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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 1822

Cover image of 'A funny thing happened on the way to chemo. A rather unusual memoir'

A funny thing happened on the way to chemo. A rather unusual memoir (2018)

Short Books

"Cancer is not a laughing matter, as I was told by a cross German lady from Dortmund when I showed her this journal. She had herself had breast cancer and is right of course; there are lots of things that are not fun about cancer, most of them unavoidable. I was therefore as surprised as the next person to realise that a huge amount of funny things happen on the way to chemo, or indeed on the way to most places, and that once you get your eye in, you completely forget to be scared..." This is not just an educational book about cancer, although it is certainly safe to give to cancer patients as a cheerful present. More importantly, it sheds new light on why Kim Kardashian is worth Keeping Up With, what playlists to make for MRI scans, the truth behind the legend of Medea, bikini etiquette on a deserted beach, what to do with a glut of rainbow chard, what an Oscar-winner should say in an acceptance speech, how to deal with cold-callers selling life insurance, and what to wear on a March Against Menopause (layers, obviously)... (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A new kind of normal'

A new kind of normal (2018)

Self-published

They say there’s a book in all of us, but I doubt I would ever have written one had it not have been for my diagnosis of breast cancer in 2011. ‘A New Kind of Normal' is the story of my life up to and moving on from that moment. Growing up in the 60's, working through the 70's and 80's, juggling a career in TV and radio while bringing up three children and surviving two divorces. From the moment I knew what a bra was, I’d wanted breasts: I even crafted a pair of blue plasticine boobs for myself, as nature made me wait until I was 15 for breasts of my own! Through cancer I lost them both, and with the chemotherapy; all my hair, my fingernails, and more worryingly, a sense of whom I was. My hair grew back, as did my fingernails, but I still struggled with my identity. What I’ve written isn't a diary, nor a self-help guide, and it's not just about cancer. I’ve taken a really good look at the little girl I was and the woman I grew into, and why I went to such lengths to try and claw back some of what cancer had taken from me - it's not everyone's way I appreciate, and it’s been an interesting exercise trying to ascertain why it was mine! I’ve been honest, open, and meticulous when it comes to detail, as I firmly believe that if you take away the mystery, you can take away some of the fear. But there’s a lot to laugh about here too, as luckily I’ve always been able to see the funny side of a situation, preferring that to the occasional overwhelming despair I felt. In this book I've tried to move the disease away from the medical professionals and the hospitals, and to bring it into the day to day, because that's where it sits. Over the last seven years I’ve come to realise that the ripple effect of cancer is far reaching, affecting not just those of us living with it but everyone around us. 'A New Kind of Normal' gives an insight into my relationship with my then partner, now husband; my children and their reaction to my illness, my family and friends, my work colleagues, people who wrote to me, and the professionals who cared for me; everybody reacts differently. Breast cancer assaults your femininity - the treatment is tough and the surgery brutal.  It isn't easy, but it is possible, and I'd like to feel this book may be a source of comfort to anyone who's life is touched by breast cancer; maybe even help them to find their 'New Kind of Normal'. There are many things in life we may have to give up on, but hope is not one of them. (P

Cover image of 'On smaller dogs and larger life questions'

On smaller dogs and larger life questions (2018)

Virago Press (Little, Brown Book Group)

Coming up to her sixtieth birthday, Kate Figes found herself turning to the larger questions of family, love and life's meaning. It is like this author to examine different stages in writing, and her books - from new motherhood and adolescence to coupledom and infidelity - testify to this way of understanding herself and others: so naturally she turned to writing to explore the challenges of becoming sixty. And then - a horrible, and sudden diagnosis of breast cancer which had metastasised. Instead of a gentle journey into middle age, Kate Figes began to write for her life. Now, clawing back confidence and control was not just the ordinary business of these years: it was the only way to try and survive great pain and emotional turmoil. As her writing became an honest reflection on ageing, failing, regrets and the importance of childhood memory, friends, family and love she found a new determination to live to the full and about finding ways to face up to a shortened life expectancy with dignity. Original, passionate, funny and moving, On Smaller Dogs and Larger Life Questions will resonate with anyone dealing with the many griefs and freedoms of midlife. It is about living with a life-threatening disease but it is even more: an intelligent and passionate look at the way we can approach disappointment and trouble, friendship and love - every day. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cancer and genetics. How cancer sometimes runs in families'

Cancer and genetics. How cancer sometimes runs in families (September 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is for people who are worried that cancer might run in the family. It explains how genes work, the role of genes in the development of some cancers, how risk is inherited, and the role of genetic counselling and testing. It also includes information on preventing cancer and the role of genes in specific cancers (bowel, breast, ovarian). Includes details of useful organisations and other resources.

Cover image of 'All that followed. A story of cancer, kids and the fear of leaving too soon'

All that followed. A story of cancer, kids and the fear of leaving too soon (2018)

Mirror Books

With four children (three of them triplets!) and a relationship break-up to contend with, some things get a little lost in the mix. Like symptoms. Emma Campbell bravely and honestly offers heartfelt thoughts on what happens when cancer becomes an unwelcome guest at an already crowded party. She shares her own terror and pain, mixed with the heartwarming and unexpected. The extraordinary kindness of people and the gritty detail of battling a life-threatening illness, all while being a single mum to four children. She opens up about her angels and demons, losing and then finding love again, a constant fear of death mixed with the joy and relief of living, the anxiety of cancer returning - then facing it when it does. This book has grown from Emma's blog Me And My Four. Eager to share with her followers in more detail, the secrets, the fears, the triumphs and the terrors that she faces each day, in a life as unpredictable as your own... (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Not that kind of love. A sister, a brother, some tumours and a cat'

Not that kind of love. A sister, a brother, some tumours and a cat (2018)

Quercus

A moving, thought-provoking and surprisingly humorous book which is both a description of a journey to death and a celebration of the act of living. Based on Clare Wise's blog, which she started when she was first diagnosed with cancer in 2013, Not That Kind of Love charts the highs and lows of the last three years of Clare's life. The end result is not a book that fills you with despair and anguish. On the contrary, Not That Kind of Love should be read by everybody for its candour, and for its warmth and spirit. Clare is an astonishingly dynamic, witty and fun personality, and her positivity and energy exude from every page. As she becomes too weak to type, her brother - the actor Greg Wise - takes over, and the book morphs into a beautiful meditation on life, and the necessity of talking about death. With echoes of Atul Gawande's Being Mortal and Cathy Rentzenbrink's The Last Act of Love, it is a very special read that rejoices in the extraordinary and often underestimated sibling bond, and the importance of making the most of the ordinary pleasures life has to offer. As Greg Wise writes in the book: 'Celebrate the small things, the small moments. If you find yourself with matching socks as you leave the house in the morning, that is a cause for celebration. If the rest of the day is spent finding the cure for cancer, or brokering world peace, then that's a bonus.' (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Invasive lobular breast cancer'

Invasive lobular breast cancer (December 2017)

Breast Cancer Care

This leaflet discusses the main aspects of invasive lobular breast cancer. It describes what it is, the symptoms, how a diagnosis is made, the treatment options and coping with the diagnosis.

Cover image of 'Secondary breast cancer in the liver'

Secondary breast cancer in the liver (March 2017)

Breast Cancer Care

This booklet is for anyone diagnosed with secondary cancer in the liver that has spread from the breast. It describes what secondary breast cancer in the liver is, the possible symptoms and how they can be managed, the investigations that might be needed, and the treatment options.

Cover image of 'Secondary breast cancer in the brain'

Secondary breast cancer in the brain (June 2017)

Breast Cancer Care

A booklet for people who have been diagnosed with secondary cancer in the brain that has spread from the breast. It describes what secondary breast cancer in the brain is, what the symptoms are, and the investigations. Briefly outlines the treatment options. Lists useful organisations.

Cover image of 'Family history, genes and breast cancer'

Family history, genes and breast cancer (March 2017)

Breast Cancer Care

This booklet explains what a family history of breast cancer is, and what this may mean for you or your family.

Cover image of 'Breast prostheses, bras and clothes after surgery'

Breast prostheses, bras and clothes after surgery (December 2017)

Breast Cancer Care

This booklet provides practical information about breast prostheses (artificial breast forms), bras and clothes for women who have had surgery for breast cancer. Includes photographs, quotes from women, and details of suppliers.

Cover image of 'Breast screening. Helping you decide [Easy read]'

Breast screening. Helping you decide [Easy read] (2017)

NHS Health Scotland

This leaflet explains what breast screening is, who is offered screening, the benefits and disadvantages of screening, what happens before, during, and after screening, and what it means to be called back. Includes breast awareness advice. Concludes with answers to questions that women may ask.

Cover image of 'TLC. Touch. Look. Check.'

TLC. Touch. Look. Check. (November 2017)

Breast Cancer Now

Illustrated leaflet with information about breast changes.

Cover image of 'Docetaxel (Taxotere)'

Docetaxel (Taxotere) (November 2017)

Breast Cancer Care

This factsheet explains briefly what Taxotere® is, when it may be prescribed, how it works, the benefits, and possible side-effects.

Cover image of 'Paclitaxel (Taxol)'

Paclitaxel (Taxol) (November 2017)

Breast Cancer Care

This factsheet explains briefly what Taxol® is, when it may be prescribed, how it works, and the possible side-effects.

Cover image of 'Breast awareness and screening'

Breast awareness and screening (May 2017)

Action Cancer

This leaflet describes when and how to check the breasts for changes and what to look for. It briefly explains what a mammogram is. Contains information on local services and describes the work of Action Cancer in Northern Ireland.

Cover image of 'Breast care and self examination'

Breast care and self examination (December 2017)

Women's Health Concern

This factsheet has been designed to help women understand more about their breasts and describes regular self-examination, the breast awareness five point code, breast pain, and nipple changes. It also has brief information on breast lumps, breast cancer, and breast screening.

Cover image of 'TLC. Touch. Look. Check.'

TLC. Touch. Look. Check. (November 2017)

Breast Cancer Now

Illustrated credit-card-sized mini-leaflet with information about breast changes.

Cover image of 'Looking after your breasts. Information for women'

Looking after your breasts. Information for women (November 2017)

Cheshire and Wirral Partnership NHS Foundation Trust

Easy read information for women on how to check their breasts.

Cover image of 'Welcome to the Pink Ladies Club. Fighting breast cancer and finding friends'

Welcome to the Pink Ladies Club. Fighting breast cancer and finding friends (2017)

Independently published

Karen Bates was diagnosed with breast cancer after a routine screening. In this frank and heartfelt memoir, she shares her story and tips for surviving breast cancer, chemotherapy and reconstruction surgery. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Breast screening for women over 70 [Welsh]'

Breast screening for women over 70 [Welsh] (August 2017)

Breast Test Wales

Key messages about breast screening for women over the age of 70.

Cover image of 'Breast screening for women over 70'

Breast screening for women over 70 (August 2017)

Breast Test Wales

Key messages about breast screening for women over the age of 70.

Cover image of 'The essential guide to breast cancer'

The essential guide to breast cancer (2017)

Need2Know

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in the UK; there are approximately 45,000 new cases every year. A new diagnosis can be very frightening and many people will have no prior knowledge of the disease. This book is for women and their families who are looking for a comprehensive but plain language guide to breast cancer and its treatments. Many people find that doctors, although highly qualified and well meaning, can forget how little the layperson knows about medical procedures and terminology. Starting with the basics, this guide will look at what breast cancer is and how it’s diagnosed, right through to support options, the treatment available and how to care for your carers. The emotional after-effects of being a survivor are also covered in detail. Written by a survivor of breast cancer and peer reviewed by a breast cancer specialist, this book will provide everything women need to know about breast care, being diagnosed with breast cancer and the road to recovery. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Chemo summer. An uplifting breast cancer experience'

Chemo summer. An uplifting breast cancer experience (2017)

Austin Macauley

In Chemo Summer Jane Hoggar takes the reader through a light-hearted and informative account of her discovery of breast cancer and its cure. Cancer of any description has the capacity to chill those it affects and their loved ones. But for Jane Hoggar early discovery and diagnosis provided for a satisfactory resolution. And it's these small details that might well help people in a similar situation. For example, Jane did not discover a lump, which is the usual thing in breast cancer, but a sag' when she raised her arms and it was her insistence that something was wrong that resulted in a vital early medical diagnosis. All the side issues are covered in the book, effects of chemo and radiotherapy, hair loss and wigs, changes in diet and exercise, making Chemo Summer a valuable and engaging look into a serious and often frightening subject. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Run for your life. How one woman ran circles around breast cancer'

Run for your life. How one woman ran circles around breast cancer (2017)

Pitch Publishing Ltd

Running has been many things to Jenny Baker – a space to achieve new things, a way to keep fit and healthy, and a source of friendship and community. She had planned a year of running to celebrate her birthday; instead Jenny was hit with a bombshell which rocked her life when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. She had one question for her oncologist: can I keep running? It gave her a sense of identity through her chemotherapy, while her treatment was stripping away everything that was important to her. Run for Your Life is the story of how she kept running to help her beat cancer, and how it helped her get her life back on track after an intensive spell of treatment and a turbulent time in her life. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Storm in a D cup! One woman’s journey through breast cancer'

Storm in a D cup! One woman’s journey through breast cancer (2017)

Debbie Paton Publishing

Storm in a D Cup! is a blow-by-blow account of Debbie Paton's journey through breast cancer. It is a candid account of the year between her initial diagnosis and her full recovery. When she was first diagnosed, Debbie wrote notes in a diary, but her daughter Georgia dragged her into the 21st century by convincing her to write a blog that could be shared with a wider audience. The blog soon became Debbie's cathartic writing. It gave her the freedom to express the rollercoaster of emotions as they happened, the good, the bad and the irrational. She shared her entries on social media for her friends and family to follow – it took the pressure off endless update phone calls! This is a no holds barred account of the mix of emotions, the highs and lows of the journey. It is not about doom and gloom, but rather the realities of the journey and the experiences Debbie had along the way. It is at times poignant and highly sensitive, at others, filled with laughter and fun. It was a year that shaped her life into something different. It is Debbie’s hope that her experiences can help others by alleviating some of the fear surrounding a breast cancer diagnosis. If she could have read a similar blog before starting her own journey, Debbie feels certain she would’ve been far less fearful of what lay ahead. Yes, everyone's path is different, but there are elements of her experience that will resonate with others in the same position. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Trastuzumab (Herceptin®) [Portuguese]'

Trastuzumab (Herceptin®) [Portuguese] (May 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Trastuzumab (Herceptin®) may be used to treat breast cancer and stomach cancer. It may also be used to treat other cancers as part of a research trial. This factsheet explains how it works, how it is given, and possible side-effects.

Cover image of 'FEC chemotherapy [Portuguese]'

FEC chemotherapy [Portuguese] (September 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

FEC is a combination chemotherapy treatment for breast cancer. This factsheet describes the drugs, how they are given and some of the possible side-effects.

Cover image of 'FEC chemotherapy [Arabic]'

FEC chemotherapy [Arabic] (2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

FEC is a combination chemotherapy treatment for breast cancer. This factsheet describes the drugs, how they are given and some of the possible side-effects.

Cover image of 'EC chemotherapy [Latvian]'

EC chemotherapy [Latvian] (2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

The EC chemotherapy regime (epirubicin and cyclophosphamide) is used to treat breast cancer. This factsheet describes how this combination is given and the possible side-effects.

Cover image of 'FEC-T chemotherapy [Romanian]'

FEC-T chemotherapy [Romanian] (September 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This information describes the FEC-T chemotherapy regimen, which is used to treat breast cancer. It describes the drugs used, how treatment is given, and some of the possible side-effects.

Cover image of 'FEC-T chemotherapy [Polish]'

FEC-T chemotherapy [Polish] (2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This information describes the FEC-T chemotherapy regimen, which is used to treat breast cancer. It describes the drugs used, how treatment is given, and some of the possible side-effects.

Cover image of 'Paclitaxel [Arabic]'

Paclitaxel [Arabic] (October 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Paclitaxel is most commonly used to treat breast, ovarian and non-small-cell lung cancer. This factsheet describes how it is given and the possible side-effects.

Cover image of 'Paclitaxel [French]'

Paclitaxel [French] (October 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Paclitaxel is most commonly used to treat breast, ovarian and non-small-cell lung cancer. This factsheet describes how it is given and the possible side-effects.

Cover image of 'Paclitaxel [Portuguese]'

Paclitaxel [Portuguese] (October 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Paclitaxel is most commonly used to treat breast, ovarian and non-small-cell lung cancer. This factsheet describes how it is given and the possible side-effects.

Cover image of 'Denosumab (Xgeva ®, Prolia ®) [Polish]'

Denosumab (Xgeva ®, Prolia ®) [Polish] (July 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Denosumab is a targeted therapy used to treat secondary bone cancer. It is also given to people with certain cancers (breast cancer, prostate cancer) to strengthen their bones. This factsheet describes what denosumab is, how it works, how it is given, and the possible side effects.

Cover image of 'The breast reconstruction guidebook'

The breast reconstruction guidebook (2017)

Johns Hopkins University Press

For a decade The Breast Reconstruction Guidebook has been the best resource on this topic for women who have had a mastectomy. Equal parts science and support, it is filled with stories that illustrate the emotional and physical components of breast reconstruction. Readers will find advice about choosing a doctor and a procedure, insurance and payment issues, how to prepare for surgery, and what to expect during recovery. Expert commentary by physicians and insights from patients inform this book, as does the exhaustive research by the author, a two-time breast cancer survivor who has twice had reconstructive surgery. New in this edition are discussions of: the pros and cons of saline and silicone implants; solutions for post-lumpectomy cosmetic problems; new immediate-delayed reconstruction when post-mastectomy radiation may be required; the benefits and limitations of nipple-sparing mastectomy; considerations for direct-to-implant reconstruction; newly developed tissue flap procedures; who can best apply nipple and areola tattoos and why tattoos may not last; enriching fat with stem cells so it stays in the breast; patient-controlled tissue expansion; how insurance and health care reform affect reconstruction. (Publisher)

Cover image of '#dearcancer: Things to help you through [Kindle]'

#dearcancer: Things to help you through [Kindle] (2017)

Trapeze (Orion)

When journalist and broadcaster Victoria Derbyshire was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2015, she made the decision to share her experiences in a series of video diaries to help demystify cancer treatment. Overwhelmed by the response, Victoria set up a Facebook page inviting people to share their tories, talk openly about cancer and support one another. The result is this collection of writing from cancer patients and their loved ones. Whether you have recently been diagnosed with cancer, or a friend or relative has, everyone who has contributed to this ebook has been through the same journey, and hopes you will take strength from these 'things to help you through'. From practical tips on managing your treatment and your everyday life with cancer, to advice on understanding and dealing with the emotional rollercoaster that begins with diagnosis, this free resource is packed with hard-won wisdom and insight, at once useful and poignant. This exclusive collection is published ahead of Victoria Derbyshire's book, Dear Cancer, Love Victoria: A Mum's Diary of Hope. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'All to live for. Fighting cancer. Finding hope.'

All to live for. Fighting cancer. Finding hope. (2017)

Headline

In 2005 Emma Hannigan was 32, happily married to her long-time love, with two young children. Her world was shattered when she discovered that she had the rare gene BRCA1, meaning a 50% chance of developing ovarian cancer and an 85% chance of breast cancer. To reduce the risk, Emma had a double mastectomy and both ovaries removed, but in 2007 received the news that cancer had struck anyway. Twelve years later, Emma is battling cancer for the tenth time. With warmth and wisdom, she shares her journey and her advice on everything from skincare and hair loss to how to keep a sense of humour through it all. All to Live For is a story of one woman's determination not to let cancer win; a story of strength and inspiration, hope and love. And of never giving up. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Dear cancer, love Victoria: a mum’s diary of hope'

Dear cancer, love Victoria: a mum’s diary of hope (2017)

Trapeze (Orion)

Renowned as a much-loved and highly respected BBC journalist, Victoria Derbyshire has spent 20 years finding the human story behind the headlines. In 2015 she found herself at the heart of the news, with a devastating breast cancer diagnosis. With honesty and openness, she decided to live out her treatment and recovery in the spotlight in a series of video diaries that encouraged thousands to seek diagnosis and help. Victoria has kept a diary since she was nine years old and in DEAR CANCER, LOVE VICTORIA she shares her day to day experiences of life following her diagnosis and coming to terms with a future that wasn't planned. From the moment she woke up to find her right breast had collapsed, to telling her partner and children, through to mastectomy and chemotherapy. From wearing a wig to work and hiding it from her colleagues, to the relief and joy of finishing treatment before immediately flying to Glasgow to present a debate on the European Referendum. By sharing her story, she became the person that mums, daughters, sisters, husbands, boyfriends and family members contacted to thank as they tried to find ways to cope with their own and their loved ones' prognosis, and needed to know that they were not alone. Victoria's story is an affecting and at times heart-breaking one but it is so often laugh-out-loud too. Moving, wonderfully heartwarming and ultimately uplifting, this is a powerful account of a brave struggle told with honesty, courage and emotion that gives strength to anyone touched by cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The bright hour. A memoir of living and dying'

The bright hour. A memoir of living and dying (2017)

The Text Publishing Company (UK) Ltd

In January 2015 Nina was diagnosed with breast cancer, and it metastasised later that year. She was thirty-eight years old; her mother had died only a few months earlier from multiple myeloma. Nina Riggs grew up in a contemplative family: her great-great-great-grandfather was Ralph Waldo Emerson, and she was raised to turn to his essays for 'guidance, inspiration, and something to push against'. THE BRIGHT HOUR is Nina's intimate, unflinching account of 'living with death in the room'. She tells her story in a series of absurd, poignant and often hilarious vignettes drawn from a life that has 'no real future or arc left to it, yet still goes on as if it does'. This unforgettable memoir leads the reader into the innermost chambers of the writer's life: into the mind and heart, the work and home and family, of a young woman alternately seeking to make peace with and raging against the reality of her approaching death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Information for trans people. NHS Screening Programmes'

Information for trans people. NHS Screening Programmes (July 2017)

Public Health England

This leaflet is for trans (transgender) and non-binary people in England. It tells you about the adult NHS screening programmes that are available in England and explains who we invite for screening.

Cover image of 'The owl at the window. A memoir of loss and hope'

The owl at the window. A memoir of loss and hope (2017)

Coronet (Hodder & Stoughton)

Award-winning TV comedy writer Carl Gorham's account of his bereavement is by turns deeply moving and darkly humorous. Part love story, part widower's diary, part tales of single parenting, it tells of his wife's cancer, her premature death and his attempts to rebuild his life afterwards with his six -year old daughter. Realised in a series of vivid snapshots, it takes the reader on an extraordinary journey from Oxford to Australia, from Norfolk to Hong Kong through fear, despair, pain and anger to hope, laughter and renewal. The Owl at the Window is a fresh and original exploration of what it means to lose a partner in your forties, and how Carl learned to live again. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A most clarifying battle: the spirit and cancer'

A most clarifying battle: the spirit and cancer (2017)

O-Books (John Hunt Publishing)

Part resource and part memoir, this is the work of an extraordinarily courageous and shining figure who finished her manuscript before her illness finally claimed her. A Most Clarifying Battle provides a foundation for the reader to understand the experiential issues involved in living and dying with a cancer diagnosis and suggests simple exercises that can be used to build spiritual muscle and enhance quality of life. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Hug everyone you know: a year of community, courage, and cancer'

Hug everyone you know: a year of community, courage, and cancer (2017)

She Writes Press

Antoinette Martin believed herself to be a healthy and sturdy woman--that is, until she received a Stage 1 breast cancer diagnosis. Cancer is scary enough for the brave, but for a wimp like Martin, it was downright terrifying. Martin had to swallow waves of nausea at the thought of her body being poisoned, and frequently fainted during blood draws and infusions. To add to her terror, cancer suddenly seemed to be all around her. In the months following her diagnosis, a colleague succumbed to cancer, and five of her friends were also diagnosed. Though tempted, Martin knew she could not hide in bed for ten months. She had a devoted husband, daughters, and a tribe of friends and relations. Along with work responsibilities, there were graduations, anniversaries, and roller derby bouts to attend, not to mention a house to sell and a summer of beach-bumming to enjoy. In order to harness support without scaring herself or anyone else, she journaled her experiences and began to e-mail the people who loved her--the people she called My Everyone. She kept them informed and reminded all to 'hug everyone you know' at every opportunity. Reading the responses became her calming strategy. Ultimately, with the help of her community, Martin found the courage within herself to face cancer with perseverance and humor. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Dolly daydreamer'

Dolly daydreamer (2017)

Austin Macauley

Rachel and Simon have been married for a long time. They are both parents and grandparents. They love Portugal, but life isn’t as perfect as it appears on the surface. Rachel had breast cancer and as time goes on, family circumstances threaten the very fabric of the family. Is their family unit strong enough to survive what the future has in store for Rachel, Simon and the rest of their family? (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Having a bad hair day'

Having a bad hair day (2017)

Clare C Davison

“Tomorrow, you will feel a little bit better.” From a loving childhood, belonging to a large family with no history of breast cancer, Clare was alarmed at age 42 to accidentally discover she had the disease. As a self-employed single mum, Clare documents her memoirs of personal experience and knowledge of the cruel decisions made for the aggressive treatments and hair loss ahead. With an inner strength of humour, Clare’s first book includes her lunch arrangements with Peter Andre, a cake nationally released in her honour, an experience of public speaking, media attention and continued fundraising with a moving excerpt from her son. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Mummy’s got a poorly'

Mummy’s got a poorly (2017)

Sarah West

Mummy’s Got a Poorly is an engaging, thought-provoking story, told through the eyes of a five-year-old girl whose mummy is unwell. It is aimed at the young children of parents with a serious illness to support them through a difficult time. Whilst not mentioning the ‘C’ word it does cover the effects that medicine such as chemotherapy can have and also provides lots of opportunities for children to ask questions and discuss their feelings about their own parent’s illness. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Cancer hates kisses'

Cancer hates kisses (2017)

Dial Books for Young Readers

Author Jessica Reid Sliwerski was diagnosed with breast cancer four months after giving birth to her daughter. And through all the stages of treatment--surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, losing her hair--she thought about how hard it would be to talk to your child about cancer while coping with it. She wrote this picture book to give other parents and their children an encouraging tool for having those conversations--a lovingly upbeat book that is also refreshingly authentic and straightforward. With its simple text and heartwarming illustrations, Cancer Hates Kisses is relatable to any type of cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Well. A doctor's journey through fear to freedom'

Well. A doctor's journey through fear to freedom (2017)

Saraband

When Dr Mary Gunn was diagnosed with cancer, her first reaction was fear, and to fight the disease aggressively for the sake of not only herself but her young children and husband. But when it came back – and turned out to be incurable – she knew that she couldn’t live the rest of her life in fear. Mary embraced a new approach to life: to accept all the joy and sorrow, safety and danger, certainty and unpredictability… in essence, to live freely. In our uncertain times, when it’s difficult not to feel the fear, Dr Mary Gunn’s remarkable memoir offers mindfulness tools for resilience, and shows how we can all use acceptance, compassion and love to live courageously, magnificently. Backed up by many years of experience as both a doctor and a patient, her story will inspire you to let go of fear, love life and live well. (Publisher)

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