Publications directory

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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 113

Cover image of 'Tea & chemo. Fighting cancer, living life'

Tea & chemo. Fighting cancer, living life (2015)

Urbane Publications Limited

At the age of 45, wife and mother Jackie Buxton was diagnosed with breast cancer. Lurching between the crippling fear that the cancer had spread, and the great comfort of knowing she was one of the lucky ones who could be treated, she did what she always does when life presents her with a challenge: she wrote it down. Jackie quickly realised that even with cancer, life was far from bad. Never known for her scientific prowess, she nonetheless became a 'bit of an expert' - at least in the field of hair loss, water retention and biscuits - and decided to use her writing to share experiences and help others recognise you don't have to be defined by your cancer. Tea & Chemo is full of laughter, tears, honesty and hope, and offers inspirational words to everyone facing the life challenges that cancer inevitably brings. All proceeds from the sales of Tea & Chemo will go to three incredibly important charities, whose compassionate care and professionalism make the difference to so many lives: The Haven, Breast Cancer Now and The Robert Ogden Macmillan Centre, Harrogate. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Nowhere hair'

Nowhere hair (2015)

Thousand Words Press

The little girl in Nowhere Hair knows two things: Her mom's hair is not on her head anymore, so therefore it must be somewhere around the house. After searching the obvious places, the story reveals that her mother, although going through cancer treatment, is still silly, attentive, happy and yes, sometimes very tired and cranky. She learns that she didn't cause the cancer, can't catch it, and that Mommy still is very much up for the job of mothering. The book, written in rhyme, explains hats, scarves, wigs, going bald in public, and the idea of being nice to people who may look a little different than you. It ends with the idea that what is inside of us is far more important than how we look on the outside. For any parent or grandparent, Nowhere Hair offers a comfortable platform to explain something that is inherently very difficult. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Look good...feel better confidence kit. A guide to managing the appearance-related effects of cancer treatment'

Look good...feel better confidence kit. A guide to managing the appearance-related effects of cancer treatment (2015)

Look Good...Feel Better

This booklet and accompanying DVD has information and advice about make-up, skincare, hand and nail care, wig selection and cutting, scarf tying and head coverings to help manage changes in personal appearance caused by treatment for cancer.

Cover image of 'Diet and breast cancer'

Diet and breast cancer (January 2020)

Breast Cancer Now

A booklet for people having treatment for, or recovering from, breast cancer. It explains what is meant by a healthy diet and what to do if the effects of treatment cause problems such as changes in appetite or taste, nausea, sore mouth, constipation or diarrhoea. It also covers weight gain, weight loss, bone health, dietary supplements, phyto-oestrogens, alcohol, and complementary and alternative diets such as the Bristol diet, dairy-free diets and macrobiotics.

Cover image of 'Young person's guide to lymphoma'

Young person's guide to lymphoma (January 2020)

Lymphoma Action

Comprehensive booklet for young people with lymphoma. 

Cover image of 'The building-up diet'

The building-up diet (August 2020)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is for people who may be finding it difficult to maintain their weight during and after cancer treatment. It explains the different food types and has suggestions on how to get more energy and protein in your diet. It also  includes some meal ideas and some shopping list suggestions. These may help you when preparing meals. 

Cover image of 'Dear life. A doctor's story of love and loss'

Dear life. A doctor's story of love and loss (2020)

Little, Brown Book Group

As a specialist in palliative medicine, Dr Rachel Clarke chooses to inhabit a place many people would find too tragic to contemplate. Every day she tries to bring care and comfort to those reaching the end of their lives and to help make dying more bearable. Rachel's training was put to the test in 2017 when her beloved GP father was diagnosed with terminal cancer. She learned that nothing - even the best palliative care - can sugar-coat the pain of losing someone you love. And yet, she argues, in a hospice there is more of what matters in life - more love, more strength, more kindness, more joy, more tenderness, more grace, more compassion - than you could ever imagine. For if there is a difference between people who know they are dying and the rest of us, it is simply this: that the terminally ill know their time is running out, while we live as though we have all the time in the world. Dear Life is a book about the vital importance of human connection, by the doctor we would all want by our sides at a time of crisis. It is a love letter - to a father, to a profession, to life itself. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Eating problems and cancer'

Eating problems and cancer (August 2020)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Many people have eating problems during and after cancer treatment. This can be related to the cancer or to the side effects of cancer treatments. This booklet talks about some common eating problems and why they might happen. It also suggests some practical ways to manage them. There is also information for carers, family members and friends. 

Cover image of 'Eating – help yourself. A guide for patients and their carers'

Eating – help yourself. A guide for patients and their carers (February 2019)

Christie Hospital NHS Trust

Eating may be a problem for people with cancer or other illnesses, particularly when undergoing treatment such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy. This booklet has advice on how to eat well when trying to cope with loss of appetite, changes in taste, dry mouth, difficulties swallowing, feeling full, nausea, diarrhoea, and constipation. It has tips on how to make food as nourishing as possible and ideas for snacks and drinks.

Cover image of 'Bereavement and grief'

Bereavement and grief (November 2019)

Lymphoma Action

The death of someone you love can be extremely difficult to deal with and the mix of feelings that accompany such loss can feel overwhelming. Even if the person was unwell for a while, it can still be a shock. We all have our own ways of grieving. While nobody can take away the pain, there is support available to help you cope. Contents: What is grief?; Feelings you might experience when someone you love dies; Interactions with other people; Frequently asked questions about bereavement, loss and grief; How can I help myself?.

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