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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 192

Cover image of 'I’m just a person. My year of death, cancer and epiphany'

I’m just a person. My year of death, cancer and epiphany (2016)

Bluebird (Pan Macmillan)

In the span of four months in 2012, Tig Notaro was hospitalized for a debilitating intestinal disease called C. diff, her mother unexpectedly died, she went through a breakup, and then she was diagnosed with bilateral breast cancer. Hit with this devastating barrage, Tig took her grief onstage. Days after receiving her cancer diagnosis, she broke new comedic ground, opening an unvarnished set with the words: 'Good evening. Hello. I have cancer. How are you? Hi, how are you? Is everybody having a good time? I have cancer.' The set instantly went viral, and was ultimately released as Tig's sophomore album, Live, which sold one hundred thousand units in just six weeks and was later nominated for a Grammy. Now, the wildly popular star takes stock of that no good, very bad year - a difficult yet astonishing period in which tragedy turned into absurdity and despair transformed into joy. An inspired combination of the deadpan silliness of her comedy and the open-hearted vulnerability that has emerged in the wake of that dire time, I'm Just a Person is a moving and often hilarious look at this very brave, very funny woman's journey into the darkness and her thrilling return from it. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'What doesn’t kill you, makes you stronger'

What doesn’t kill you, makes you stronger (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

“You’ve got cancer” – three little words that can change your life. “What Doesn’t Kill You, Makes You Stronger” is the honest, straight-from-the-heart account of one woman’s experience of hearing these three words. Right from the start, it follows every step of this journey – and it IS a journey – the tears and laughter, the ups and downs and everything in between. There is loads of information available that give you the facts about what it’s like to be diagnosed with cancer, what happens next, what the options are for treatment and a how to have a life alongside a cancer diagnosis. Most of these are written by those who have never had cancer. Not many of them share the emotional and psychological effects that being diagnosed have. This book does. It talks about the real side effects of chemo, the strange things you crave or can’t stand, the powerful friendships that develop and the fierce spirit within, which is determined to beat cancer. It’s not a “poor me” story……it’s a frank and honest account that has one purpose – to help other people who find themselves with a cancer diagnosis, to show them that what they are thinking and feeling is “OK”, that they aren’t alone and that it’s ok to have a laugh. “What Doesn’t Kill You, Makes You Stronger” – very frank, very honest and very true. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The pink unicorns of male breast cancer'

The pink unicorns of male breast cancer (2016)

Blossom Spring Publishing

Alan Herbert is a West London born, ex forces, motorcycle riding, all action grandfather who now lives in The Netherlands with his family. In 2012, he was diagnosed with breast cancer. Alan vividly describes his battle with cancer and the often absurd situations he finds himself in as he fights not only the killer disease, but also the ignorance borne out of the feminization of breast cancer. Follow Alan’s courageous story that shows not only the determination, but the admirable spirit of a man who battled and survived. An inspirational, gripping, and down-to-earth story written from a man’s point of view in dealing with breast cancer. “Men have breasts too!” (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'In gratitude'

In gratitude (2016)

Bloomsbury Publishing

The future flashed before my eyes in all its pre-ordained banality. Embarrassment, at first, to the exclusion of all other feelings. But embarrassment curled at the edges with a weariness. I got a joke in. 'So - we'd better get cooking the meth,' I said to the Poet. In August 2014, Jenny Diski was diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer and given 'two or three years' to live. She didn't know how to react. All responses felt scripted, laden with cliché. Being a writer, she decided to write about it (grappling with the unoriginality even of this), and also to tell a story she has not yet told: that of being taken in, aged fifteen, by the author Doris Lessing, and the subsequent fifty years of their complex relationship. In September 2014 Jenny Diski began writing in the London Review of Books, describing her experience of living with terminal cancer, examining her life and history with Doris Lessing: the fairy-tale rescue from 'the bin' as a teenager, the difficulties of being absorbed into an unfamiliar family and the influence this had on her. Swooping from one memory to the next - alighting on the hysterical battlefield of her parental home, her expulsion from school, stacking shelves in Banbury and the drug-taking twenty-something in and out of psychiatric hospitals, Diski paints a portrait of two extraordinary writers - Lessing and herself. From one of our most original voices comes a book like no other: a cerebral, witty, dazzlingly candid masterpiece about an uneasy relationship; about memory and writing, ingratitude and anger; about living with illness and facing death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Dying. A memoir'

Dying. A memoir (2016)

Canongate Books Ltd

At the age of sixty, Cory Taylor was dying of melanoma-related brain cancer. With her illness no longer treatable, she began at the start of 2016 to write about her experiences and, in an extraordinary creative surge, wrote what would become Dying: A Memoir. This is a brief and clear-eyed account of what dying taught Cory: amid the tangle of her feelings, she reflects on the patterns of her life, and remembers the lives and deaths of her parents. She tells us why she would like to be able to choose the circumstances of her own death. Dying is about the vulnerability and strength, courage and humility, anger and acceptance that it takes to live a good life and say goodbye to it in peace. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'They said I had six months to live. Surviving prostate cancer – 10 years on'

They said I had six months to live. Surviving prostate cancer – 10 years on (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

There are few things in life as shocking as finding out that you are about to die. We all know, of course, that this is an inevitable part of living but we put it out of mind. Yes life will end, but not today, not any time soon. Coming face to face with the reality that it could indeed be sometime soon is just one part of being diagnosed with terminal cancer. There are other things too - coping with treatment, coping with the side effects of treatment, dealing with the reactions of loved ones. Then there is the constant uncertainty of the next blood test, and the difficulty of getting on with everyday life, fearful of what the future might bring. However, the crunch is that this is a terminal illness which can only end one way. This is the story of how I dealt with that... (Publisher)

Cover image of 'When breath becomes air'

When breath becomes air (2016)

The Bodley Head

At the age of thirty-six, on the verge of completing a decade’s worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, and the next he was a patient struggling to live. And just like that, the future he and his wife had imagined evaporated. When Breath Becomes Air chronicles Kalanithi’s transformation from a naïve medical student “possessed,” as he wrote, “by the question of what, given that all organisms die, makes a virtuous and meaningful life” into a neurosurgeon at Stanford working in the brain, the most critical place for human identity, and finally into a patient and new father confronting his own mortality. What makes life worth living in the face of death? What do you do when the future, no longer a ladder toward your goals in life, flattens out into a perpetual present? What does it mean to have a child, to nurture a new life as another fades away? These are some of the questions Kalanithi wrestles with in this profoundly moving, exquisitely observed memoir. Paul Kalanithi died in March 2015, while working on this book, yet his words live on as a guide and a gift to us all. “I began to realize that coming face to face with my own mortality, in a sense, had changed nothing and everything,” he wrote. “Seven words from Samuel Beckett began to repeat in my head: ‘I can’t go on. I’ll go on.’” When Breath Becomes Air is an unforgettable, life-affirming reflection on the challenge of facing death and on the relationship between doctor and patient, from a brilliant writer who became both. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'I am here. Stories from a cancer ward'

I am here. Stories from a cancer ward (2016)

Scribe Publications

Looking for more meaning in his work, Johannes Klabbers gave up a tenured academic position to spend his days caring for the sick and dying. He trained as a secular pastoral carer in a cancer hospital, and from the patients there he learned how simply talking and listening can provide comfort: from chatting about the football to discussing life’s meaning and how one prepares for death. I Am Here is a frank, moving, and sometimes funny record of his encounters. It gives an unforgettable insight into the variety of ways people cope with suffering, and suggests how we can support them — through caring, through conversation, and by acknowledging that although we may not be able to answer all of life’s questions, we can face them together. From one of the saddest places comes this powerful affirmation of our capacity for humane care. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Marrow. A love story'

Marrow. A love story (2016)

Harper Wave (HarperCollins imprint)

The author of the New York Times bestseller Broken Open returns with a visceral and profound memoir of two sisters who, in the face of a bone marrow transplant—one the donor and one the recipient—begin a quest for acceptance, authenticity, and most of all, love. A mesmerizing and courageous memoir: the story of two sisters uncovering the depth of their love through the life-and-death experience of a bone marrow transplant. Throughout her life, Elizabeth Lesser has sought understanding about what it means to be true to oneself and, at the same time, truly connected to the ones we love. But when her sister Maggie needs a bone marrow transplant to save her life, and Lesser learns that she is the perfect match, she faces a far more immediate and complex question about what it really means to love—honestly, generously, and authentically. Hoping to give Maggie the best chance possible for a successful transplant, the sisters dig deep into the marrow of their relationship to clear a path to unconditional acceptance. They leave the bone marrow transplant up to the doctors, but take on what Lesser calls a "soul marrow transplant," examining their family history, having difficult conversations, examining old assumptions, and offering forgiveness until all that is left is love for each other’s true selves. Their process—before, during, and after the transplant—encourages them to take risks of authenticity in other aspects their lives. But life does not follow the storylines we plan for it. Maggie’s body is ultimately too weak to fight the relentless illness. As she and Lesser prepare for the inevitable, they grow ever closer as their shared blood cells become a symbol of the enduring bond they share. Told with suspense and humor, Marrow is joyous and heartbreaking, incandescent and profound. The story reveals how even our most difficult experiences can offer unexpected spiritual growth. Reflecting on the multifaceted nature of love—love of other, love of self, love of the world—Marrow is an unflinching and beautiful memoir about getting to the very center of ourselves. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Tea & chemo. Fighting cancer, living life'

Tea & chemo. Fighting cancer, living life (2015)

Urbane Publications Limited

At the age of 45, wife and mother Jackie Buxton was diagnosed with breast cancer. Lurching between the crippling fear that the cancer had spread, and the great comfort of knowing she was one of the lucky ones who could be treated, she did what she always does when life presents her with a challenge: she wrote it down. Jackie quickly realised that even with cancer, life was far from bad. Never known for her scientific prowess, she nonetheless became a 'bit of an expert' - at least in the field of hair loss, water retention and biscuits - and decided to use her writing to share experiences and help others recognise you don't have to be defined by your cancer. Tea & Chemo is full of laughter, tears, honesty and hope, and offers inspirational words to everyone facing the life challenges that cancer inevitably brings. All proceeds from the sales of Tea & Chemo will go to three incredibly important charities, whose compassionate care and professionalism make the difference to so many lives: The Haven, Breast Cancer Now and The Robert Ogden Macmillan Centre, Harrogate. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Swimming with the tide'

Swimming with the tide (2015)

Stourcastle Books

I wanted to write this book to share my experience of dealing with a challenge that many women face. It's not dark, it's not gloomy. It's not filled with photos that will make you weep. I've tried to capture my emotions at the time, including the humour. Every diagnosis is different, every account is different. This is mine. All royalties paid to me by Amazon are being donated to Macmillan Cancer Support. (Author) 

Cover image of 'Invincibility in the face of prostate cancer: coming out the other side'

Invincibility in the face of prostate cancer: coming out the other side (2015)

The Cloister House Press

Throughout his extensive career Alfred Samuels was a bodyguard to some the world's most recognised celebrities. He was a physically active and mentally alert individual who provided the needs of his particular industry over many years. In January 2012 his world came to a sudden and unforeseeable halt when he was diagnosed with advanced metastatic prostate cancer, stage four. Alfred Samuels’ honest and frank account is one part of his mission to challenge men's attitudes and the taboo surrounding prostate cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Gifted by grief. A true story of cancer, loss and rebirth'

Gifted by grief. A true story of cancer, loss and rebirth (2015)

Living Well Publications

Is it really possible to be grateful for your husband’s death? This is the message that ultimately comes over in Jane Duncan Rogers’ book Gifted By Grief: A True Story of Cancer, Loss and Rebirth. Told through the medium of blog posts by her husband in his last year, her own journal entries, and a heartfelt, poignant and riveting narrative, Jane invites the reader into her grief-stricken world. Where this might be harrowing, it is found to be ironic; where there might be pointlessness and despair, gifts are found, inspiring the reader find the gifts in their own life situation. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The inflatable woman'

The inflatable woman (2015)

Bloomsbury Publishing

Iris (or balletgirl-42 as she's known on the internet dating circuit) is a zookeeper looking for love when she is diagnosed with breast cancer. Overnight, her life becomes populated with a carnival of daunting hospital characters. Despite the attempts of her friends – Maud, Granma Suggs, Larry the Monkey and a group of singing penguins – to comfort her, Iris's fears begin to encircle her until all she has to cling to is the attention of a lighthouse keeper called sailor_buoy_39. The Inflatable Woman combines magic realism with the grit of everyday life to create a poignant and surreal journey inside the human psyche. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Flying free. Powerful journeys of those who dare to live'

Flying free. Powerful journeys of those who dare to live (2015)

Self-published using Grosvenor House Publishing

Experiencing an incredibly uplifting, thriving face of this disease – a face that does NOT come across in the media, Jacinta brings you the inspirited personal journeys of those who DARE to LIVE magnificently showing the limitless power of the human spirit and the indescribable love of God. This is the beginning! "Cancer has opened up the world for me and given me life. I have made choices I never thought I would, held beliefs I didn't know I had, turned inside out and didn't know I could! Being in the same boat calls me to write Flying Free from the inside, as it were. This feels effortless, fearless, limitless and fulfilling, all at the same time". (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Pear shaped'

Pear shaped (2015)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Adam is a 44-year-old London lawyer and father of three. Completely out of the blue, and for no reason other than sheer dumb chance, he was diagnosed with a rare and aggressive brain tumour. Adam has endured radiotherapy and chemotherapy which were preceded by major brain surgery to remove the tumour - helpfully described by his surgeon as being the size and shape of a pear. Using the blackest of humour, this book charts Adam's journey from normality to having a disease regularly described as a “death sentence”. How will he cope with the treatment? How will his relationship with family and friends be affected? Most important of all, how will his hair come through this? Quite simply, it is the funniest book so far this year about brain cancer. Warning - this book is intended for mature audiences due to the subject matter and use of strong language. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Because you were there'

Because you were there (2015)

Austin Macauley

'The grief I feel now seems to have unlocked so many grieves and insecurities from the past I thought I'd long overcome. I feel so small without you; my heart feels totally lost.' On August 18th 2013, phones buzzed, babies were born, and families enjoyed a Sunday day out. But Sally Dalzel's world fell apart. Her husband of 26 years passed away and she plunged into loneliness and isolation. In private letters to her husband, Sally documented her journey from mourning back to love, acceptance, and joy. She hopes that by publishing her letters, she will provide support to others struggling with the grieving process. It may be of help to those traversing the first few months when they wonder if this is how it will always feel, or for training purposes as it is written from first-hand experience, rather than by a professional. (Author)

Cover image of 'Unplanned journey'

Unplanned journey (2015)

Matador

Unplanned Journey is a breast cancer diary with candid and beautifully observed photography by award-winning photographer, Bella West. It shows the 18-month period in the life of a middle-aged woman, Tiggy Walker (who happens to be married to BBC Radio 2's Johnnie Walker), undergoing her breast cancer treatment and reconstruction. What seemed a cruel sentence ends up with Tiggy having neater breasts than she could ever have hoped for, and a renewed outlook on her life. The journey may have been unplanned, but it is the most important one she has taken. Tiggy does not hold back in this book; she openly discusses the challenges she faced, her hatred of chemo and her relationship with Johnnie. She bravely exposes her voluptuous body for the photos, as she documents what physical changes occur. This book is essential reading for anyone who has been through cancer - as a patient or a carer - and for anyone about to go through treatment for breast cancer. Royalties from the book will be going to Carers UK. (Publisher)

Cover image of '5 months, 10 years, 2 hours'

5 months, 10 years, 2 hours (2015)

Outpost19

When a disillusioned New York attorney decides to leave the law, buy a lipstick-red convertible, and hit the road, she doesn't expect to wake up in a hospital room with a malignant brain tumor and a prognosis of one year to live. Or that ten years later, she'll be competing in a grueling triathlon. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A life turned upside down'

A life turned upside down (2015)

Little Knoll Press

The story of young mum, Nikki Hastings, who went to her doctor with a painful hip and several days later was given a diagnosis of terminal cancer with only months to live. Due to her willingness to try new treatments and determination to make the best of her remaining time, Nikki’s life was extended by years. This is her story. The author’s royalty and all profit from sales of this book will be donated to Lewis-Manning Hospice. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cancer determination and me'

Cancer determination and me (2015)

Self-published using AuthorHouse

The author was once an all round sportsman keeping fit and healthy until one day he was diagnosed with a brain tumour. This book is about what he had and what he has been through and how he came out fighting and mainly how motivated he was. How he used to just try to get up and do things in this book are all his feelings of what he has been through. It is strange because his life and his perspective on life have changed dramatically since he was diagnosed with a brain tumour. He has missed a lot of school and study time because of the intense and lengthy treatment he received. He had to Re-learn basic skills, especially basic physical skills that most people take for granted, such as writing, walking and other every day activities. He believes that this experience has made him a more determined and motivated person. He had to work very hard to get his life back but he never complained or gives in. The words that got him through everything where 'No pain no gain' and he will look forward to using his inner strength as he go forward in life. He wants to pass this book around the world for people to understand that no matter how hard life is or how hard you fight to beat an illness. If you want something that bad YOU CAN DO IT... (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Bald is better with earrings. A survivor’s guide to getting through breast cancer'

Bald is better with earrings. A survivor’s guide to getting through breast cancer (2015)

HarperCollins

When Andrea Hutton was diagnosed with breast cancer, she wanted to know everything. She voraciously read books, articles, and websites and talked to everyone she knew. But nothing prepared her for what the surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation would feel like. Were there tricks that could ease her pain and discomfort? What was “fatigue” and how would it affect her? At what exact moment would her hair fall out and how? Hutton wanted what she could not find: a clear how-to guide for the cancer girl she had become. Bald Is Better with Earrings is Hutton’s answer for women diagnosed with breast cancer: a straightforward handbook, leavened with humor and inspiration, to shepherd them though the experience. Warm and down-to-earth, Hutton explains what to expect and walks you through this intense and emotional process: tests, surgery, chemo, losing your hair and shaving your head, being bald, radiation treatments. Hutton offers a wealth of invaluable advice—from tricks for surviving chemo, to treating your skin during radiation, to keeping track of meds—and includes a practical list of tips for each stage of the process at the end of every chapter. Compassionate, friendly, and shaped by Hutton’s first-hand knowledge, Bald Is Better with Earrings is the comprehensive, essential companion for anyone dealing with breast cancer. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Brain tumours for dummys'

Brain tumours for dummys (2015)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Thinking nothing of an epileptic seizure, my carefree and single-thinking lifestyle continued as usual. That was until the results of the scan. A brain tumour stopped me in my tracks. Suddenly I had to rely on others. Moving out of my crime-ridden area was supposed to be a positive move towards recovery following the most mind bending experience of "awake" brain surgery. But Sarah and I couldn't have been more wrong. Our new home was in the flat beneath the neighbours from hell. Radiotherapy may have been easy if it hadn’t been for the scum determined to make our lives a misery, sending me to the brink of despair. With a lifestyle that featured an unhealthy amount of alcohol and facing up to my addictions and self-loathing, the early grave was looking more likely than the millionaire life I dreamed of. Getting back to work and experiencing new cultures helped to put me back on track. Rather than dwell on my own self-pity I drew inspiration from the world and people around me until finally I'd gotten hold of a normal life. A normal life that didn't last long. The townships in Africa, the petrol bombings, murders and car crashes that I'd witnessed in such a small space of time; none of them came close to the next chapter in my life. Finding out I would be a dad was one thing, but triplets? The path forward from there on in would prove to be chaotic but truly magical. The joys of a becoming a triplet father from that astonishing moment of the baby scan through to the events of the birth and beyond, coupled with the devastating deaths of good friends taught me the true meaning of life. But all that was the easy bit… (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'My cancer journey. A rendezvous with myself'

My cancer journey. A rendezvous with myself (2015)

Balboa Press

My book is a candid narration of my encounter with breast cancer. It is the story of an ordinary woman who was put in extraordinary circumstances, and who undertook her cancer journey with the utmost courage. This memoir is not just about describing a difficult medical condition. It is about going through the experience, and emerging from it wiser and stronger. It is about using cancer as a life changing experience, despite all the trauma and the loss – and the change needn’t be for the worse. It is about understanding the choice that a human being has – the choice to accept what cannot be changed, and to use one of the toughest fights of life to evolve into a better person, irrespective of the prognosis. Pick up a copy to embark on a rendezvous with your inner self! (Author)

Cover image of 'From both ends of the stethoscope. Getting through breast cancer – by a doctor who knows'

From both ends of the stethoscope. Getting through breast cancer – by a doctor who knows (2015)

Faito Books

Whilst dealing with her own breast cancer, Dr Kathleen Thompson recognised the desperate need for a 'going through breast cancer' guide. Her experiences make a fascinating story in themselves, and Kathleen uses them to guide the reader through diagnostic tests and treatment options, what to do when things go wrong, and when mistakes are made. All the while she explains what is happening and why. Recognising that anyone encountering cancer is in a state of shock, she delivers factual information intermingled with her own story, in an easily-digestible, and often amusing format. Each chapter ends with further information sources and a summary. Kathleen looks back on her cancer journey with honesty, humour and compassion, and with the benefit of her medical understanding and knowledge of the system. Later in the book she also explains medical research and how to assess the credibility of the numerous cancer treatment claims, and what we can all do to protect ourselves from cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The c-word'

The c-word (2015)

Arrow Books

The last thing Lisa Lynch had expected to put on her 'things to do before you're 30' list was beating breast cancer, but them's the breaks. So with her life on hold, and her mind stuffed with unspoken fears, questions and emotions, she turned to her computer and started blogging about the frustrating, life-altering, sheer pain-in-the-arse inconvenience of getting breast cancer at the age of 28. The C-Word is an unflinchingly honest and darkly humorous account of Lisa's battle with The Bullshit, as she came to call it. From the good days when she could almost pretend it wasn't happening, to the bad days, when she couldn't bear to wake up, Lisa's story is emotional, heartbreaking and often hilarious. The C-Word will make you laugh and cry, and ultimately reaffirm your faith in life. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Late fragments'

Late fragments (2015)

William Collins

Ambitious and talented, Kate Gross worked at Number 10 Downing Street for two British Prime Ministers whilst only in her twenties. At thirty, she was CEO of a charity working with fragile democracies in Africa. She had married 'the best looking man I've ever kissed' – and given birth to twin boys in 2008. The future was bright. But aged 34, Kate was diagnosed with advanced colon cancer. After a two-year battle with the disease, Kate died peacefully at home on Christmas morning, just ten minutes before her sons awoke to open their stockings. She began to write as a gift to herself, a reminder that she could create even as her body began to self-destruct. Written for those she loves,her book is not a conventional cancer memoir; nor is it filled with medical jargon or misery. Instead, it is Kate's powerful attempt to make sense of the woman who emerged in the strange, lucid final chunk of her life. Her book aspires to give hope and purpose to the lives of her readers even as her own life drew to its close. Kate should have been granted decades to say all that she says in these pages. Denied the chance to bore her children and grandchildren with stories when she became fat and old, she offers us all instead her thoughts on how to live; on the wonder to be found in the everyday; the importance of friendship and love; what it means to die before your time and how to fill your life with hope and joy even in the face of tragedy. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The fabulous woman’s guide through cancer. A lifestyle guide to help you through'

The fabulous woman’s guide through cancer. A lifestyle guide to help you through (2015)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

"The fabulous woman’s guide through cancer" is for every woman who has been touched by cancer, but is determined to still feel in control of their life. These fabulous women want to know about the lifestyle effects of having cancer. To know how to explain cancer to a toddler, what to pack for hospital, how to stay social when they don’t feel well enough to go out, how to survive a social event, how to tell their boss and what to do when depression takes hold. The Fabulous Woman's Guide Through Cancer gives real advice from real women who have really had cancer. It includes tips, examples, stories, information and ideas to keep women sane and on-track during this awful time. With everything from post-operation styling tips, ideas to stay social when you don’t think you can leave the house, dealing with doctors, ways to keep you lifted and plenty of kind words and inspirational stories from fabulous women who have had cancer. It is written with compassion and humour, in a style that is easily digestible whether you read it all in one go, or choose to dip in and out. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Thirty things about cancer. A guide to getting through'

Thirty things about cancer. A guide to getting through (2015)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

1 in 2 people in the UK will have cancer at some time of their lives. If you are one of them, this book is for you. It is packed with straightforward tips and clear guidance about dealing with every aspect of cancer and its treatment, focussed into 30 main topics. It also includes an extensive list of recommended books to read, websites to explore and facts and figures. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer survivors club'

The cancer survivors club (2015)

Oneworld Publications

The Cancer Survivors Club is a collection of truly inspirational, uplifting and assuring survival stories. These poignant personal accounts from normal people, demonstrate an extraordinary determination to survive against the odds. It proves with survival rates doubling, anything is possible. Unfortunately cancer affects everyone; worldwide there are around 12.7 million new cases diagnosed each year. Every two minutes someone in the UK is diagnosed with cancer. The Cancer Survivors Club has an excellent mix of stories, from the most common cancer, to the rarest. Some of the cancer types mentioned are; brain, bowel, breast, pancreatic, spinal, testicular, leukaemia, nasal and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Included in the book are a number of Chris Geiger's cheerful newspaper columns, including his humorous account of a prostate examination, getting sunburnt on a crowded beach and his Guinness World Record article. The Cancer Survivors Club will provide anyone touched by cancer with hope, strength and encouragement. Each story is written from the survivors or families own perspective, offering a very warm, friendly style of writing. This relaxed and sometimes humorous approach makes The Cancer Survivors Club an informative, positive and inspirational book that the reader will be able to relate to and gain strength from. Many cancer patients and those around them find the gruelling treatments very hard to cope with, they often feel very alone and isolated. This book allows anyone affected by the disease to focus their attention on surviving, ultimately making it their goal to share their story in future editions. Most patients have times when they feel they are the only person going through cancer treatment and have nobody to talk with. It is also a very difficult time for people close to the patient who have no previous experience in dealing with this disease. The Cancer Survivors Club is a must-read for the millions of cancer patients worldwide and a book of great support for their family and friends. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Under cover of darkness. How I blogged my way through mantle cell lymphoma'

Under cover of darkness. How I blogged my way through mantle cell lymphoma (2015)

O-Books (John Hunt Publishing)

Not only is this book an inspiring survival manual for cancer patients, but its humour and objectivity make it a choice read for anyone who enjoys real-life drama and pathos. Diagnosed with Mantle Cell Lymphoma in 2012 the author resorted to a blog to keep in touch with friends, and unwittingly ended up writing about the good, the bad and the ugly side of cancer, which attracted many followers. Is there a good? Very possibly. Bad and ugly, definitely. There is also an extremely funny side - wry observations that brought humour into an otherwise bleak landscape which included chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant. The author is also blessed with a big following from the Mind, Body, Spirit community of which she is a part (including Judy Hall, Anita Moorjani, Dolores Ashcroft-Nowicki); from this outpouring of expert support came advice on nutrition and alternative therapies which help to make this an invaluable source of information for cancer patients and their carers. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'There's something I've been dying to tell you'

There's something I've been dying to tell you (2014)

Coronet (Hodder & Stoughton)

In 2013 Lynda Bellingham was diagnosed with cancer. Having kept the details of her illness private, now for the very first time Lynda talks with beautiful poignancy about her life since her diagnosis, her family and how together they came to terms with a future they hadn't planned. Having been told that she only has a matter of months left to live and writing this in what will be her final days, There's something I’ve been dying to tell you is a brave and brutally honest memoir and yet Lynda also manages to spread her infectious warmth and humour, bringing light to a very dark time. Woven into this very moving and brave story are extraordinary, colourful tales of her acting and family life that will enlighten and entertain as well as the journey that Lynda has taken to find the family of her birth father having already suffered heartache in her search for her birth mother. In the search for her father's family, Lynda finds a family with a history in entertainment showing that acting was always in the blood. Lynda Bellingham was a tremendously gifted storyteller with a rich collection of tales of love, loss and laughter and this book brings her kind heart, courage and emotion to the page in vivid detail. Lynda's story is an affecting and at times heart-breaking one but it is so often laugh-out-loud too and ultimately the way Lynda tells her life story will serve as a great inspiration. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The small things that make all the difference. Hints and tips written for people affected by myeloma by people affected by myeloma'

The small things that make all the difference. Hints and tips written for people affected by myeloma by people affected by myeloma (2014)

Myeloma UK

This booklet contains a collection of hints and tips, quips and anecdotes from myeloma patients, their carers and families about their experiences of myeloma, its treatment and much more. 

Cover image of 'POG. Weathering the storm'

POG. Weathering the storm (2014)

Mereo Books

When Samantha received the devastating news that she had a cancer that was difficult to treat - in fact, the treatment itself might be fatal - she had to make some difficult choices about how to try and survive. Her story is full of pain, laughter and hope. Surrounded by her young children and supported by her husband, stepson, close family and friends, Samantha was able to overcome her illness through a mixture of conventional and unconventional treatments, some large leaps of faith and some very fortunate timing. She believes that with a combination of meditation and Eastern medicines she was able to put off further chemotherapies until Western science procured an answer. POG is a big thank-you letter to those who helped her on her journey. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Breast cancer. A journey from fear to empowerment'

Breast cancer. A journey from fear to empowerment (2014)

Britain’s Next Bestseller

If you're unfortunate enough to get breast cancer, the first question you may ask yourself is, 'Why me?'; Cath Filby asked herself the same question seven years ago when she was diagnosed. A double mastectomy, followed by chemotherapy, complementary therapy and reconstruction, using tissue from her stomach, followed. But this wasn't the end because Cath decided to write about her experiences in the hope that she could help others going through cancer to understand that, with faith, determination, support and an open mind, the journey through breast cancer can be far more bearable than you think. Cath describes each element of her treatment with a no-holds-barred approach but intersperses her story with a sprinkling of humour and more than a small dose of hope. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Colour me in'

Colour me in (2014)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Lori fills every piece of paper in the house with tropical scenes, covers her head and face with flowers and even paints a sea-scape on her mother-in-law's dining room walls. Life-affirming and uplifting, Colour Me In is a story of serious illness, the edges of sanity and the transforming power of art. It's about what can happen when crisis strikes and the life you have carefully stitched together comes apart at the seams. When all the relationships you treasure - with your partner, your children, your friends - are challenged. Lori finally connects with the one person who knows her most intimately, someone she has almost forgotten - herself. Through art, friends and a journey of discovery, Lori finds her way to healing a life which has been cruelly interrupted, to make something new, whole, better and as wonderful as her paintings. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer Olympics'

The cancer Olympics (2014)

Self-published using Friesen press

Diagnosed with a late-stage cancer, after years of bungled and inadequate medical attention...and then to discover that the best-practice chemotherapy is not available in your province. After her delayed diagnosis of colorectal cancer, Robin McGee reaches out to her community using a blog entitled "Robin's Cancer Olympics." Often uplifting and humourous, the blog posts and responses follow her into the harsh landscape of cancer treatment, medical regulation, and provincial politics. If she and her supporters are to be successful in lobbying the government for the chemotherapy, she must overcome many formidable and frightening hurdles. And time is running out. . . A true story, The Cancer Olympics is a suspenseful and poignant treatment of an unthinkable situation, an account of advocacy and survival that explores our deepest values regarding democracy, medicine, and friendship. www.thecancerolympics.com (Publisher)

Cover image of 'What a blip. A breast cancer journal of survival and finding the wisdom'

What a blip. A breast cancer journal of survival and finding the wisdom (2014)

Soul Rocks

It isn't what happens to you, it's what you do when it happens. Through the trauma of breast cancer Alicia Garey came out of the writing closet to share her experience and how she restored her balance. Facing the challenges of motherhood, running an interior design business while also being a wife, daughter, sister and friend, Alicia celebrates the gift of life through a new lens, and finds the joy by seeing the light in her darkest hours. Alicia dedicates her story to all of us who have or will face a terrifying life challenge. As far as she can tell, the challenges do indeed come our way, and we learn from them. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A brain tumour's travel tale'

A brain tumour's travel tale (2014)

Lulu.com

This is the diary of Claire Bullimore, who was diagnosed at the age of 25 with a life-threatening intraventricular meningioma, in other words a brain tumour the size of a grapefruit! It is not always easy for a person on the outside to see what is really happening to someone affected by a traumatic experience such as this. The book shows the true emotion of someone dealing with the hardships of a brain tumour, surgery, recovery and then the scars inside and out. Written as a series of diary entries you will feel like you are there on the journey. There is love, friendship and courage - you will cry, laugh, find things you didn't know before. This book can help families and friends or other outsiders to see what a brain tumour survivor really wants you to know. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The iceberg. A memoir'

The iceberg. A memoir (2014)

Atlantic Books

In 2008 the art critic Tom Lubbock was diagnosed with a brain tumour. The tumour was located in the area controlling speech and language, and would eventually rob him of the ability to speak. He died early in 2011. Marion Coutts was his wife. In short bursts of beautiful, textured prose, Coutts describes the eighteen months leading up to her partner's death. This book is an account of a family unit, man, woman, young child, under assault, and how the three of them fought to keep it intact. Written with extraordinary narrative force and power, The Iceberg is almost shocking in its rawness. It charts the deterioration of Tom's speech even as it records the developing language of his child. Fury, selfishness, grief, indignity and impotence are all examined and brought to light. Yet out of this comes a rare story about belonging, an 'adventure of being and dying'. This book is a celebration of each other, friends, family, art, work, love and language. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Until further notice, I am alive'

Until further notice, I am alive (2014)

Granta Books

In 2008, Tom Lubbock was diagnosed with a brain tumour, and told he had only one or two years to live. In this remarkable record of those years, lived out in three-month intervals between scans, he examines the question of how to live with death in sight. As the tumour progressed, Tom engaged intensely and imaginatively with work, art, friends, and his wife and their young son, while trying to remain focused on the fact of his impending death. His tumour was located in the area of the brain associated with language, and he describes losing control over the spoken and written word and the resources he drew on to keep communicating; a struggle which brought him ever closer to the mysteries of the origin of speech. As the Independent's chief art critic, he was renowned for the clarity and unconventionality of his writing, and the same fierce intelligence permeates this extraordinary memoir. This is a book written by a man wholly engaged with life even as it ends. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The ripple effect: how a positive attitude and a caring community helped save my life'

The ripple effect: how a positive attitude and a caring community helped save my life (2014)

Self-published using iUniverse

The author, Steven Lewis, in superb life-long health, was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, a disease with a survival rate of only 5%. In spite of this, Steven and his wife struggled to achieve and deliberately maintain an extremely positive attitude. This choice started a "ripple effect" that created an exceptionally caring and upbeat community of family, relatives and friends and enabled this community to return even more positive energy to Steven. The story became even more intense when Steven endured a second bout of pancreatic cancer that metastasized to his liver. Surviving a second bout of pancreatic cancer is so rare that no statistics are kept. Today, Steven is cancer free, in excellent health and works out strenuously. Virtually all of us, at some point, will experience extreme life difficulties involving circumstances such as severe illness, injuries, accidents, divorce or natural disasters. A positive attitude can help us think clearly, be solution oriented and ultimately prevail. Whether Steven physically survived or not, an attitude of complaint and negativity would have shattered his emotional life and that of his family. Steven's choice was to stay positive and upbeat in spite of his situation. What would you have done? (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Cancer is my teacher'

Cancer is my teacher (2014)

Quartet Books

Every two minutes someone in the UK is diagnosed with cancer. Lucy O'Donnell was herself three years ago. Cancer is My Teacher is her story, describing unflinchingly how she has turned the disease into a positive experience - and how you can do the same. Lucy's approach is determined but disciplined, clinical but also holistic. By addressing the physical, emotional, and spiritual aspects of cancer, Lucy covers the whole spectrum of the disease - including how to tell the family, the dos and donts of communicating with a patient, the side-effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy - and gives practical advice on how to keep looking your best and even what to pack for surgery. Cancer is My Teacher offers guidance for anyone in the early stages of diagnosis, in treatment or trying to readjust afterwards. It also helps family and loved ones to understand what they're going through - and, above all, carries a message of hope for everyone touched by cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Dancing with cancer (and how I learnt a few new steps)'

Dancing with cancer (and how I learnt a few new steps) (2014)

O-Books (John Hunt Publishing)

The late Diana Brueton had never been ill and on being diagnosed with metastatic bowel cancer in August 2007 she stepped into a parallel world of waiting rooms, treatments, friends and family who supported - or fled - as life became both exquisitely precious and terrible. Dancing with Cancer is a human drama, a ride on the rollercoaster of hope and despair and, as the gradients became gentler, a journey through meditation and creativity to wisdom and acceptance. Diana was a gifted writer and artist who worked for the BBC, The Bristol Cancer Help Centre and as a teacher and art therapist. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The c list. Colons, clinics, chemo and (quite a lot of cake): how I survived bowel cancer'

The c list. Colons, clinics, chemo and (quite a lot of cake): how I survived bowel cancer (2014)

Watkins Publishing

When facing with advanced cancer, the first thing this author did was look for other books from long time survivors of stage 4 bowel cancer to give her something to hold on to. Finding none, she wrote her own. With a wicked, taboo-breaking sense of humour and a gift for practicality, she shares her experiences and the lists she made to gain some control over what quickly became an unpredictable life. Both funny and poignant, she vividly describes the absurd situations she finds herself in from a brutally flippant surgeon to dating after cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The diary of a mother, her son and his monster'

The diary of a mother, her son and his monster (2014)

Empire Publications

Caroline Burch experienced every parent's worst nightmare when her son Elliot was diagnosed with cancer when he was just six months old. To document her experiences she kept a diary detailing the ups and downs of her son's treatment and the emotional anguish of their situation from diagnosis to remission. Ten years later, and with Elliot happily recovered from the condition that threatened his life, Caroline looks back at the traumatic months when there appeared to be no end in sight to the misery. Caroline's story is proof that there is life after cancer and this book is a tribute to the tireless work of the individuals who help parents and their children emerge from their nightmare. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'I've been there. 50 tips on coping with lymphoma'

I've been there. 50 tips on coping with lymphoma (2014)

Tips for coping with lymphoma from a patient.

Cover image of 'Probably nothing. A diary of not-your-average nine months'

Probably nothing. A diary of not-your-average nine months (2014)

Viking

A moving, funny and inspiring graphic memoir by a woman who discovered she had cancer whilst she was pregnant: 'I am glad. And then sad. (But) Mum's bought me a furry snood. 'Ooh, lovely!'' At 31, Matilda Tristram was 17 weeks pregnant and looking forward to having her first baby. Then she discovered she had cancer. This touching and hilarious graphic memoir, which is never morose or self-pitying, starts at the moment Matilda was diagnosed and ends when her course of chemotherapy finishes in October 2013. Recording the awkward conversations, the highs and lows of treatment, the mixed blessings of receiving 'Get Well' cards, and the reality of still having to queue too long for croissants, Matilda captures her experiences with characteristic style and warmth. Along the way she cherishes the small details of life, and learns not to sweat the big things. Her beautiful and boisterous son was born without complications and is reliably keeping her up most nights. Charming, witty and uplifting - this unique and beautifully illustrated book will leave you cherishing the good things in life, and ready to face your own challenges. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Travels with Cookie. Narrowboat cruising with a cat'

Travels with Cookie. Narrowboat cruising with a cat (2014)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Between 2004 and 2006, David Thomas experienced a series of disasters in his life, culminating in being told that he only had a short time left to live. Rather than sinking into despair as many people would, he decided to fulfil his lifelong dream of living on a canal boat, while he still could. So he bought a narrowboat, LadyRiverMouse (an anagram of 'Live Your Dreams') with a view to spending the rest of his limited life cruising the canals and rivers of England. Naturally, he had to take the love of his life with him – a rather bad-tempered fluffy white prima donna of a cat called Cookie. Cookie was an indoor cat who had rarely been outside, never mind living on a boat, where according to David dogs are usually the pets of choice. Would it work out? David didn't know, but as he put it, “I wasn't going anywhere without my beloved Cookie”. The remainder of the book is an account of the few years David spent travelling through the waterways of his native land. Many people live on boats; few cruise as extensively as David did – to London, along the Thames, up to Wales, then tackling the wild and often desolate rivers of North West England. A beginner to boating when he started, David learned much as time went on, mainly by having numerous – and often hair-raising - adventures. So did Cookie, who contrived to get lost, fall in the water on a number of occasions, and generally use up most of her cat's nine lives. Finally David met Helen, a helicopter instructor, writer, and – most importantly – cat lover. They fell in love, and David's life began to change yet again, leading to the eventual sale of LadyRiverMouse and a new life in the Peak District for David and Cookie. David knows about boating, has an eye for detail, and is also an astute observer of his fellow men and women, both on and off the waterways. Therefore this book will clearly be of interest to those who have ever travelled on the canals or done any other boating, anyone who loves travel of any type, or simply the armchair traveller who enjoys reading about others' adventures. But “Travels With Cookie” is more than just another boating or travel book. It is a tale of bereavement and divorce, of terminal illness and despair, and finally of romance, a seemingly miraculous cure, and a new life. Hence it should appeal to anyone who likes human interest stories of any type. And of course – as Cookie herself would tell you if she could speak - it i

Cover image of 'Laryngectomy is not a tragedy. An introduction to pharyngeal speech'

Laryngectomy is not a tragedy. An introduction to pharyngeal speech (2013)

Cancer Laryngectomee Trust

This updated edition contains the original chapters written by Sydney Norgate in 1989 plus additional material by Dr Nicola Oswald on current speech methods and future developments. It will provide help and encouragement to all laryngectomy patients and their families. It is full of practical advice and information, as well as reassurance. The author, who had himself had his larynx removed, wrote from personal experience of the problems caused by the loss of normal speech, and describes the method of learning to use substitute pharyngeal speech. Written in a straightforward, humorous style and illustrated with cartoons 'Laryngectomy is not a Tragedy' has proved to be a valuable source of advice and inspiration to all those who face this operation. (Publisher)

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