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Publications directory

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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 39

Cover image of 'A new kind of normal'

A new kind of normal (2018)

Self-published

They say there’s a book in all of us, but I doubt I would ever have written one had it not have been for my diagnosis of breast cancer in 2011. ‘A New Kind of Normal' is the story of my life up to and moving on from that moment. Growing up in the 60's, working through the 70's and 80's, juggling a career in TV and radio while bringing up three children and surviving two divorces. From the moment I knew what a bra was, I’d wanted breasts: I even crafted a pair of blue plasticine boobs for myself, as nature made me wait until I was 15 for breasts of my own! Through cancer I lost them both, and with the chemotherapy; all my hair, my fingernails, and more worryingly, a sense of whom I was. My hair grew back, as did my fingernails, but I still struggled with my identity. What I’ve written isn't a diary, nor a self-help guide, and it's not just about cancer. I’ve taken a really good look at the little girl I was and the woman I grew into, and why I went to such lengths to try and claw back some of what cancer had taken from me - it's not everyone's way I appreciate, and it’s been an interesting exercise trying to ascertain why it was mine! I’ve been honest, open, and meticulous when it comes to detail, as I firmly believe that if you take away the mystery, you can take away some of the fear. But there’s a lot to laugh about here too, as luckily I’ve always been able to see the funny side of a situation, preferring that to the occasional overwhelming despair I felt. In this book I've tried to move the disease away from the medical professionals and the hospitals, and to bring it into the day to day, because that's where it sits. Over the last seven years I’ve come to realise that the ripple effect of cancer is far reaching, affecting not just those of us living with it but everyone around us. 'A New Kind of Normal' gives an insight into my relationship with my then partner, now husband; my children and their reaction to my illness, my family and friends, my work colleagues, people who wrote to me, and the professionals who cared for me; everybody reacts differently. Breast cancer assaults your femininity - the treatment is tough and the surgery brutal.  It isn't easy, but it is possible, and I'd like to feel this book may be a source of comfort to anyone who's life is touched by breast cancer; maybe even help them to find their 'New Kind of Normal'. There are many things in life we may have to give up on, but hope is not one of them. (P

Cover image of 'Brain tumours and epilepsy'

Brain tumours and epilepsy (2017)

Brain Tumour Action

This booklet explains what epilepsy is, the types of seizures, how it is diagnosed,and treatment options. it also has tips on people can help themselves, what family and friends should do if someone has a seizure, and how seizures may affect daily life (driving, work, home life, sport). 

Cover image of 'My fatigue book. A resource to help you understand, manage and own fatigue'

My fatigue book. A resource to help you understand, manage and own fatigue (September 2017)

Brainstrust

This resource aims to enable patients and caregivers living with a brain tumour to understand what is meant by fatigue and to self-manage fatigue relating to brain tumours so that they: learn a new pace of living; take steps to mitigate the impact of fatigue; and make the most of what they can do, rather than what they can’t.

Cover image of 'Living with lymphoma'

Living with lymphoma (August 2017)

Lymphoma Action

Detailed information about living with lymphoma.

Cover image of 'My child has finished treatment. What happens next? A guide to follow-up and adjusting to normal life for
parents and carers whose child or teenager has finished treatment for cancer'

My child has finished treatment. What happens next? A guide to follow-up and adjusting to normal life for parents and carers whose child or teenager has finished treatment for cancer (July 2017)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This booklet for the parents and carers of children with cancer aims to help answer some of the many questions that arise when treatment finishes. It discusses feelings and emotions, practical issues, school, and moving on.

Cover image of 'Pelvic floor exercises for men'

Pelvic floor exercises for men (August 2017)

Prostate Scotland

This leaflet describes the pelvic floor muscles and the exercises that men can use to strengthen them.

Cover image of 'Signs and symptoms of cancer and how to reduce your risk'

Signs and symptoms of cancer and how to reduce your risk (March 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This leaflet explains how to recognise the early signs of cancer and how to reduce the risk. It describes the symptoms to look out for (unexplained bleeding, weight loss, lumps, pain) and how to reduce the risk by making lifestyle changes (smoking, diet, exercise, alcohol drinking and taking care in the sun).

Cover image of 'Chemo summer. An uplifting breast cancer experience'

Chemo summer. An uplifting breast cancer experience (2017)

Austin Macauley

In Chemo Summer Jane Hoggar takes the reader through a light-hearted and informative account of her discovery of breast cancer and its cure. Cancer of any description has the capacity to chill those it affects and their loved ones. But for Jane Hoggar early discovery and diagnosis provided for a satisfactory resolution. And it's these small details that might well help people in a similar situation. For example, Jane did not discover a lump, which is the usual thing in breast cancer, but a sag' when she raised her arms and it was her insistence that something was wrong that resulted in a vital early medical diagnosis. All the side issues are covered in the book, effects of chemo and radiotherapy, hair loss and wigs, changes in diet and exercise, making Chemo Summer a valuable and engaging look into a serious and often frightening subject. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Making peace with the end of life. A clear and comforting guide to help you live well to the last'

Making peace with the end of life. A clear and comforting guide to help you live well to the last (2017)

Creative Pumpkin Publishing

From GP and hospice doctor Patrick Fitzgerald and bestselling author Sarah Rayner (Making Friends with Anxiety, One Moment, One Morning) comes a warm and wise companion to help support you and those caring for you in the last months, weeks and days of life. From the shock of diagnosis, through treatment options and symptom control to the process of dying itself, Making Peace with the End of Life tackles these sensitive issues with compassion and honesty. Full of practical advice and important contact information, it will also help to demystify how the NHS and Social Services work, so you can access the best support more easily. And, drawing on Patrick’s extensive clinical experience, it also looks at how communicating your wishes to those involved in your care can give a feeling of safety and control over whatever happens in the future. There are tips on self-nurturing using diet, light exercise and alternative therapies, plus guidance on how to care for your own mental health – including advice for carers. And for those who are anxious about what lies ahead, patient stories and quotes from those who’ve been there help to explain what to expect, thereby easing worry and panic so you feel less alone. Offset by Sarah’s joyful illustrations, the result is a clear and compassionate guide that aims to make these complex and distressing issues less confusing and overwhelming, so each individual can live the life they have left with a greater sense of comfort and peace. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Eating well following treatment and recovery from cancer. A guide for patients and carers'

Eating well following treatment and recovery from cancer. A guide for patients and carers (February 2016)

Christie Hospital NHS Trust

Advice about what to eat and what not to eat following treatment. 

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