treatment and recovery'

The cancer-fighting kitchen. Nourishing, big-flavor recipes for cancer treatment and recovery (2017)

Ten Speed Press

This new and revised edition of the IACP award-winning cookbook brings the healing power of delicious, nutritious foods to those whose hearts and bodies crave a revitalizing meal, through 150 new and updated recipes. Featuring science-based, nutrient-rich recipes that are easy to prepare and designed to give patients a much-needed boost by stimulating appetite and addressing treatment side effects including fatigue, nausea, dehydration, mouth and throat soreness, taste bud changes, and weight loss. A step-by-step guide helps patients nutritionally prepare for all phases of treatment, and a full nutritional analysis accompanies each recipe. This remarkable resource teaches patients and caregivers how to use readily available powerhouse ingredients to build a symptom- and cancer-fighting culinary toolkit. Blending fantastic taste and meticulous science, these recipes for soups, vegetable dishes, proteins, and sweet and savory snacks are rich in the nutrients, minerals, and phytochemicals that help patients thrive during treatment. This second edition also includes a dozen new recipes--many of which are simpler and less complicated, for cancer patients to prepare on their low days--as well as a list of cancer-fighting foods that can be incorporated into everyday life without stepping behind the stove. Rebecca has also revised the text with the most up-to-date scientific research and includes a section on how friends and family can build a culinary support team. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'There is no good card for this: what to say and do when life is scary, awful, and unfair to people you love'

There is no good card for this: what to say and do when life is scary, awful, and unfair to people you love (2017)

HarperOne

The creator of the viral hit "Empathy Cards" teams up with a compassion expert to produce a visually stunning and groundbreaking illustrated guide to help you increase your emotional intelligence and learn how to offer comfort and support when someone you know is in pain. When someone you know is hurting, you want to let her know that you care. But many people don’t know what words to use—or are afraid of saying or doing the wrong thing. This thoughtful, instructive guide, from empathy expert Dr. Kelsey Crowe and greeting card maverick Emily McDowell, blends well-researched, actionable advice with the no-nonsense humor and the signature illustration style of McDowell's immensely popular Empathy Cards, to help you feel confident in connecting with anyone experiencing grief, loss, illness, or any other difficult situation. Written in a how-to, relatable, we’ve-all-been-that-deer-in-the-headlights kind of way, There Is No Good Card for This isn’t a spiritual treatise on how to make you a better person or a scientific argument about why compassion matters. It is a helpful illustrated guide to effective compassion that takes you, step by step by step, past the paralysis of thinking about someone in a difficult time to actually doing something (or nothing) with good judgment instead of fear. There Is No Good Card for This features workbook exercises, sample dialogs, and real-life examples from Dr. Crowe’s research, including her popular "Empathy Bootcamps" that give people tools for building relationships when it really counts. Whether it’s a coworker whose mother has died, a neighbor whose husband has been in a car accident, or a friend who is seriously ill, There Is No Good Card for This teaches you how to be the best friend you can be to someone in need. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Nourishing your body during pancreatic cancer treatment'

Nourishing your body during pancreatic cancer treatment (2016)

Pancreatic Cancer Action

Created by dietitians and chefs at University College Cork, this recipe book provides advice on how best to combat cancer-induced weight loss and other eating related problems whilst undergoing pancreatic cancer treatment.  It features over 80 quick, easy and energy dense recipes for nourishing meals and snacks that have been created specifically for people who find it hard to maintain a healthy weight. 

Cover image of 'Grief and loss when someone dies'

Grief and loss when someone dies (2016)

CHANGE

An easy read booklet explaining what dying is, how you might feel if someone you love dies and where you can get support.  

Cover image of 'Davey’s really magic carpet'

Davey’s really magic carpet (2016)

Blue Canoe Books

A beautifully illustrated children's book which takes the reader, aged 4 upwards, on an adventure with Davey and his Really Magic Carpet. Davey's magic carpet was a gift from his daddy as he died, and each thread is made from a memory they had together. It is an uplifting story about making memories as a family, that is valuable and engaging for any child, but especially those preparing for loss or needing support if bereaved. It is soft back, 21cmx21cm and includes 3 activity pages. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Rising from the ashes of loss: my voyage through grief'

Rising from the ashes of loss: my voyage through grief (2016)

Ayni Books

Death is inevitable and is an existential fear for all human beings. But it is the devastating thought of departing this earth alone and in agony that renders our inevitable transition such a fearful endeavour. For many, it is not so much facing the afterlife, as most religions provide some support in that area, but it is in the way we will end our lives that is the major source of concern. How many of us hope and pray to be blessed with an angel, a loved one that will give us the patient support and attend to our very needs during our last days? Such dedicated souls are few and far apart, and rare are the ones that will undertake that exhausting and onerous task. This book is about one of them though, Pierre, a loving husband who, without hesitation, put his life aside to become the sole caretaker of his wife, Louise, diagnosed with a devastating cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'It's all just rock and roll...: a terrifically truthful tale of one girl's bust up with breast cancer'

It's all just rock and roll...: a terrifically truthful tale of one girl's bust up with breast cancer (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

A truly inspirational story about love, life, happiness and hair. A true story about a girl's victorious battle with breast cancer. She had a choice to make - to crumble or to fight. Her daughter was four, her job was full on and she was spinning a million plates. She was the queen of dodging reality through all the twists and turns of life. This was different - she had to find a way to face her worst fears and to get herself out of the pickle of all pickles. Little did she know that the very same disease that had claimed her parents when she was far too young was to be her most unlikely saviour. She tells the story in real time with humour, a blunt Yorkshire honesty and breath taking courage. What really happens when you're trying to keep your head (and your hair) when the rest of the world is going mad. And what really happens when you finally find your very own sunshine. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Jamie’s journey. Cancer from the voice of a sibling'

Jamie’s journey. Cancer from the voice of a sibling (2016)

Little Five Star

When a child is diagnosed with cancer, his or her siblings may struggle with complex emotions such as confusion, guilt, and fear. Part story, part journal, Jamie's Journey: Cancer from the Voice of a Sibling helps siblings of pediatric cancer patients cope with those intense feelings. The first half of the book is about 13-year-old Jamie who describes the roller coaster of emotions she experiences when her 10-year-old sister, Jordan, is diagnosed with cancer. Jamie laments the loss of her 'normal' teenage life and describes feeling forgotten as her family focuses on Jordan's medical needs. Jamie finds solace through journaling about her experience, and encourages the reader to write about his or her own journey on the pages provided in the book. Jamie's Journey is unique in that it's designed especially for the siblings of pediatric cancer patients. Author Sharon Wozny draws from her experience volunteering with Children's Cancer Network for the past three years. During the time she's spent with young cancer patients and their families, Wozny has discovered that the patients' siblings face unique challenges. "They endure so much," she said. "They feel so much pain on so many levels and need to know that they are heroes also." Wozny has made the second half of the book an interactive journal, offering siblings of pediatric cancer patients a safe place to share their own journey. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The living well with cancer cookbook. An essential guide to nutrition, lifestyle and health'

The living well with cancer cookbook. An essential guide to nutrition, lifestyle and health (2016)

Bantam Press (imprint of Transworld Publications)

When authors Fran Warde and Catherine Zabilowicz met at the Maggie’s centre at Charing Cross Hospital in London, they quickly discovered they shared a passion for good food and healthy eating. They also realized that with their combined knowledge and experience – Fran as an acclaimed food writer, and Catherine as an experienced nutritional therapist working at Maggie’s – they could provide invaluable guidance for anyone living with cancer, their families and friends. The Living Well With Cancer Cookbook, published in support of the Maggie’s charity, is the result of Fran and Catherine’s collaboration. Aimed at helping readers through each stage of their journey – diagnosis, during and after treatment – this essential guide is packed with advice on nutrition and health and offers a range of delicious recipes. There are healthy twists on classic favourites and tempting new treats to try, with every ingredient considered for its health benefits. Positive and empowering, the book contains a wealth of information on the best food choices to make, and reveals why many scientists today believe that certain foods and a balanced diet are crucial in sustaining strength throughout treatment. Taking a holistic approach, this book also seeks to alleviate anxieties, such as those concerning weight-loss, loss of appetite and the changes in how food tastes. Above all, the simple, comforting recipes will help both experienced cooks and novices to create nutritious, easily adapted meals – from breakfast right through to dinner – each one designed to nourish and sustain. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Rise. Surviving and thriving after trauma'

Rise. Surviving and thriving after trauma (2016)

Weidenfeld and Nicholson

Renowned as a much-loved and highly respected journalist and broadcaster with thirty years' experience, Sian Williams has studied the impact of acute stress for many years and is also a trained trauma assessor. In RISE, she explores the science of resilience and growth after trauma, offers advice from the experts, and learns from those who have emerged from horrific experiences, feeling changed yet stronger, with a new perspective on their life, their relationships and their work. She also documents her own path through breast cancer, with candid and unflinching honesty. Her story provides a narrative thread through a book designed to help others deal with all manner of adversity, including physical or mental ill health; loss of a loved one; abuse and post-traumatic stress. RISE is a deeply researched exploration of trauma, grief and illness, and most importantly resilience in the darkest of days. It is an inspiring and powerful piece of work, full of honesty, warmth and wisdom. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Coping with the psychological effects of illness. Strategies to manage anxiety and depression'

Coping with the psychological effects of illness. Strategies to manage anxiety and depression (2015)

Sheldon Press

Sudden, severe ill health comes as a shock and presents several challenges, most notably, loss of confidence. Suddenly people are afraid to take exercise, have sex or even go to the shops. Their entire self-image takes a battering, and this roller-coaster of uncertainty often leads to anxiety and depression. This book looks at the learning curve involved in sudden and chronic illness, and explores key ways to build psychological resilience during this time of challenge. Whether it concerns cancer, heart disease, diabetes, or a mental health condition, it explores the common psychological issues that arise when someone’s usual health and routine are disrupted, and discusses the impact of illness on relationships and family. Drawing on CBT techniques, it offers practical self-help strategies to help deal with peoples changed expectations of themselves, and with the related lifestyle changes. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Gifted by grief. A true story of cancer, loss and rebirth'

Gifted by grief. A true story of cancer, loss and rebirth (2015)

Living Well Publications

Is it really possible to be grateful for your husband’s death? This is the message that ultimately comes over in Jane Duncan Rogers’ book Gifted By Grief: A True Story of Cancer, Loss and Rebirth. Told through the medium of blog posts by her husband in his last year, her own journal entries, and a heartfelt, poignant and riveting narrative, Jane invites the reader into her grief-stricken world. Where this might be harrowing, it is found to be ironic; where there might be pointlessness and despair, gifts are found, inspiring the reader find the gifts in their own life situation. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A sky of diamonds: a story for children about loss, grief and hope'

A sky of diamonds: a story for children about loss, grief and hope (2015)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

When Mia learns that her mother has died, all the colour in her world changes to a dreary grey. She feels guilty, angry, sad and lost (sometimes all at once!), and she doesn't know what to do to feel better. Little by little, with the help of her Dad, Mia learns how to cope with her difficult feelings. Together, they remember her mother by creating memory boxes, and they even get rid of anger by crazily sloshing paints and punching holes in newspapers! In the end, Mia finds her own, very special way of coping. When she feels sad or lonely, she looks up to the stars. Full of practical strategies, this storybook for children aged 5-9 addresses loss, grief and hope. Written from the perspective of Mia who has experienced the sudden death of her mother, it covers the different stages of grief, from initial disbelief, anger and sadness to resolution and hope. The book highlights the importance of giving children the time and space to work through their feelings and provides a host of thoughtful activities to help them cope. It also addresses some of the questions children commonly ask about death. Uniquely illustrated, this book will be an invaluable resource for anyone supporting a grieving child, especially bereavement counsellors, social workers, teachers and other school staff, as well as parents. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'Bald is better with earrings. A survivor’s guide to getting through breast cancer'

Bald is better with earrings. A survivor’s guide to getting through breast cancer (2015)

HarperCollins

When Andrea Hutton was diagnosed with breast cancer, she wanted to know everything. She voraciously read books, articles, and websites and talked to everyone she knew. But nothing prepared her for what the surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation would feel like. Were there tricks that could ease her pain and discomfort? What was “fatigue” and how would it affect her? At what exact moment would her hair fall out and how? Hutton wanted what she could not find: a clear how-to guide for the cancer girl she had become. Bald Is Better with Earrings is Hutton’s answer for women diagnosed with breast cancer: a straightforward handbook, leavened with humor and inspiration, to shepherd them though the experience. Warm and down-to-earth, Hutton explains what to expect and walks you through this intense and emotional process: tests, surgery, chemo, losing your hair and shaving your head, being bald, radiation treatments. Hutton offers a wealth of invaluable advice—from tricks for surviving chemo, to treating your skin during radiation, to keeping track of meds—and includes a practical list of tips for each stage of the process at the end of every chapter. Compassionate, friendly, and shaped by Hutton’s first-hand knowledge, Bald Is Better with Earrings is the comprehensive, essential companion for anyone dealing with breast cancer. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Under cover of darkness. How I blogged my way through mantle cell lymphoma'

Under cover of darkness. How I blogged my way through mantle cell lymphoma (2015)

O-Books (John Hunt Publishing)

Not only is this book an inspiring survival manual for cancer patients, but its humour and objectivity make it a choice read for anyone who enjoys real-life drama and pathos. Diagnosed with Mantle Cell Lymphoma in 2012 the author resorted to a blog to keep in touch with friends, and unwittingly ended up writing about the good, the bad and the ugly side of cancer, which attracted many followers. Is there a good? Very possibly. Bad and ugly, definitely. There is also an extremely funny side - wry observations that brought humour into an otherwise bleak landscape which included chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant. The author is also blessed with a big following from the Mind, Body, Spirit community of which she is a part (including Judy Hall, Anita Moorjani, Dolores Ashcroft-Nowicki); from this outpouring of expert support came advice on nutrition and alternative therapies which help to make this an invaluable source of information for cancer patients and their carers. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Pear shaped'

Pear shaped (2015)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Adam is a 44-year-old London lawyer and father of three. Completely out of the blue, and for no reason other than sheer dumb chance, he was diagnosed with a rare and aggressive brain tumour. Adam has endured radiotherapy and chemotherapy which were preceded by major brain surgery to remove the tumour - helpfully described by his surgeon as being the size and shape of a pear. Using the blackest of humour, this book charts Adam's journey from normality to having a disease regularly described as a “death sentence”. How will he cope with the treatment? How will his relationship with family and friends be affected? Most important of all, how will his hair come through this? Quite simply, it is the funniest book so far this year about brain cancer. Warning - this book is intended for mature audiences due to the subject matter and use of strong language. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'My daddy had cancer'

My daddy had cancer (2015)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

A gentle caring book about a boy, Bertie, whose daddy dies from cancer. This book is for use by a parent, grandparent, teacher or counsellor or anyone who is caring for a child during a difficult time. This book is not intended for a child to read alone, but in a loving nurturing environment to enable the child to share their thoughts and feelings about their loss. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The Royal Marsden cancer cookbook'

The Royal Marsden cancer cookbook (2015)

Kyle Books

The book is divided into three: a detailed section by Clare Shaw about diet and cancer and the problems you may face during treatment (like loss of appetite, nausea, sore mouth, change of taste); recipes to cook during treatment, which are nutritionally beneficial and wholesome enough to keep you strong even if you can’t eat too much; and a section of recipes for after treatment aimed at keeping you healthy. These recipes are designed to serve smaller portions and two people as well as for families, and there are lots of tips about budgeting, leftovers and freezing. Clare and Catherine want to emphasise that you don’t have to cook ‘special’, separate meals for one, the rest of the family can eat in the same way, saving on time and stress as well as encouraging a healthier diet for all. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cancer survivorship coping tools - we'll get you through this'

Cancer survivorship coping tools - we'll get you through this (2015)

Ayni Books

Hearing the words “You have cancer” can be devastating - some cancer patients even say that the emotional pain and loss of certainty from hearing this are worse than the pains from the cancer, surgeries, radiation, chemotherapy, and other treatments. This is the intimate journey of a melanoma and breast cancer survivor who honestly, and sometimes even humorously, shares her own story and offers supportive emotional tools to help people diagnosed with cancer, and their loved ones and caregivers, work through the emotional pain and upheaval of a cancer diagnosis. You will be supported in knowing what it feels like to hear you have cancer and be given a variety of helpful ideas to start feeling better whether you are newly diagnosed, in treatment, or months or years after treatment. If you are a caregiver, friend, or family member who wants to help, you will get a better understanding of the cancer experience as well as tools to help the person you care about. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'My cancer journey. A rendezvous with myself'

My cancer journey. A rendezvous with myself (2015)

Balboa Press

My book is a candid narration of my encounter with breast cancer. It is the story of an ordinary woman who was put in extraordinary circumstances, and who undertook her cancer journey with the utmost courage. This memoir is not just about describing a difficult medical condition. It is about going through the experience, and emerging from it wiser and stronger. It is about using cancer as a life changing experience, despite all the trauma and the loss – and the change needn’t be for the worse. It is about understanding the choice that a human being has – the choice to accept what cannot be changed, and to use one of the toughest fights of life to evolve into a better person, irrespective of the prognosis. Pick up a copy to embark on a rendezvous with your inner self! (Author)

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