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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 113

Cover image of 'Menopausal symptoms and breast cancer'

Menopausal symptoms and breast cancer (March 2018)

Breast Cancer Care

A booklet for women who are experiencing menopausal symptoms after breast cancer treatment. It has advice on treatments (prescription drugs and complementary therapies) and practical measures for coping with hot flushes, vaginal dryness, loss of libido, mood swings, joint pain and risk of osteoporosis. Includes details of further support.

Cover image of 'Milkshakes and morphine. A memoir of love and loss'

Milkshakes and morphine. A memoir of love and loss (2018)

Square Peg (Vintage)

This is a singular memoir: an excavation of mother love, a candid account of the agonies, and absurdities, of the cancer experience, and a doggedly optimistic paean to life. When Genevieve Fox finds a lump in her throat, she turns up for the hospital diagnosis in a party frock and fancy hair. I can’t have cancer, she thinks. I’ve done my hair. But there is another reason she can’t countenance cancer. Genevieve was orphaned to it at the age of nine. Genevieve’s story weaves together past and present as she recalls her rackety, unconventional childhood, while also facing the spectre of being lost to her young boys. Yet, she confronts her treatment with the same sassy survival instinct that characterised her childhood misadventures. Through an extraordinary alchemy, Genevieve takes life’s precariousness and turns it on its head. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Side effects of cancer treatment'

Side effects of cancer treatment (January 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This factsheet is about some of the side effects of cancer treatment.

Cover image of 'Chemotherapy. Your questions answered'

Chemotherapy. Your questions answered (November 2017)

The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust

This booklet describes what chemotherapy is, how it works, how treatment is planned and carried out, and possible side-effects; for example, anaemia, infection, appetite changes, nausea, skin changes, hair loss, and fertility problems. It also briefly discusses issues such as emotional well-being and fatigue. Includes further sources of information and support.

Cover image of 'Side effects of cancer treatment'

Side effects of cancer treatment (March 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

An overview of some of the more common side-effects that might happen with cancer treatments: bone marrow and blood, fatigue, mouth problems, nausea and vomiting, diarrhoea and constipation, eating problems, skin, fertility, sex life, hormonal changes. The booklet suggests ways of dealing with them.

Cover image of 'Having a bad hair day'

Having a bad hair day (2017)

Clare C Davison

“Tomorrow, you will feel a little bit better.” From a loving childhood, belonging to a large family with no history of breast cancer, Clare was alarmed at age 42 to accidentally discover she had the disease. As a self-employed single mum, Clare documents her memoirs of personal experience and knowledge of the cruel decisions made for the aggressive treatments and hair loss ahead. With an inner strength of humour, Clare’s first book includes her lunch arrangements with Peter Andre, a cake nationally released in her honour, an experience of public speaking, media attention and continued fundraising with a moving excerpt from her son. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Pretty sick. The beauty guide for woman with cancer. How to look your best when you feel your worst'

Pretty sick. The beauty guide for woman with cancer. How to look your best when you feel your worst (2017)

Piatkus (Little, Brown Book Group)

The ultimate resource to looking your best during and after cancer treatment, from a veteran beauty industry insider. Like many women who receive the shattering diagnosis of cancer, Caitlin Kiernan was concerned about her health and her future, but also about how the treatment would affect how she felt and looked - would she lose her hair? Would she lose her nails? How would she look after a double mastectomy? But unlike other women who battle cancer, Kiernan has spent her entire career as a beauty editor, beauty director (most recently for Life & Style Weekly), and now beauty producer. As someone who works in the public eye and in the fashion industry, Kiernan had to quickly learn how to look her best even when she was feeling her worst. So she called on her list of extensive contacts and beauty insiders - from hair professionals to top medical doctors (at institutions like Memorial Sloan Kettering and Mt Sinai Hospital) to style mavens and even celebrities (including Wendy Williams and Hoda Kotb) - to gather the best and most useful beauty tips for cancer treatment. The result is Pretty Sick: the ultimate guide to beauty during (and after) cancer treatment, covering skin care, hair care (and wig shopping), nail care, makeup, an explanation of breast cancer surgical options, style advice for life post mastectomy, and much, much more. Illustrated with charming line drawings and peppered with advice from celebrities and cancer survivors, Pretty Sick will be a welcome and trusted resource during treatment, helping women to look their best even when they don't feel their best. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'All to live for. Fighting cancer. Finding hope.'

All to live for. Fighting cancer. Finding hope. (2017)

Headline

In 2005 Emma Hannigan was 32, happily married to her long-time love, with two young children. Her world was shattered when she discovered that she had the rare gene BRCA1, meaning a 50% chance of developing ovarian cancer and an 85% chance of breast cancer. To reduce the risk, Emma had a double mastectomy and both ovaries removed, but in 2007 received the news that cancer had struck anyway. Twelve years later, Emma is battling cancer for the tenth time. With warmth and wisdom, she shares her journey and her advice on everything from skincare and hair loss to how to keep a sense of humour through it all. All to Live For is a story of one woman's determination not to let cancer win; a story of strength and inspiration, hope and love. And of never giving up. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Chemo summer. An uplifting breast cancer experience'

Chemo summer. An uplifting breast cancer experience (2017)

Austin Macauley

In Chemo Summer Jane Hoggar takes the reader through a light-hearted and informative account of her discovery of breast cancer and its cure. Cancer of any description has the capacity to chill those it affects and their loved ones. But for Jane Hoggar early discovery and diagnosis provided for a satisfactory resolution. And it's these small details that might well help people in a similar situation. For example, Jane did not discover a lump, which is the usual thing in breast cancer, but a sag' when she raised her arms and it was her insistence that something was wrong that resulted in a vital early medical diagnosis. All the side issues are covered in the book, effects of chemo and radiotherapy, hair loss and wigs, changes in diet and exercise, making Chemo Summer a valuable and engaging look into a serious and often frightening subject. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Living for a reason - a true cancer journey'

Living for a reason - a true cancer journey (2016)

Austin Macauley

There can be up to 50,000 cases of breast cancer a year in the UK. Ann, in J.A. Prescott's Living for a Reason, is just one. On receiving the news of her condition Ann greets it with the response - You haven't told me that I'm dying yet?' and that is the spirit she carries throughout the book. It is a moving and powerful portrait of a woman who, faced with the vicissitudes of cancer, determines to live life to the full. The book shows Ann as she goes through the stages of cancer and the phases of treatment; the well known mastectomy, the loss of hair, the cosmetic surgery, the chemotherapy and the less well-known side-effects of the drugs. With her condition compounded with the onset of arthritis Ann's determination is inspirational and her story is one of great courage. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Tea & chemo. Fighting cancer, living life'

Tea & chemo. Fighting cancer, living life (2015)

Urbane Publications Limited

At the age of 45, wife and mother Jackie Buxton was diagnosed with breast cancer. Lurching between the crippling fear that the cancer had spread, and the great comfort of knowing she was one of the lucky ones who could be treated, she did what she always does when life presents her with a challenge: she wrote it down. Jackie quickly realised that even with cancer, life was far from bad. Never known for her scientific prowess, she nonetheless became a 'bit of an expert' - at least in the field of hair loss, water retention and biscuits - and decided to use her writing to share experiences and help others recognise you don't have to be defined by your cancer. Tea & Chemo is full of laughter, tears, honesty and hope, and offers inspirational words to everyone facing the life challenges that cancer inevitably brings. All proceeds from the sales of Tea & Chemo will go to three incredibly important charities, whose compassionate care and professionalism make the difference to so many lives: The Haven, Breast Cancer Now and The Robert Ogden Macmillan Centre, Harrogate. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Nowhere hair'

Nowhere hair (2015)

Thousand Words Press

The little girl in Nowhere Hair knows two things: Her mom's hair is not on her head anymore, so therefore it must be somewhere around the house. After searching the obvious places, the story reveals that her mother, although going through cancer treatment, is still silly, attentive, happy and yes, sometimes very tired and cranky. She learns that she didn't cause the cancer, can't catch it, and that Mommy still is very much up for the job of mothering. The book, written in rhyme, explains hats, scarves, wigs, going bald in public, and the idea of being nice to people who may look a little different than you. It ends with the idea that what is inside of us is far more important than how we look on the outside. For any parent or grandparent, Nowhere Hair offers a comfortable platform to explain something that is inherently very difficult. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Look good...feel better confidence kit. A guide to managing the appearance-related effects of cancer treatment'

Look good...feel better confidence kit. A guide to managing the appearance-related effects of cancer treatment (2015)

Look Good...Feel Better

This booklet and accompanying DVD has information and advice about make-up, skincare, hand and nail care, wig selection and cutting, scarf tying and head coverings to help manage changes in personal appearance caused by treatment for cancer.

Cover image of 'Diet and breast cancer'

Diet and breast cancer (January 2020)

Breast Cancer Now

A booklet for people having treatment for, or recovering from, breast cancer. It explains what is meant by a healthy diet and what to do if the effects of treatment cause problems such as changes in appetite or taste, nausea, sore mouth, constipation or diarrhoea. It also covers weight gain, weight loss, bone health, dietary supplements, phyto-oestrogens, alcohol, and complementary and alternative diets such as the Bristol diet, dairy-free diets and macrobiotics.

Cover image of 'Young person's guide to lymphoma'

Young person's guide to lymphoma (January 2020)

Lymphoma Action

Comprehensive booklet for young people with lymphoma. 

Cover image of 'The building-up diet'

The building-up diet (August 2020)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is for people who may be finding it difficult to maintain their weight during and after cancer treatment. It explains the different food types and has suggestions on how to get more energy and protein in your diet. It also  includes some meal ideas and some shopping list suggestions. These may help you when preparing meals. 

Cover image of 'Dear life. A doctor's story of love and loss'

Dear life. A doctor's story of love and loss (2020)

Little, Brown Book Group

As a specialist in palliative medicine, Dr Rachel Clarke chooses to inhabit a place many people would find too tragic to contemplate. Every day she tries to bring care and comfort to those reaching the end of their lives and to help make dying more bearable. Rachel's training was put to the test in 2017 when her beloved GP father was diagnosed with terminal cancer. She learned that nothing - even the best palliative care - can sugar-coat the pain of losing someone you love. And yet, she argues, in a hospice there is more of what matters in life - more love, more strength, more kindness, more joy, more tenderness, more grace, more compassion - than you could ever imagine. For if there is a difference between people who know they are dying and the rest of us, it is simply this: that the terminally ill know their time is running out, while we live as though we have all the time in the world. Dear Life is a book about the vital importance of human connection, by the doctor we would all want by our sides at a time of crisis. It is a love letter - to a father, to a profession, to life itself. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Eating problems and cancer'

Eating problems and cancer (August 2020)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Many people have eating problems during and after cancer treatment. This can be related to the cancer or to the side effects of cancer treatments. This booklet talks about some common eating problems and why they might happen. It also suggests some practical ways to manage them. There is also information for carers, family members and friends. 

Cover image of 'Eating – help yourself. A guide for patients and their carers'

Eating – help yourself. A guide for patients and their carers (February 2019)

Christie Hospital NHS Trust

Eating may be a problem for people with cancer or other illnesses, particularly when undergoing treatment such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy. This booklet has advice on how to eat well when trying to cope with loss of appetite, changes in taste, dry mouth, difficulties swallowing, feeling full, nausea, diarrhoea, and constipation. It has tips on how to make food as nourishing as possible and ideas for snacks and drinks.

Cover image of 'Bereavement and grief'

Bereavement and grief (November 2019)

Lymphoma Action

The death of someone you love can be extremely difficult to deal with and the mix of feelings that accompany such loss can feel overwhelming. Even if the person was unwell for a while, it can still be a shock. We all have our own ways of grieving. While nobody can take away the pain, there is support available to help you cope. Contents: What is grief?; Feelings you might experience when someone you love dies; Interactions with other people; Frequently asked questions about bereavement, loss and grief; How can I help myself?.

Cover image of 'Your body, intimacy and sex'

Your body, intimacy and sex (November 2019)

Breast Cancer Now

Breast cancer and its treatments can cause many physical and emotional changes. This booklet outlines how these changes can alter the way you feel about your body, and how they may affect sex and intimacy. The booklet covers many topics including getting used to changes to your body, how breast cancer and its treatments may affect your sex life or intimate relationships, and offers tips on sex and intimacy after treatment. 

Cover image of 'A young person's guide to dealing with the loss of a brother or sister'

A young person's guide to dealing with the loss of a brother or sister (November 2019)

CLIC Sargent

The death of a brother or sister is likely to be one of the most difficult things that’s ever happened to you. It may even feel like nobody understands what you’re going through, but the fact is help is always at hand. CLIC Sargent has worked closely with young people who have lost a sibling to put together this booklet. As well as showing how this is something others have experienced, we’ve provided contacts to help you find further support and information. Even if you just want someone to talk to, you’ll find all the information you need right here.

Cover image of 'Eating well when you have cancer'

Eating well when you have cancer (February 2019)

The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust

Cancer and its treatment can affect appetite and enjoyment of food. This booklet has been written to help people eat well when they have a poor appetite or are losing weight. It suggests foods to eat to maintain a healthy diet, foods to avoid, nourishing and supplementary drinks, and high-energy foods. It also has advice for times when eating is difficult, as a result, for example, of fatigue, nausea, sore mouth, diarrhoea, or constipation. Includes recipes and sources of further information and support.

Cover image of 'Diet and nutrition'

Diet and nutrition (December 2019)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This leaflet is for anyone receiving treatment or who has recently completed their treatment.There’s no specific food or type of diet that can control or treat brain tumours, but controlling your diet may help to improve your quality of life and manage the side-effects of treatment, such as dry mouth, nausea, poor appetite, and weight loss.

Cover image of 'Beyond'

Beyond (2019)

Burning Chair

What happens when we die? Is this really all there is? What exists beyond this life? Alex Duncan is just an ordinary 14 year old boy. His main worries are homework, girls, the school bully......and his sister, Jenna who has ovarian cancer, stage B. As his parents retreat into themselves, Alex is desperate to find a way to help, a way to make things better for his sister. After all, it’s the not knowing that’s the worst thing. Whilst he tries to untangle the ultimate question, life still goes on: his best friend seems oblivious to his feelings about her, the school bully has taken a special interest in him, and everything he does just makes him feel more and more awkward and out of place. Georgia Springate’s debut novel, Beyond, is a funny and touchingly compelling coming-of-age story about love, loss and discovery. Read it and take an emotional journey through one boy’s quest to understand that most tricky of questions: what lies beyond? (Publishers)

Cover image of 'Mum's jumper'

Mum's jumper (2019)

AVA Publishing SA

If Mum has gone, how do you carry on? Missing her feels like a dark cloud that follows you around, or like swimming to a shore that never comes any nearer. But memories are like a jumper that you can cuddle and wear. And Mum's jumper might be a way to keep her close. A simple, heartfelt and ultimately uplifting book for anyone coping with loss. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer roller coaster. How to manage the emotional and mental impact'

The cancer roller coaster. How to manage the emotional and mental impact (2019)

Librotas

Two days after celebrating her 50th birthday, Juliette Chan had an unexpected birthday present: bowel cancer. Luckily, they caught it early, but once the treatment was over, the psychological side-effects surfaced. For many months, Juliette was adrift and felt lost. It seemed that everything in her life was up for review and she struggled to gain clarity about what to do next. There were many questions, such as: When will I feel normal again; Why am I not as motivated as before; Will the cancer come back; Why am I mentally exhausted. It took her a while to realise that the cancer had caused a whole load of losses: loss of trust in her body, self-image as a fit and healthy person, energy, confidence, motivation, income and much more. And that’s when the penny dropped; she was grieving. Cancer not only involves coping with the physical disease and treatment – it also means experiencing and dealing with hidden losses that will affect how you view and live your life. Every time you experience a loss, there is an emotional response: grief. Most people only associate grief with bereavement but it is in fact a natural reaction to any and all losses, including the hidden and intangible losses you face with cancer. Anyone who has or has had cancer, as well as their family and friends, will experience grief – because life has changed. This can show up as anger, frustration, anxiety, ‘depression’, fear, sadness, for example. If left unchecked or suppressed, grief will affect your mental health and emotional wellbeing. It doesn’t have to be like this; it is possible to take care of the emotional and mental impact of cancer and to live well. In her easy, relaxed style of writing, Juliette explains the emotional and mental impact of cancer and highlights the limitations of Mindfulness and positive thinking. She has also included a workbook with simple practical exercises that help to release the psychological side-effects and provide clarity. You can also read the candid stories of eight others who faced cancer: Robert describes his initial feelings of shock on diagnosis and how others helped him to cope, whereas Meena recounts going it alone; Petra shares how she continued to run throughout her treatment, and Susan talks movingly about the seemingly endless decision-making from diagnosis onwards; Mary, Tony and June recount their unique experiences of the same cancer

Cover image of '365 days past the traffic lights'

365 days past the traffic lights (2019)

Independently published

How do you cope with the death of a parent at 24 years old? The time when you’re somewhere between independence and reliance on parents, figuring out who you are and what you want to do, and trying to maintain friendships and a social life when your world is crumbling around you and no one understands. Rose Taylor straddled two worlds; living in both a picturesque English village and an adventure filled Hollywood lifestyle in Los Angeles. But in late 2017 life hurtled her into a new realm, one that was immersed in medical settings and put her life on hold. In this compelling and emotive memoir, Rose Taylor explores the first 365 days following the death of her father. She writes frankly about the moment of diagnosis, the experience of becoming a carer for a parent and sheds light on the psychological and physical symptoms of bereavement. The book takes the reader between London, Atlanta and Los Angeles weaving together the experience of grieving and a narrative of reconciling memory and loss. The book ultimately offers a voice for grieving young adults, with the aim of showing them they are not alone. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Managing lung cancer symptoms'

Managing lung cancer symptoms (August 2018)

Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation

If you or someone you care for has just been diagnosed with lung cancer you may have lots of questions. This booklet was produced with input from people affected by lung cancer and lung cancer experts, and is designed to help answer those questions.It describes the possible symptoms that may experienced when living with lung cancer and how to cope with them.

Cover image of 'Honest answers, sound advice: a young person's guide to cancer'

Honest answers, sound advice: a young person's guide to cancer (2018)

Teenage Cancer Trust

Comprehensive information for young people with cancer.

Cover image of 'Eat well during cancer. Helping you cope with common side-effects of cancer and cancer treatment'

Eat well during cancer. Helping you cope with common side-effects of cancer and cancer treatment (2018)

World Cancer Research Fund

This booklet is for people living with cancer and those having cancer treatment, who want to know more about how to cope with the common side-effects, but also want to follow as healthy a diet and lifestyle as possible. It is a general guide and not suitable for people who are eating very little, have lost a lot of weight unintentionally or are receiving palliative care, as they will need specialist information and advice. 

Cover image of 'Coping with common symptoms of lymphoma'

Coping with common symptoms of lymphoma (November 2018)

Lymphoma Action

This factsheet has general guidance for coping with some of the symptoms of lymphoma, including: swollen lymph nodes; fatigue;  weight loss; night sweats; itching; pain; skin symptoms; swollen arms or legs; and coping with your emotions.

Cover image of 'Symptoms of lymphoma'

Symptoms of lymphoma (November 2018)

Lymphoma Action

This information gives details about the symptoms of lymphoma and the possible reasons for them: B symptoms; swollen lymph nodes; fatigue; unexplained weight loss; night sweats; itching; fever; difficulty getting over infections; chest symptoms; abdominal (tummy) symptoms; pain; skin symptoms; brain and nerve symptoms; swelling in the arms or legs; anaemia (low red blood cells). 

Cover image of 'Zoledronic acid [Lithuanian]'

Zoledronic acid [Lithuanian] (December 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Information from the Macmillan Cancer Support website translated into Lithuanian. Zoledronic acid is a bisphosphonate that can be used to help prevent bone loss, reduce the risk of cancer spreading to the bones in women with early breast cancer, treat bone weakness or pain caused by myeloma or cancer that has spread to the bones (secondary bone cancer), or treat high levels of calcium in the blood. This factsheet describes how it is given and the possible side-effects.

Cover image of 'Preparing a child for loss'

Preparing a child for loss (April 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support|Winston's Wish

This booklet is written with the childhood bereavement charity, Winston’s Wish. It’s for parents or guardians who are near the end of life and aims to help you prepare and talk to a child or children about your death. Partners, grandparents and close family members may find it useful, too. It may also help you talk to children who are already dealing with the death of a family member. 

Cover image of 'In our own words. Parents talk about life after their child has died of cancer'

In our own words. Parents talk about life after their child has died of cancer (January 2018)

CLIC Sargent

This booklet has been written for families whose children have cancer. It includes sections on the circles of grief, changes in grief over time, how relationships are affected, the dual process model of coping with grief, remembering your child, spirituality, and dealing with other people's responses. The text is interspersed with quotes from people whose child has died.

Cover image of 'Vision loss and brain tumours. What you need to know'

Vision loss and brain tumours. What you need to know (July 2018)

The Brain Tumour Charity

This booklet summarises some of the key types of vision problems that may occur as a result of brain tumours or their treatment, and how to adapt to them. 

Cover image of 'A moment of grace. A story of love and loss'

A moment of grace. A story of love and loss (2018)

Ebury Press (Penguin Random House)

Patrick Dillon and Nicola Thorold were together for twenty-eight years. Patrick was an award-winning architect and writer and Nicola a leading figure in theatre, awarded an OBE for her contribution to the arts at London’s Roundhouse. Their two children were almost grown-up. Life was good. And then, in May 2015, Nicola was diagnosed with leukaemia. After several rounds of treatment, a bone marrow transplant and many waves of recovery and decline, she died thirteen months after her diagnosis. Six months later, at Christmas, Patrick started to write. A Moment of Grace is the searing, tender account of Patrick’s life with Nicola and her illness, and his life after her loss. But it is more than a story of illness and unbearable grief: it is a book of memory, of home, of family. It is a tale of the transfiguring power of love. Heartbreaking, life-affirming and truly unforgettable, A Moment of Grace is one man’s journey to find life after his wife’s death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Spoiler alert: the hero dies. A memoir of love, loss and other four-letter words'

Spoiler alert: the hero dies. A memoir of love, loss and other four-letter words (2018)

Atria Books (Simon and Schuster)

In this evocative and gorgeously wrought memoir reminiscent of Rob Sheffield’s Love Is a Mixtape and George Hodgman’s Bettyville, Michael Ausiello—a respected TV columnist and founder and editor-in-chief of TVLine.com—remembers his late husband, and the lessons, love, and laughter that they shared throughout their fourteen years together. For the past decade, TV fans of all stripes have counted upon Michael Ausiello’s insider knowledge to get the scoop on their favorite shows and stars. From his time at Soaps in Depth to his influential stints at TV Guide and Entertainment Weekly to his current role as founder and editor-in-chief of the wildly popular website TVLine.com, Michael has established himself as the go-to expert when it comes to our most popular form of entertainment. What many of his fans don’t know, however, is that while his professional life was in full swing, Michael had to endure the greatest of personal tragedies: his husband, Kit Cowan, was diagnosed with a rare and very aggressive form of neuroendocrine cancer. Over the course of eleven months, Kit and Michael did their best to combat the deadly disease, but Kit succumbed to his illness in February 2015. In this heartbreaking and darkly hilarious memoir, Michael tells the story of his harrowing and challenging last year with Kit while revisiting the thirteen years that preceded it, and how the undeniably powerful bond between him and Kit carried them through all manner of difficulty—always with laughter front and center in their relationship. Instead of a tale of sadness and loss, Spoiler Alert: The Hero Dies is an unforgettable, inspiring, and beautiful testament to the resilience and strength of true love. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The pond'

The pond (2018)

Graffeg Limited

The Pond is a touching picture book about a young boy, and his family, overcoming the loss of his father. This colourful, emotional book is filled with natural imagery, and will teach children not only about death and loss, but the importance of the natural world. From Nicola Davies and Cathy Fisher, the duo behind the beautiful children’s book Perfect. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'All the time we thought we had'

All the time we thought we had (2018)

Polygon (Birlinn Imprint)

How do you start a new life when the person you love is about to die? At the age of thirty-six, Gordon Darroch's wife was diagnosed with breast cancer. It was a devastating blow just as he, and their two children with autism, were preparing to move to her native Holland. Eighteen months later, as their plans seemed to be back on course, came the second blow: Magteld was terminally ill and possibly had only a few months to live. As her health rapidly deteriorated, they became caught up in a race against time to get a dying mother home and give their children a future in a country they hardly knew. How could they build a new life in the midst of grief and loss? How would their two sons adjust to such enormous changes? And what would remain of Magteld once she was gone? All the Time We Thought We Had is a story of love and loss and a meditation on grief and memory. It's about how events shape our lives and how we cope with them. And it raises important questions about what we value in life and the legacies we leave behind. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A new kind of normal'

A new kind of normal (2018)

Self-published

They say there’s a book in all of us, but I doubt I would ever have written one had it not have been for my diagnosis of breast cancer in 2011. ‘A New Kind of Normal' is the story of my life up to and moving on from that moment. Growing up in the 60's, working through the 70's and 80's, juggling a career in TV and radio while bringing up three children and surviving two divorces. From the moment I knew what a bra was, I’d wanted breasts: I even crafted a pair of blue plasticine boobs for myself, as nature made me wait until I was 15 for breasts of my own! Through cancer I lost them both, and with the chemotherapy; all my hair, my fingernails, and more worryingly, a sense of whom I was. My hair grew back, as did my fingernails, but I still struggled with my identity. What I’ve written isn't a diary, nor a self-help guide, and it's not just about cancer. I’ve taken a really good look at the little girl I was and the woman I grew into, and why I went to such lengths to try and claw back some of what cancer had taken from me - it's not everyone's way I appreciate, and it’s been an interesting exercise trying to ascertain why it was mine! I’ve been honest, open, and meticulous when it comes to detail, as I firmly believe that if you take away the mystery, you can take away some of the fear. But there’s a lot to laugh about here too, as luckily I’ve always been able to see the funny side of a situation, preferring that to the occasional overwhelming despair I felt. In this book I've tried to move the disease away from the medical professionals and the hospitals, and to bring it into the day to day, because that's where it sits. Over the last seven years I’ve come to realise that the ripple effect of cancer is far reaching, affecting not just those of us living with it but everyone around us. 'A New Kind of Normal' gives an insight into my relationship with my then partner, now husband; my children and their reaction to my illness, my family and friends, my work colleagues, people who wrote to me, and the professionals who cared for me; everybody reacts differently. Breast cancer assaults your femininity - the treatment is tough and the surgery brutal.  It isn't easy, but it is possible, and I'd like to feel this book may be a source of comfort to anyone who's life is touched by breast cancer; maybe even help them to find their 'New Kind of Normal'. There are many things in life we may have to give up on, but hope is not one of them. (P

Cover image of 'Love and remission: my life, my man, my cancer'

Love and remission: my life, my man, my cancer (2018)

Trigger

In her mid-twenties, balancing a stable job and a partying lifestyle, Annie was also on the hunt for a man. She wanted to find Mr Right, get married, buy a house, and live the life she'd always wanted. But then one day, she found a lump ... Breast cancer. The two words that would derail Annie's life. Suddenly she realised how short her life had been, and the very idea of finding love seemed impossible. As her hair fell out, and her social life crumbled, her mental health deteriorated. She began to question if she would actually survive. Struggling with an identity crisis and worryingly low moods, she wondered if she'd ever be able to live the normal life that had been within her reach only months earlier. Love and Remission tells the tale of a young woman in search of love and mental wellbeing. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'My daddy is my superhero'

My daddy is my superhero (2018)

North Staffordshire Press

My Daddy Is My Superhero was inspired by Michaelagh's own experience of explaining her husband's brain tumour illness to her eldest son, and is intended to help begin conversations surrounding serious illness and death with young children. At its core, My Daddy Is My Superhero is about the loving relationship between a little boy and his dad. It is a story about love, fun, beauty, loss, sadness, memories and celebration. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The magical wood'

The magical wood (2018)

Lemon Drop Books

This is a story about loss, friendship and hope. The Magical Wood is set in a beautiful wood with a river wandering through. One cold and stormy day, the wind blew a terrible gale. The next day the tree family woke to find that Strongest Tree had fallen to the woodland floor and had sadly died. How would the tree family survive the seasons without the strength of Strongest Tree? Throughout each season the tree family are visited by a new animal, offering advice and support to the trees. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Goodbye Daisy'

Goodbye Daisy (2018)

Hashtag Press

Elsie and Daisy are best friends. They go to a special school, a school where the children have helpers and some of the children use wheels to get around. Elsie waits at the classroom door for her best friend to arrive every day. One day Daisy doesn’t arrive in school. All the grown-ups are crying; they are sad because Daisy has died. Elsie will never see her friend again. Elsie isn’t sad though, she is cross with her friend for not saying goodbye. Goodbye Daisy is based on Stephanie Nimmo’s own experiences of explaining to her daughter Daisy’s friends that Daisy had died. Aimed mainly at children with profound learning disabilities it is also a heart-warming social story and support guide about the death of a school friend that will support help parents, carers and professionals support a child through their loss and grief. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Gone in the morning. A writer’s journey of bereavement'

Gone in the morning. A writer’s journey of bereavement (2018)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

An exploration of death, bereavement and grief. This first hand account gives Geoff Mead's experience of responding to the loss of his wife from a brain tumour. Giving insight into the grieving process and how Geoff learned to manage his grief, this book will offer hope to anyone experiencing something similar. After coming to the realisation that mourning is a conscious process, to which we can apply creativity, passion and intelligence, Geoff explored the unknown territory of bereavement through his writing. The book shows how artful practice, such as writing, can help to make sense of our experience and navigate the wreckage of grief. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'Only one of me. A love letter from mum'

Only one of me. A love letter from mum (2018)

Graffeg Limited

'There's only one mum quite like me. I wish that there were two. I'd have more time to spend And I would spend it all with you.' Most of us can't imagine having the time we spend with our children or loved ones cut short, but this is the reality being faced by mother of two Lisa Wells, who was diagnosed with terminal bowel and liver cancer in December 2017 at the age of 31. The Only One of Me project grew from Lisa's determination to leave a lasting legacy for her daughters and her desire to help other families rally against the difficulties of loss. Only One of Me is the product of Lisa's lifelong love of writing and a newfound friendship with award-winning children's author Michelle Robinson. The two collaborated on this tender and moving rhyming poem, with charming illustrations by Catalina Echeverri, which is both a love letter to Lisa's own daughters and a testament to the unwavering strength of parental love, a timeless message for families facing the challenges of bereavement. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Only one of me. A love letter from dad'

Only one of me. A love letter from dad (2018)

Graffeg Limited

There's only one dad quite like me. I wish that there were two. I'd have more time to spend And I would spend it all with you. Most of us can't imagine having the time we spend with our children or loved ones cut short, but this is the reality being faced by mother of two Lisa Wells, who was diagnosed with terminal bowel and liver cancer in December 2017, at the age of 31. The Only One of Me project grew from Lisa's determination to leave a lasting legacy for her daughters and her desire to help other families rally against the difficulties of loss. Only One of Me is the product of Lisa's lifelong love of writing and a newfound friendship with award-winning children's author Michelle Robinson. The two collaborated on this tender and moving rhyming poem, with charming illustrations by Tim Budgen, which is both a love letter to Lisa's own daughters and a testament to the unwavering strength of parental love, a timeless message for families facing the challenges of bereavement. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Healthy eating guidelines. A guide to supporting health with good nutrition for people affected by cancer.'

Healthy eating guidelines. A guide to supporting health with good nutrition for people affected by cancer. (January 2017)

Penny Brohn UK

This booklet has been written for people affected by cancer or those wishing to reduce their risk of cancer. It contains general guidance and is not meant to be prescriptive. Everyone has unique nutritional requirements that depend, amongst other things, on genetic make up, medical history, stage of treatment, current state of health, and lifestyle, as well as tastes and preferences. The guidelines can be adapted to suit your own tastes and needs. If you have special dietary needs or problems with eating, swallowing, digestion, or weight loss you should seek further advice from a nutritionally-qualified health professional who has experience of working with people affected by cancer. 

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