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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 506

Cover image of 'An ABC of prostate cancer today. My journey over 4 continents to find the best cure'

An ABC of prostate cancer today. My journey over 4 continents to find the best cure (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

“An ABC of prostate cancer today – 2nd Edition replaces its best-selling predecessor, “An ABC of prostate cancer in 2015”. The new edition provides the reader with comprehensive information on the very latest diagnosis tests that are available and now becoming routinely used in leading clinics, hospitals and specialist practice around the world. A leading urological surgeon who reviewed the book said: “All my registrars (interns) should get a copy of this book and fully digest its contents.” Another specialist said: “Every general practitioner (physician) in the country should read the book to bring them up-to- date on prostate cancer.” Not with standing these comments, the easy-to-read book, is targeted at the layman, and is written in easily understood language. The book provides the reader with more than 100 questions that prostate cancer sufferers should consider asking their doctors. It also details “My Journey over Four Continents to find the Best Cure”. The book (99,500 words over 344 pages) is presented in three parts: In Part 1, the book looks at what prostate cancer is and examines, in detail, PSA testing and its derivatives such as PSA density, PSA doubling time, free PSA, etc. It also looks in depth at the biopsy process and explains the increasing use of multiparametric MRI as a diagnostic tool. The staging and grading of prostate cancers are explained. Part 2 focusses on the 10 top treatments available to treat prostate cancer. Some of these treatments are broken down into multiple sub-sets. One such treatment is radiation, which is broken down into nine different forms of radiation, each of which is fully presented. Some of these, like proton beam therapy, might offer better alternative outcomes to some sufferers than more ‘popular’ treatments. Whilst the book focusses mainly on the treatment of patients with low and intermediate risk prostate cancer that is localised, the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer is also considered. The book considers diet and nutrition issues in detail and also has chapters on alternative treatments and a comprehensive cancer-fighting plan. This part of the book concludes with a chapter on the all-important prostate cancer support groups. Part 3 of the book details my consideration of various treatment options, my visits to three urologists and a radiation oncologist, my treatment selection process and my subsequent proton beam therapy treatment at the National Cancer Centre in Sout

Cover image of 'The shock factor. Sarah's story – beating breast cancer one day at a time'

The shock factor. Sarah's story – beating breast cancer one day at a time (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

The door handle started to turn and I knew this was the moment that could change my life forever. Mr Mahadev appeared with another staff member. He introduced himself and then introduced Sally, a breast care nurse, and sat down beside me. He started to go through my notes: family history, the results of the mammogram and the biopsy. Then he delivered the devastating news... I’m really sorry but the mammogram has shown two tumours in the left breast. Sarah Pickles was a normal 32-year-old married woman with a young daughter. On 22nd September 2014 her life changed as she was given the devastating news that she had a triple-negative breast cancer. Read about how Sarah dealt with her diagnosis and how she survived cancer as she shares all the high, lows, tears, and laughter of her journey. This honest and raw account of Sarah’s cancer journey also includes lots of information and top tips on diet, exercise, health, and beauty. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'I’m just a person. My year of death, cancer and epiphany'

I’m just a person. My year of death, cancer and epiphany (2016)

Bluebird (Pan Macmillan)

In the span of four months in 2012, Tig Notaro was hospitalized for a debilitating intestinal disease called C. diff, her mother unexpectedly died, she went through a breakup, and then she was diagnosed with bilateral breast cancer. Hit with this devastating barrage, Tig took her grief onstage. Days after receiving her cancer diagnosis, she broke new comedic ground, opening an unvarnished set with the words: 'Good evening. Hello. I have cancer. How are you? Hi, how are you? Is everybody having a good time? I have cancer.' The set instantly went viral, and was ultimately released as Tig's sophomore album, Live, which sold one hundred thousand units in just six weeks and was later nominated for a Grammy. Now, the wildly popular star takes stock of that no good, very bad year - a difficult yet astonishing period in which tragedy turned into absurdity and despair transformed into joy. An inspired combination of the deadpan silliness of her comedy and the open-hearted vulnerability that has emerged in the wake of that dire time, I'm Just a Person is a moving and often hilarious look at this very brave, very funny woman's journey into the darkness and her thrilling return from it. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The living well with cancer cookbook. An essential guide to nutrition, lifestyle and health'

The living well with cancer cookbook. An essential guide to nutrition, lifestyle and health (2016)

Bantam Press (imprint of Transworld Publications)

When authors Fran Warde and Catherine Zabilowicz met at the Maggie’s centre at Charing Cross Hospital in London, they quickly discovered they shared a passion for good food and healthy eating. They also realized that with their combined knowledge and experience – Fran as an acclaimed food writer, and Catherine as an experienced nutritional therapist working at Maggie’s – they could provide invaluable guidance for anyone living with cancer, their families and friends. The Living Well With Cancer Cookbook, published in support of the Maggie’s charity, is the result of Fran and Catherine’s collaboration. Aimed at helping readers through each stage of their journey – diagnosis, during and after treatment – this essential guide is packed with advice on nutrition and health and offers a range of delicious recipes. There are healthy twists on classic favourites and tempting new treats to try, with every ingredient considered for its health benefits. Positive and empowering, the book contains a wealth of information on the best food choices to make, and reveals why many scientists today believe that certain foods and a balanced diet are crucial in sustaining strength throughout treatment. Taking a holistic approach, this book also seeks to alleviate anxieties, such as those concerning weight-loss, loss of appetite and the changes in how food tastes. Above all, the simple, comforting recipes will help both experienced cooks and novices to create nutritious, easily adapted meals – from breakfast right through to dinner – each one designed to nourish and sustain. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'In gratitude'

In gratitude (2016)

Bloomsbury Publishing

The future flashed before my eyes in all its pre-ordained banality. Embarrassment, at first, to the exclusion of all other feelings. But embarrassment curled at the edges with a weariness. I got a joke in. 'So - we'd better get cooking the meth,' I said to the Poet. In August 2014, Jenny Diski was diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer and given 'two or three years' to live. She didn't know how to react. All responses felt scripted, laden with cliché. Being a writer, she decided to write about it (grappling with the unoriginality even of this), and also to tell a story she has not yet told: that of being taken in, aged fifteen, by the author Doris Lessing, and the subsequent fifty years of their complex relationship. In September 2014 Jenny Diski began writing in the London Review of Books, describing her experience of living with terminal cancer, examining her life and history with Doris Lessing: the fairy-tale rescue from 'the bin' as a teenager, the difficulties of being absorbed into an unfamiliar family and the influence this had on her. Swooping from one memory to the next - alighting on the hysterical battlefield of her parental home, her expulsion from school, stacking shelves in Banbury and the drug-taking twenty-something in and out of psychiatric hospitals, Diski paints a portrait of two extraordinary writers - Lessing and herself. From one of our most original voices comes a book like no other: a cerebral, witty, dazzlingly candid masterpiece about an uneasy relationship; about memory and writing, ingratitude and anger; about living with illness and facing death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Mummy's lump'

Mummy's lump (April 2015)

Breast Cancer Care

This book is aimed at children under six and follows Elly and Jack as they learn of their mother's diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer. Also available as a read-aloud iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch download, read by Zoe Wanamaker (free iOS version or download from iTunes).

Cover image of 'Your guide to cervical screening (smear test)'

Your guide to cervical screening (smear test) (June 2015)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

Every day eight women are diagnosed with cervical cancer and three die from the disease. Yet cervical cancer is largely preventable thanks to the NHS cervical screening programme and HPV vaccination programme. In the UK 22% of UK women do not attend their cervical screening (smear test) invitation. This short film aims to give you more information about smear tests: what the test is for and what will happen during the test. It also has information on Human Papillomavirus (HPV), a virus which is the main cause of cervical cancer and cervical abnormalities. The DVD (£5.00) includes versions in Arabic, Bengali Standard, Bengali Sylheti, Chinese, Hindi, Polish, Tamil, and Urdu. You can also watch all versions online.

Cover image of 'Fast facts: Multiple myeloma and plasma cell dyscrasias'

Fast facts: Multiple myeloma and plasma cell dyscrasias (2015)

Health Press

Multiple myeloma accounts for approximately 0.8% of cancers worldwide, with about 114 000 new cases each year. Rapid progress is being made in the development of new treatments and, although myeloma is incurable at present, survival has almost tripled over the past 10 years and it is now projected that a third of patients will survive more than 10 years after diagnosis. Fast Facts: Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Dyscrasias emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis for a favourable outcome, covers the ever-increasing role of genetics in diagnosis and treatment, and discusses new and gold-standard treatments. A chapter on supportive care also features and briefs the reader on long-term outcomes and quality of life issues. Although primarily intended for health care professionals, this highly readable resource may be of interest to patients wanting to know more about multiple myeloma and plasma cell dyscrasias. Written for doctors, read by patients too. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'We beat leukaemia. My family's journey with childhood cancer'

We beat leukaemia. My family's journey with childhood cancer (2015)

Self-published using I_AM Self-Publishing

My son Andrew was only three years old when he was diagnosed with Leukaemia. Now he’s a healthy, happy six-year-old. We Beat Leukemia is my honest account of chemo, childhood and being a mummy to cancer – written over 1235 days from diagnosis to remission. I started writing daily posts to record the highs and lows, frustrations and elations of his childhood cancer treatment. My posts and photos form this book. I’m sharing my family’s experience to raise awareness of childhood cancer (and the UK charities who can offer so much), but also to offer support to families facing the challenges that any child cancer diagnosis brings. I hope to make a difference in the cancer community. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Managing prostate cancer. A guide for living better'

Managing prostate cancer. A guide for living better (2015)

Oxford University Press

The statistics are sobering: over 200,000 men in the United States are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year. With this diagnosis, men are expected to psychologically combat the worry, practical concerns, and the emotional and physical changes during an immensely trying time. How to help? In Managing Prostate Cancer: A Guide for Living Better, Dr. Andrew J. Roth, a psychiatrist specializing in psychological support for cancer patients, provides the emotional skills and strategies necessary to help patients deal with the challenges a prostate cancer diagnosis brings to everyday life. These tools, which Dr. Roth terms Emotional Judo, effectively teach patients to identify what their fears are rooted in, how to distinguish the rational and irrational aspects of their thoughts and behaviors, make healthier choices to promote a more positive approach, and ultimately transform their lives into a more fulfilling and peaceful journey. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cancer survivorship coping tools - we'll get you through this'

Cancer survivorship coping tools - we'll get you through this (2015)

Ayni Books

Hearing the words “You have cancer” can be devastating - some cancer patients even say that the emotional pain and loss of certainty from hearing this are worse than the pains from the cancer, surgeries, radiation, chemotherapy, and other treatments. This is the intimate journey of a melanoma and breast cancer survivor who honestly, and sometimes even humorously, shares her own story and offers supportive emotional tools to help people diagnosed with cancer, and their loved ones and caregivers, work through the emotional pain and upheaval of a cancer diagnosis. You will be supported in knowing what it feels like to hear you have cancer and be given a variety of helpful ideas to start feeling better whether you are newly diagnosed, in treatment, or months or years after treatment. If you are a caregiver, friend, or family member who wants to help, you will get a better understanding of the cancer experience as well as tools to help the person you care about. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Swimming with the tide'

Swimming with the tide (2015)

Stourcastle Books

I wanted to write this book to share my experience of dealing with a challenge that many women face. It's not dark, it's not gloomy. It's not filled with photos that will make you weep. I've tried to capture my emotions at the time, including the humour. Every diagnosis is different, every account is different. This is mine. All royalties paid to me by Amazon are being donated to Macmillan Cancer Support. (Author) 

Cover image of 'Staying alive. How to get the best from the NHS'

Staying alive. How to get the best from the NHS (2015)

Quercus

The NHS is our most treasured institution, but even caring doctors have too many patients and too little time, while patients often feel too overwhelmed, embarrassed, intimidated or ill to ask the right questions. Your chances of getting the best care that's right for you are greatly improved if you are able to share in decisions about your treatment. In Staying Alive, Dr Phil Hammond, a GP and campaigner with unrivalled sympathy for patients' needs, helps give you the confidence and the tools to take control of your health care, and shows you in a friendly but authoritative way how to navigate the system. This book will show you how to get your GP to listen to you and take your symptoms seriously, how to get hold of your patient records so you can ensure they're correct, how to get a second opinion and, most importantly, how to get better (and in turn help make the NHS better too). (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A life turned upside down'

A life turned upside down (2015)

Little Knoll Press

The story of young mum, Nikki Hastings, who went to her doctor with a painful hip and several days later was given a diagnosis of terminal cancer with only months to live. Due to her willingness to try new treatments and determination to make the best of her remaining time, Nikki’s life was extended by years. This is her story. The author’s royalty and all profit from sales of this book will be donated to Lewis-Manning Hospice. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A guide to survivorship for women who have ovarian cancer'

A guide to survivorship for women who have ovarian cancer (2015)

Johns Hopkins University Press

This updated and expanded second edition offers a wealth of information to ease the physical and emotional suffering of women who have ovarian cancer. The expert authors include highly respected and experienced oncologists, gynecologic oncology nurse specialists, researchers, and ovarian cancer survivors. Throughout the book they emphasize the concepts of survivorship, or living life well in the face of daunting uncertainties, and self-determination: the right of each patient to be informed, involved, and in control of her care. Detailed information on diagnosis and treatment, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, pain management, and integrative medicine, constitutes a key feature of the book. Also covered in depth are image recovery, nutrition, pain control, and genetic testing. Women who have ovarian cancer share advice on coping with the life-changing disease and its treatments. Offering candor, compassion, and hope, this remarkable book explains how to add quality to your life and take care of medical and social needs while living with ovarian cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'There's something I've been dying to tell you'

There's something I've been dying to tell you (2014)

Coronet (Hodder & Stoughton)

In 2013 Lynda Bellingham was diagnosed with cancer. Having kept the details of her illness private, now for the very first time Lynda talks with beautiful poignancy about her life since her diagnosis, her family and how together they came to terms with a future they hadn't planned. Having been told that she only has a matter of months left to live and writing this in what will be her final days, There's something I’ve been dying to tell you is a brave and brutally honest memoir and yet Lynda also manages to spread her infectious warmth and humour, bringing light to a very dark time. Woven into this very moving and brave story are extraordinary, colourful tales of her acting and family life that will enlighten and entertain as well as the journey that Lynda has taken to find the family of her birth father having already suffered heartache in her search for her birth mother. In the search for her father's family, Lynda finds a family with a history in entertainment showing that acting was always in the blood. Lynda Bellingham was a tremendously gifted storyteller with a rich collection of tales of love, loss and laughter and this book brings her kind heart, courage and emotion to the page in vivid detail. Lynda's story is an affecting and at times heart-breaking one but it is so often laugh-out-loud too and ultimately the way Lynda tells her life story will serve as a great inspiration. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The smear test film'

The smear test film (2014)

Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

'The Smear Test Film' is a health education film resource for women eligible for cervical screening (smear tests) who have mild and moderate learning disabilities. It has been made by Public Health England in association with Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust. Professional guidance and support in the development of this resource was provided by the Better Health Team for Learning Disabilities at Somerset Partnership NHS Foundation Trust. The film has been designed and made by women who have learning disabilities. It aims to give women and their carers information about smear tests and their role in preventing cervical cancer and help women make a decision about whether to attend their smear test invitation.

Cover image of 'Getting off the emotional roller coaster of cancer. A toolbox for patients, survivors, family members and caregivers'

Getting off the emotional roller coaster of cancer. A toolbox for patients, survivors, family members and caregivers (2014)

Anchor Rose Publishing

You sit across the desk from your doctor – and you learn you have cancer. As though you just got on a racing roller coaster, you’re suddenly overwhelmed with fear, anxiety, grief and depression. The journey with cancer begins. Are you prepared emotionally? Medical treatments for cancer continue to advance, yet tools to help cancer patients address their emotional wellbeing still lag behind. Physicians and psychologists now realize that healing is often greatly improved when both the physical and emotional needs of patients are met. In Getting Off the Emotional Roller Coaster of Cancer, cancer psychotherapist Niki Barr gently guides you through diagnosis, medical treatment and beyond. This groundbreaking book gives you effective, easy-to-use tools to manage your journey through cancer with confidence and calm. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cancer is my teacher'

Cancer is my teacher (2014)

Quartet Books

Every two minutes someone in the UK is diagnosed with cancer. Lucy O'Donnell was herself three years ago. Cancer is My Teacher is her story, describing unflinchingly how she has turned the disease into a positive experience - and how you can do the same. Lucy's approach is determined but disciplined, clinical but also holistic. By addressing the physical, emotional, and spiritual aspects of cancer, Lucy covers the whole spectrum of the disease - including how to tell the family, the dos and donts of communicating with a patient, the side-effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy - and gives practical advice on how to keep looking your best and even what to pack for surgery. Cancer is My Teacher offers guidance for anyone in the early stages of diagnosis, in treatment or trying to readjust afterwards. It also helps family and loved ones to understand what they're going through - and, above all, carries a message of hope for everyone touched by cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Toby the teapot's daddy has a poorly lid'

Toby the teapot's daddy has a poorly lid (2014)

Paula and Richard Middleton

A short story for children that uses accessible characters to help explain to a child about a parent being diagnosed with a brain tumour. It follows Toby the teapot's daddy through the journey of the first signs and symptoms, diagnosis and treatment.

Cover image of 'The diary of a mother, her son and his monster'

The diary of a mother, her son and his monster (2014)

Empire Publications

Caroline Burch experienced every parent's worst nightmare when her son Elliot was diagnosed with cancer when he was just six months old. To document her experiences she kept a diary detailing the ups and downs of her son's treatment and the emotional anguish of their situation from diagnosis to remission. Ten years later, and with Elliot happily recovered from the condition that threatened his life, Caroline looks back at the traumatic months when there appeared to be no end in sight to the misery. Caroline's story is proof that there is life after cancer and this book is a tribute to the tireless work of the individuals who help parents and their children emerge from their nightmare. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer Olympics'

The cancer Olympics (2014)

Self-published using Friesen press

Diagnosed with a late-stage cancer, after years of bungled and inadequate medical attention...and then to discover that the best-practice chemotherapy is not available in your province. After her delayed diagnosis of colorectal cancer, Robin McGee reaches out to her community using a blog entitled "Robin's Cancer Olympics." Often uplifting and humourous, the blog posts and responses follow her into the harsh landscape of cancer treatment, medical regulation, and provincial politics. If she and her supporters are to be successful in lobbying the government for the chemotherapy, she must overcome many formidable and frightening hurdles. And time is running out. . . A true story, The Cancer Olympics is a suspenseful and poignant treatment of an unthinkable situation, an account of advocacy and survival that explores our deepest values regarding democracy, medicine, and friendship. www.thecancerolympics.com (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer survivor's companion. Practical ways to cope with your feelings after cancer'

The cancer survivor's companion. Practical ways to cope with your feelings after cancer (2013)

Piatkus (Little, Brown Book Group)

Coping with life after cancer can be tough. The idea that the end of successful treatment brings relief and peace just isn't true for countless survivors. Many feel unexpectedly alone, worried and adrift. You're supposed to be getting your life 'back on track' but your life has changed. You have changed. With reassurance and understanding, Dr Frances Goodhart and Lucy Atkins help readers deal with the emotional fallout of cancer whether it's days, months or years since the treatment ended. Drawing on Dr Goodhart's extensive experience working in the NHS with cancer survivors, this guide is packed with practical and simple self-help tools to tackle issues such as worry and anxiety, depression and low mood, anger, low self-esteem and body image, relationships and sex, fatigue, sleep and relaxation. If you are a cancer survivor, this book will support you every step of the way. If you are supporting a loved one, friend, colleague or your patient, this is a vital read. Winner of the 2012 Best Health Book category in the Guild of Health Writers Awards and highly commended in the Popular Medicine category at the BMA Medical Book Awards 2012 this is the first UK book to look in depth at cancer survivorship and its emotional fallout. Government statistics indicate around 2 million people in the UK survive for at least 5 years post diagnosis and this figure is set to increase. This book will be an invaluable resource. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Emotional support through breast cancer. The alternative handbook'

Emotional support through breast cancer. The alternative handbook (2013)

Radcliffe Publishing

This compassionate guide presents an array of new perspectives on the emotional effects of breast cancer and includes many personal testimonies from women who have been diagnosed with this disease. Written by a breast cancer survivor and practising psychologist, it shares practical ideas to help support sufferers at all stages, be it at diagnosis, during treatment or during life after the initial treatments are over. The concise, easy-to-read format includes exercises to develop an acceptance of thoughts and feelings, whilst the individual accounts validate the multitude of emotions felt by sufferers. It is a must for all breast cancer patients and sufferers, their families and friends. Its real-life approach, using first hand accounts, is also highly recommended for all health and social care professionals wanting a fresh approach to managing the emotional impacts of breast cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The dog, the chick and the reindeer. The story of a family living with cancer'

The dog, the chick and the reindeer. The story of a family living with cancer (2013)

Apollo Publishing

In 2004 my mother asked us to donate to the Macmillan team in lieu of a present. It is ironic that she then developed and survived endometrial cancer in 2006 and was diagnosed with and died from ovarian cancer in 2012, especially as the Macmillan team supported us to keep her in the home she loved right to the end. The story tells of the effects of both cancers on Mum and the rest of the family. Naturally there were sad times and some excruciatingly painful and stressful times but there were also some funny and touching moments. Audrey, Mum's sister was coincidentally diagnosed with oesophageal cancer and at one point they were in different wards at opposite ends of the same hospital. The day we were told of Mum’s diagnosis, we wheeled her down to sit with Audrey and they held hands and hugged, one in a wheelchair and the other hooked up to all kinds of machinery. Audrey died thirteen days after mum. There is no doubt that my mother loved her family - she had nearly ninety children, grandchildren, great grandchildren and great, great grandchildren, both biological and adopted; whilst the story is written from my perspective, I wasn't the only one to suffer and it could easily have been written by thirty or forty other people. When I found out mum had a terminal illness I made up my mind to take her back to her home, which is the only place she wanted to be; some people thought I was mad but we had a dedicated team of family and were lucky to be further supported by her GP, the DN’s and Macmillan team. I organised weekly rotas to ensure 24 hour care: The book tells how we coped with this and of my panic the day I found out the Macmillan support team didn’t have any sitters for the following week. It also portrays the “normal” things we did along as we rode our six year emotional roller coaster, such as going on holidays and dealing with other family crises. The last twelve months before her death were intolerable. The last six months a nightmare, and the ten weeks between diagnosis and her passing were hell on earth but we had some laughs, we cried and we sang songs. A few weeks before she died, as my daughter entered the room Mum was playing a game with my younger grandchildren, throwing the tiny purple chick to each of them in turn and giggling along with them, its tail flashing as though it too was enjoying the fun. I initially wrote the book to help me deal with my own grief, stress and feelings of guilt that I was glad she had finally let g

Cover image of 'The pink moon lovelies. Empowering stories of survival'

The pink moon lovelies. Empowering stories of survival (2013)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

The Pink Moon Lovelies are members of the Facebook group Beyond the Pink Moon, named after Nicki Boscia Durlester’s memoir that intimately chronicles her journey after a breast cancer diagnosis. Nicki created the group to provide an active forum for discussion to raise awareness about the BRCA gene and breast and ovarian cancer. She never dreamed her homespun story would travel around the globe and Beyond the Pink Moon would become a support group for people from all walks of life coming together to lift each other up with inspiration, humor, faith and love. With Lovelies in Australia, Canada, England, France, Ireland, Israel, Mexico, Namibia, New Zealand, Singapore, Slovakia, South Africa, Sweden, Tasmania and the USA, Nicki, a BRCA2 survivor, and fellow moderator, Melissa Johnson Voight, a BRCA1 previvor, whose journey of steadfast faith and courage of conviction is included in this book, have encouraged their members to tell their stories with one goal in mind, to save lives. With a Foreword written by renowned breast surgeon, Dr. Kristi Funk, this riveting collection of 50 stories includes: the unflinching account of Barbie Ritzco, a United States Marine who kept silent about discovering a lump in her breast in order to deploy with her unit to Afghanistan, putting her country before her health, the moving story of Ally Durlester, Nicki’s daughter, a 25 year old BRCA2 previvor who will undergo prophylactic surgery to try to avoid the same fate as her mother, grandmother and six great-aunts who all had breast, ovarian or fallopian tube cancer, the frustrating story of Erika Grogin Lange, an Israeli Lovely and mother of five, whose nagging symptoms of fatigue, nausea and bloating went undiagnosed for months until she heard the shocking news that she had Stage III ovarian cancer, and the unpredictable journey of Susan Long Martucci, a two-time breast cancer survivor, disease free for 13 years, blindsided by another diagnosis. She is the beacon of hope who coined the term Pink Moon Lovelies. Each story is compelling and has an important message to impart. The Pink Moon Lovelies, Empowering Stories of Survival concludes with the story of the incomparable May Smith, the 32 year old South African Lovely who left a legacy of extraordinary courage, grace and love. Hers was a life well lived. When May sadly passed away on July 22, 2012 from breast cancer she left the Pink Moon Lovelies with one final message filled with wisdom and advice beyond her years. H

Cover image of 'My journey'

My journey (2013)

Penguin

In July 2009, Jim Stynes was diagnosed with cancer and given less than a year to live. The diagnosis caught him by surprise - he was 42, healthy, fit - and he didn't have time for illness: he was director of a foundation for young people, president of Melbourne Football Club, father of two primary school-aged kids, husband of Sam. Knowing his odds weren't good, but with so much to lose, Jim put everything he had into trying to beat the disease. He was well equipped to beat the odds - he'd been getting the most out of himself in every aspect of life since his childhood in Dublin. Jim's ability to use mind over matter and his will to succeed gave him two extra years on the prognosis. He had more than 25 tumours removed from his brain and stomach, and defied expectations time and time again. This book is Jim's legacy. Unflinching in its detail, Jim talks about what he found out about himself when things were at their worst - about what really counts when you're stacking it all up. It's a moving, inspiring story of a life lived fearlessly. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'I felt a right one... and now I feel a right one again'

I felt a right one... and now I feel a right one again (2013)

Matador

“Whilst in the bath I lay back and take a look at my 'bigger than I would really like' body and focus on my chest. My G cup breasts are not difficult to miss, even with my poor eyesight, but what I see makes me sit up straight. It looks like my right nipple is 'not on straight'. I put my glasses on and have a really good look, then start to gently feel my whole right breast. I feel the left one for good measure and can definitely detect a lump on the right side...” This is the true story of Karen Tighe, an ordinary woman, and her journey through discovery, diagnosis, treatment and reconstruction. Amusing and thoughtfully written, it is particularly helpful in describing the physical, emotional and psychological processes that a patient can go through - and how that impacts upon their life, and that of their family. Karen's aim in writing the book was to make cancer less frightening and anyone who is either suffering from cancer, or knows someone who is, will find the book to be of great help. Karen Tighe is donating the profits from her book to St Luke's Hospice and Breast Cancer Care. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cellmates. Our lessons in cancer, life, love and loss'

Cellmates. Our lessons in cancer, life, love and loss (2013)

Saraband

I'm Rose. John and I shared nearly eight years of our lives together. For the last three years of our relationship cancer anchored us together. That's not as grim as it might sound. This is our story. A story of how two ordinary people live with the diagnosis, the check-ups, the disappointments, the relief, the questions, the answers, the operations, the recovery, the emergencies, the denial, the acceptance, the anger, the pain, the loss, the love, the fear, the frustration - and the happiness. Shortly before he died, John made Rose promise to share their story - to tell what they had learned, practically and emotionally, and convey the hope they found even in the darkest of times. He had discovered her hidden stash of letters and diary entries, which she'd been writing to keep herself sane, neither censoring nor intending them to be read. The result is an astonishing, searingly honest, real-time account that reveals our profound capacity for love and how the human spirit can endure the most harrowing of tests to emerge dauntless, flying free. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Tallulah tumour, friend or foe. A personal insight into a battle with a brain tumour'

Tallulah tumour, friend or foe. A personal insight into a battle with a brain tumour (2012)

Memoirs Publishing

Fiona Goldsby has emerged triumphant from the terrifying experience of suffering a serious brain tumour. She found very little written material was available to help her in her battle, so she has written Tallulah Tumour, Friend or Foe? to help others dealing with a similar diagnosis. It is intended to provide information about what the patient may expect, with hints and tips to deal with the various side effects. The information in the book will not only be helpful to patients but to caregivers and family members. And as you may guess from the title, there is plenty of humour as well. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Riddance'

Riddance (2012)

Worple

On Valentine's Day, 2006, Anthony Wilson was formally diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a cancer of the lymphatic system. 'Beginning with what happened', the poems in Riddance chart the progress of his treatment for this disease, from initial diagnosis to the uncertain territory of remission. Even more essentially, they recover and celebrate all that is most fundamental and affirming about the act of living. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Table for one, Sir?'

Table for one, Sir? (2012)

Austin Macauley

In this deeply poignant and personal memoir, John Flint recounts the experience of his wife Patricia s diagnosis with cancer, her death, and his efforts to readjust to life afterwards. John uses his own experiences to explore some of the wider issues about how society responds to terminal illness, death, and widowhood. But, in a book that is touching, warm, and wise, John focuses on some of the realities of each stage from caring for a terminally ill loved one to learning to live as a widower. In doing so, John provides an insight into the real emotions and experiences of a carer and widower. He provides thoughts on the practicalities of what to expect from experiences such as the first Christmas as a widower, going on holiday alone, and the well-meant comments of others; and, in a life where the tears are only an eyelid away, he provides ideas on how to deal with them. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Mum's list. A mother's life lessons to the husband and sons she left behind'

Mum's list. A mother's life lessons to the husband and sons she left behind (2012)

Penguin

On her deathbed, Kate Greene's only concern was for her two little boys, Reef and Finn, and her loving husband, Singe. She knew she'd be leaving them behind very soon. Over her last few days, Kate created Mum's List. The couple talked and cried together as she wrote her thoughts and wishes down, trying to help the man she loved create the best life for their boys after she was gone. It wasn't the first time Singe and Kate had faced the spectre of death. Four years earlier, doctors discovered a large lump in baby Reef's abdomen. Kate, pregnant with Finn, was so distressed that she gave birth dangerously early. Both boys pulled through, but afterwards Kate received the diagnosis that every woman dreads (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The topic of cancer'

The topic of cancer (2012)

Jessica Richards

The Topic of Cancer takes a completely new look at the disease which currently affects around one in every 200 people at some point in their lives. It is first and foremost, a manual, designed for those diagnosed with cancer but also for their friends, family and support networks. It is packed with good ideas and advice, as to how different aspects of cancer and health can be addressed, and how we can help each other through difficult times. There are chapters on how to cope with diagnosis, what questions to ask, how to manage your time, and choose your support network. There is a powerful section on positive thinking, and how to boost your mental strength, and a hugely practical section on diet, complete with recipes and store-cupboard ideas. There are chapters on what to say to someone who has been diagnosed with cancer, (and what not to say) and how to be a valuable source of help. All these are backed up with anecdotes and real life experience from Jessica, and shot through with her irrepressible and life-enhancing humour. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Go with the flow'

Go with the flow (2012)

Quartet Books

Diagnosed with breast cancer, internationally renowned photographer Gemma Levine determined to use her skill and connections to write a book about her experience that would be a companion, a resource, an aide and, finally, a practical guide to the incredible journey all cancer patients must travel if they are to regain control of their life. Medical practitioners, researchers, support staff, therapists, even make-up experts and a cordon bleu cook have gladly contributed accounts that, added together, provide a book of bountiful insights and comfort. A unique series of pool exercises which Gemma created for herself are included as an appendix. It is, in the end, overcoming the fear of and guilt about the suddenness of the diagnosis and the myriad unknown factors in coping with the treatment of cancer where this remarkable book will prove its worth. The skill and artistry of Gemma's black and white photographs contribute an additional, dynamic quality that captures the humanity and, ultimately, the love so many people involved in the treatment and help of cancer patients bring to bear. This book is, above all, a message of practical hope. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The fault in our stars'

The fault in our stars (2011)

Penguin

Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel's story is about to be completely rewritten. Insightful, bold, irreverent, and raw, The Fault in Our Stars is award-winning author John Green's most ambitious and heartbreaking work yet, brilliantly exploring the funny, thrilling, and tragic business of being alive and in love. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer journey. Positive steps to help yourself heal'

The cancer journey. Positive steps to help yourself heal (2011)

Noble House

'The Cancer Journey. Positive steps to help yourself heal' is an inspirational and compelling book which provides the blueprint for dealing with cancer and is the book of choice for anyone affected by this disease. The authors, Polly, Pam and Nick have all had their own different cancer diagnoses, and feel passionate about sharing the information they have gathered which has helped them understand and cope throughout their journeys. The book is written in a warm, compassionate style with gentle humour, offering comfort and practical advice for anyone affected by cancer including family and friends. What should you eat, what shouldn't you eat? How do you deal with the side-effects? How do you politely tell others 'I have cancer' without triggering an uncomfortable silence! How to prepare for medical appointments and get the best out of your doctors. What can family and friends do to help? This book tells you things you need to know that your health care professionals may not tell you. Whether you have a diagnosis yourself, or you know someone with cancer, this book gives you the tools to empower yourself to take control and it offers advice and guidance to support you throughout your journey. When you arm yourself with knowledge of how to help yourself, you become an empowered participant in your own health. We will walk you through your diagnosis and give you permission and the tools to take control of your situation no matter where you are on the journey. This book gives you all of the information you need to make a difference in your health. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'How I said Bah! to cancer. A guide to thinking, laughing, living and dancing your way through cancer'

How I said Bah! to cancer. A guide to thinking, laughing, living and dancing your way through cancer (2011)

Hay House

This book tells how one woman said 'Bah!' to cancer through thinking strategies, a proactive approach to treatment, and a determination to keep the rest of her life going and retain a sense of humour (most of the time!). It shares everything she learnt along the way, from the nature of cancer cells and chemotherapy drugs, to how she was able to help her friends and family to help her. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Enjoy every sandwich. Living each day as if it were your last'

Enjoy every sandwich. Living each day as if it were your last (2011)

Bantam Press (imprint of Transworld Publications)

As medical director of the famed Preventive Medicine Research Institute, Lee Lipsenthal helped thousands of patients struggling with disease to overcome their fears of pain and death and to embrace a more joyful way of living. In his own life, happily married and the proud father of two remarkable children, Lee was similarly committed to living his life fully and gratefully each day. The power of those beliefs were tested in July 2009, when he was diagnosed with esophageal cancer, leaving him with a 90 percent chance of dying within five years. As Lee and his wife, Kathy, navigated his diagnosis, illness, and treatment, he discovered that he did not fear death, and that even as he was facing his own mortality, he felt more fully alive than ever before. In the tradition of Don't Sweat the Small Stuff, Tuesdays with Morrie and The Last Lecture, Enjoy Every Sandwich distils everything Lee learned about how we find meaning, purpose, and peace in our lives. Told with humour and heart, this deeply inspiring book will help readers embrace their humanity, accept uncertainty, and live a life of gratitude - whether they are facing the end now or not. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Being Sarah'

Being Sarah (2011)

Wordscapes

Being Sarah is Sarah Horton's personal story about breast cancer. As the shock of diagnosis subsides, Sarah starts looking for a treatment plan that suits her, searching for choices, and asks questions about all the medical drugs and treatment offered to her, from chemotherapy to hormone treatment. There are so many questions: in a field where so little is certain, what's best for Sarah? Why do we concentrate on cure rather than prevention? Is our terror about breast cancer sanitised by the 'pink' movement? And will I die? And there aren’t always answers. From the minutiae of getting through each day to the wider feelings of rage, hope, sadness, fear, loss, joy and helplessness, Being Sarah is about life, death, questions, options and choices. Breast cancer statistics in the UK are alarming, and the politics surrounding the illness perplexing. Mortality rates are falling, but diagnoses are rising. One in every nine women can now expect to be diagnosed with breast cancer at some time in her life, and - while we’re getting better at surviving - it’s happening more and more frequently. Sarah Horton is one of the 46,000 women diagnosed with breast cancer in the UK every year. This is her story. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A woman's disease. The history of cervical cancer'

A woman's disease. The history of cervical cancer (2011)

Oxford University Press

Cervical cancer is an emotive disease with multiple connotations. It has stood for the horror of cancer, the curse of femininity, the hope of cutting-edge medical technologies and the promise of screening for malignant tumours. For a long time, this disease was identified with the most dreaded aspects of malignancies: prolonged invalidity and chronic pain, but also physical degradation, shame and social isolation. Cervical cancer displayed in parallel the dangers of being a woman. In the 20th century, innovations initially developed to control cervical cancer - radiotherapy and radium therapy, exfoliate cytology (Pap smear), homogenisation of the 'staging' of tumours, mass campaigns for an early detection of precancerous lesions of the cervix - set standards for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of other malignancies. In the late 20th century, cervical cancer underwent another important change. With the display of the role of selected strands of HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) in the genesis of this malignancy, it was transformed into a sexually transmitted disease. This new understanding of cervical cancer linked it more firmly with lifestyle choices, and thus increased the danger of stigmatisation of patients; on the other hand it opened the possibility for efficient prevention of this malignancy through vaccination. Ilana Lowy follows the disease from antiquity to the 21st century, focussing on the period since the mid-19th century, during which cervical cancer was dissociated from other gynaecological disorders and became a distinct entity. Following the ways in which new developments in science, medicine, and society have affected beliefs about medical progress and an individual's responsibility, gender roles, reproduction, and sex, Lowy demonstrates our understanding of what cervical cancer is, and how it can be prevented and cured. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Do I need a smear test?'

Do I need a smear test? (2010)

Health Scotland on behalf of the Family Advice and Information Resource

Illustrated booklet for women with learning difficulties. It explains what a smear test is, who should have one and when, and what the smear test will show.

Cover image of 'A guide to having a smear test'

A guide to having a smear test (2010)

Family Advice and Information Resource

Illustrated booklet for women with learning difficulties. It explains what a smear test is, why it is important to have one, and what happens during the examination.

Cover image of 'Beyond the pink moon. A memoir of legacy, loss and survival'

Beyond the pink moon. A memoir of legacy, loss and survival (2010)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

In this touching, frank and informative memoir, Nicki Boscia Durlester intimately chronicles her transformational journey after being diagnosed with breast cancer. Her story begins with her mother, who was diagnosed with the disease in 1962: a time when breast cancer was only discussed behind closed doors, and long before women took an active role in their diagnosis and treatment. Nicki provides unique insight into being part of a large Italian-American family afflicted with the BRCA2 gene, and shares poignant stories about her mother and aunts who faced breast and ovarian cancer with extraordinary grace and courage. Nicki writes candidly about her frustration in finding the right team of doctors as well as the highs and lows of her journey, sharing humor and heart along the way. She puts a human face on statistics ranking breast cancer as the second leading cause of cancer deaths in women in the United States. This deeply moving story of legacy, loss and ultimately survival is told through the eyes of a daughter who shared an unbreakable bond with her mother. As she travels the scary, unpredictable road through her own diagnosis, treatment and recovery, Nicki discovers the most difficult challenge she faces becomes the most spiritually transcendent experience of her life. This Special Edition of Beyond the Pink Moon includes an Afterword from the author. A portion of the proceeds from sales of this book will be donated to breast cancer research. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Mindfulness-based cancer recovery. A step-by-step MBSR approach to help you cope with treatment and reclaim your life'

Mindfulness-based cancer recovery. A step-by-step MBSR approach to help you cope with treatment and reclaim your life (2010)

New Harbinger Publications

If you have received a cancer diagnosis, you know that the hundreds of questions and concerns you have about what's to come can be as stressful as the cancer treatment itself. But research shows that if you mentally prepare yourself to handle cancer treatment by getting stress and anxiety under control, you can improve your quality of life and become an active participant in your own recovery. Created by leading psychologists specializing in oncology, the Mindfulness-Based Cancer Recovery program is based on mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), a therapeutic combination of mindfulness meditation and gentle yoga now offered to cancer survivors and their loved ones in hundreds of medical centers, hospitals, and clinics worldwide. Let this book be your guide as you let go of fear and focus on getting well. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The psychological impact of breast cancer: a psychologist's insights as a patient'

The psychological impact of breast cancer: a psychologist's insights as a patient (2010)

Radcliffe Publishing

What is it like to experience breast cancer? This book presents rare and valuable insights into the impact of diagnosis, treatment and prognosis from a woman who has experienced breast cancer as both patient and as health professional. It informs and educates readers about the psychological realities of living with breast cancer, of treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy, and the impact of social and historical attitudes to the breast and breast cancer on a woman's experience of the disease. The conflicts Cordelia Galgut experienced between conventional wisdom and her own first-hand experience are explored vividly and reflectively. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Intimacy after breast cancer. Dealing with your body, relationships and sex'

Intimacy after breast cancer. Dealing with your body, relationships and sex (2010)

Square One Press

Congratulations! You survived breast cancer. This should be a time to celebrate - so why do you feel so empty and alone? Medical professionals prepare you for surgery and other treatments, but do not always address your emotional and sexual health. In 'Intimacy After Breast Cancer', breast cancer survivor Gina Maisano honestly discusses the sensitive issues of self-esteem, body image, and sexuality to help you become the total woman you still are. Part One begins by examining the emotions experienced by breast cancer survivors, including anxiety and fear of recurrence. It then offers guidance on regaining the confidence to start living again. The mental and physical effects of post-surgical medications are discussed, along with solutions for maintaining optimum health. Part Two focuses on rediscovering your sexuality. In a compassionate manner, it addresses the issues that most often challenge both single and married women and presents suggestions for overcoming them. Love and intimacy do not have to end with a breast cancer diagnosis. In 'Intimacy After Breast Cancer', Gina Maisano will help you rediscover the joys of being a woman. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Connecting through compassion. Guidance for family and friends of a brain cancer patient'

Connecting through compassion. Guidance for family and friends of a brain cancer patient (2010)

Cancer Lifeline Publications

This book candidly discusses the challenges of living with the personality and behavior changes brain cancer brings, and offers practical tools to make the journey easier. Joni Aldrich and Neysa Peterson have each cared for a spouse with a brain illness. They have combined their insights in this practical, straight-talking guide. Readers will learn: symptoms a brain cancer patient may experience; how to create and maintain a warm, comfortable and safe environment; methods to use if communication becomes an issue; how to deal with changes in personality, behavior, and emotions, including loss of social inhibition skills; how to handle issues related to changes in memory and the resulting confusion; how to work through indifference, sadness, and depression towards some peace; how to cope with self-destructive behavior-safety is your number one concern; how to have end-of-life discussions and fulfil final wishes. When a family member or friend is diagnosed with cancer, life as you know it has ended. Not only must you face the chaos of doctors' visits, exhausting treatments, and sleepless nights, you must try to savor every precious moment with your loved one. When the diagnosis is brain cancer, you must endure all this plus one more challenge: the person you love may look the same, and sound the same-but he or she is not the same. His or her personality may change in extreme ways. A kind and loving person may become angry and say hurtful things. A warm, upbeat person may withdraw or behave in self-destructive ways. The essence of your loved one can disappear, even as he or she continues to live. With the tools in this book, you can continue to love and be loved during this difficult crisis. 'The last weeks of Gordon's life were spent with someone that I barely knew and didn't know how to approach. It took me two years of counseling to get through the scars. It didn't have to be that way for me. And it certainly doesn't have to be that way for you.' Joni Aldrich (Publisher)

Cover image of 'How does it feel? Reflections on a year in the life of one woman following a diagnosis of bowel cancer'

How does it feel? Reflections on a year in the life of one woman following a diagnosis of bowel cancer (2009)

Self-published using AuthorHouse

'What are you going to do now?' my teacher colleagues asked, as I packed away my things after my retirement party. I replied, 'I might like to write a book'- never guessing that the subject of the book was going to be - bowel cancer. It was only three days later that I received my diagnosis. 'How does it feel?' (reflections on a year in the life of one woman following a diagnosis of bowel cancer), is a moving story of Ann's battle with bowel cancer, through surgery and chemotherapy. It includes a journal which describes the day to day ups and downs of illness; and also an anthology of pictures and poems through which Ann expresses her inner journey. This book will provide encouragement to all who suffer from cancer. Ann's story is told with honesty and directness and this book expresses well the complexities of the cancer experience. Ann's reflections lift the spirit and offer a glimpse of the spiritual meaning found in the simple things of life, which become all the more precious at times of crisis. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Lopsided. How having breast cancer can be really distracting. A memoir'

Lopsided. How having breast cancer can be really distracting. A memoir (2008)

Virago Press (Little, Brown Book Group)

'As far as I'm concerned, Lance Armstrong and I are close to exact opposites, both physically and mentally ...If surviving this particularly deadly form of breast cancer required any of the Lance-like traits, such as a willingness to physically exert myself, I was as good as dead.' When well-meaning family and friends found out about her diagnosis, they often came armed with copies of Lance Armstrong's cancer survival book. Meredith reacted by penning a sharp, irreverent and laugh-out-loud funny memoir. More than just an account of her harrowing and, at times, hilarious treatments during her illness, Lopsided offers up entertaining memories of an offbeat life. A feisty and irreverent memoir about life and death, family and friends, and everything in between. (Publisher)

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