Publications directory

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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 203

Cover image of 'Living with hormone therapy. A guide for men with prostate cancer'

Living with hormone therapy. A guide for men with prostate cancer (June 2019)

Prostate Cancer UK

This booklet is for men who are having hormone therapy. It describes the different types of hormone therapy, how they work and what the treatment involves. It also includes information about the possible side-effects and how to manage them.

Cover image of 'Bereavement. Coping with the death of a loved one'

Bereavement. Coping with the death of a loved one (November 2019)

Age UK

This guide aims to give those recently bereaved some idea about the range of experiences many people go through.

Cover image of 'Living with lung cancer'

Living with lung cancer (February 2019)

Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation

This booklet was written with the help of lung cancer experts, people affected by lung cancer, and others who support people with lung cancer to help you make the most of your health and wellbeing. 

Cover image of 'Supporting your grandchild and family. An information guide for grandparents of a child or young person diagnosed with cancer'

Supporting your grandchild and family. An information guide for grandparents of a child or young person diagnosed with cancer (April 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Being told your grandchild has cancer comes as a terrible shock. Most grandparents worry not only about their grandchild, but also about how their own son/daughter will cope. Many are also concerned about the effects a cancer diagnosis will have on other children within the family, how they can support their family and how, as grandparents, they themselves will cope. Sometimes, it is not as easy for grandparents to access information first hand and this can lead to feelings of isolation. This guide answers some of the many questions grandparents might have during diagnosis and treatment.

Cover image of 'Stem cell transplant. A guide to donor (allogeneic) stem cell transplantation for teenagers and young adults'

Stem cell transplant. A guide to donor (allogeneic) stem cell transplantation for teenagers and young adults (February 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This guide describes stem cells and explains what a stem cell transplantation is, why it might be necessary, and the different types of transplants. It also describes the process of finding a donor, the pre-transplant operation, the transplant team, what to bring to hospital, preparing to receive a bone marrow transplant, what happens during the transplant and afterwards, the side-effects, getting ready to go home and getting back to normal. Includes details of useful organisations and a glossary.

Cover image of 'I have finished my treatment. What happens next'

I have finished my treatment. What happens next (November 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This booklet for children and teenagers aged 10-16 aims to help answer questions and concerns that arise when treatment for cancer finishes. It covers feelings and emotions, coping with worry, coping with family and friends, school and college, healthy living, and practical issues such as what happens at follow-up, medicines, and what to look out for.

Cover image of 'When your brother or sister has cancer. An information guide for teenagers and young adults whose sibling is diagnosed with cancer'

When your brother or sister has cancer. An information guide for teenagers and young adults whose sibling is diagnosed with cancer (November 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Being told that your brother or sister has cancer can be overwhelming and you may be full of questions. It is a difficult time for everyone in your family as life is turned upside down almost overnight. You will likely feel many different emotions as you try and come to terms with what your sibling’s diagnosis means for you and your family. You may feel worried or upset at this sudden change that you didn’t want or ask for, and you may desperately want everything to go back to normal as it was before their diagnosis. Life can seem very unfair. These feelings are completely normal and you are not alone. This guide covers how your brother or sister’s diagnosis might affect you, your feelings and emotions, and how it is important to take care of yourself during this difficult time. It explains more about cancer, and what you can expect over the coming weeks and months.

Cover image of 'Exercises after breast cancer surgery'

Exercises after breast cancer surgery (April 2019)

Breast Cancer Care

This leaflet explains why exercise is necessary after breast surgery, when to start exercising, and how long to carry on. It opens out into a poster that demonstrates exercises for the days and weeks after surgery.

Cover image of 'Being cared for at home'

Being cared for at home (July 2019)

Marie Curie

This booklet is for people living with a terminal illness, and their family and friends. Inside you’ll find information about the care and support that’s available for you at home. 

Cover image of 'Prostate cancer. A guide for men who've just been diagnosed'

Prostate cancer. A guide for men who've just been diagnosed (May 2019)

Prostate Cancer UK

This booklet is for men who have been recently diagnosed with prostate cancer. It describes the prostate, how prostate cancer is diagnosed, what the test results mean, the treatment options, and the support available. It has space to record contact details and other information that may be useful, such as appointment times and PSA levels.

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