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Publications directory

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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 190

Cover image of 'The shock factor. Sarah's story – beating breast cancer one day at a time'

The shock factor. Sarah's story – beating breast cancer one day at a time (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

The door handle started to turn and I knew this was the moment that could change my life forever. Mr Mahadev appeared with another staff member. He introduced himself and then introduced Sally, a breast care nurse, and sat down beside me. He started to go through my notes: family history, the results of the mammogram and the biopsy. Then he delivered the devastating news... I’m really sorry but the mammogram has shown two tumours in the left breast. Sarah Pickles was a normal 32-year-old married woman with a young daughter. On 22nd September 2014 her life changed as she was given the devastating news that she had a triple-negative breast cancer. Read about how Sarah dealt with her diagnosis and how she survived cancer as she shares all the high, lows, tears, and laughter of her journey. This honest and raw account of Sarah’s cancer journey also includes lots of information and top tips on diet, exercise, health, and beauty. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A series of catastrophes and miracles. A true story of love, science and cancer'

A series of catastrophes and miracles. A true story of love, science and cancer (2016)

National Geographic

After being diagnosed in her early 40s with metastatic melanoma, journalist and mother of two Mary Elizabeth Williams finds herself in a race against the clock. She takes a once-in-a-lifetime chance and joins a clinical trial for immunotherapy, a revolutionary drug regimen that trains the body to vanquish malignant cells. Astonishingly, her cancer disappears entirely in just a few weeks. But at the same time, her best friend embarks on a cancer journey of her own - with very different results. Williams's experiences as a patient and a medical test subject reveal with stark honesty what it takes to weather disease, the extraordinary new developments that are rewriting the rules of science - and the healing power of human connection. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Rise. Surviving and thriving after trauma'

Rise. Surviving and thriving after trauma (2016)

Weidenfeld and Nicholson

Renowned as a much-loved and highly respected journalist and broadcaster with thirty years' experience, Sian Williams has studied the impact of acute stress for many years and is also a trained trauma assessor. In RISE, she explores the science of resilience and growth after trauma, offers advice from the experts, and learns from those who have emerged from horrific experiences, feeling changed yet stronger, with a new perspective on their life, their relationships and their work. She also documents her own path through breast cancer, with candid and unflinching honesty. Her story provides a narrative thread through a book designed to help others deal with all manner of adversity, including physical or mental ill health; loss of a loved one; abuse and post-traumatic stress. RISE is a deeply researched exploration of trauma, grief and illness, and most importantly resilience in the darkest of days. It is an inspiring and powerful piece of work, full of honesty, warmth and wisdom. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'I’m just a person. My year of death, cancer and epiphany'

I’m just a person. My year of death, cancer and epiphany (2016)

Bluebird (Pan Macmillan)

In the span of four months in 2012, Tig Notaro was hospitalized for a debilitating intestinal disease called C. diff, her mother unexpectedly died, she went through a breakup, and then she was diagnosed with bilateral breast cancer. Hit with this devastating barrage, Tig took her grief onstage. Days after receiving her cancer diagnosis, she broke new comedic ground, opening an unvarnished set with the words: 'Good evening. Hello. I have cancer. How are you? Hi, how are you? Is everybody having a good time? I have cancer.' The set instantly went viral, and was ultimately released as Tig's sophomore album, Live, which sold one hundred thousand units in just six weeks and was later nominated for a Grammy. Now, the wildly popular star takes stock of that no good, very bad year - a difficult yet astonishing period in which tragedy turned into absurdity and despair transformed into joy. An inspired combination of the deadpan silliness of her comedy and the open-hearted vulnerability that has emerged in the wake of that dire time, I'm Just a Person is a moving and often hilarious look at this very brave, very funny woman's journey into the darkness and her thrilling return from it. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Dying. A memoir'

Dying. A memoir (2016)

Canongate Books Ltd

At the age of sixty, Cory Taylor was dying of melanoma-related brain cancer. With her illness no longer treatable, she began at the start of 2016 to write about her experiences and, in an extraordinary creative surge, wrote what would become Dying: A Memoir. This is a brief and clear-eyed account of what dying taught Cory: amid the tangle of her feelings, she reflects on the patterns of her life, and remembers the lives and deaths of her parents. She tells us why she would like to be able to choose the circumstances of her own death. Dying is about the vulnerability and strength, courage and humility, anger and acceptance that it takes to live a good life and say goodbye to it in peace. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cancer with a small 'c''

Cancer with a small 'c' (2016)

Self-published using WritersWorld

This book follows the journey of my life through approximately a ten-year period during which time I was diagnosed with breast cancer. It contains highs and lows and hopefully will shine a positive light on this disease that will encourage other women.v Although any cancer diagnosis is devastating not only to a patient but also to their family, a positive outlook, a grateful heart and a belief that life can only get better is vital to recovery. There will be readers who understand the attitude that overtook me at the time; my marriage breakdown will resonate with others - just as our reconciliation will also be close to the hearts of some people.I also draw on some hilarious moments, because it wasn't all bad, my cancer attacked me when I was most in need of a break from life. Disastrous, worrying, life threatening and emotionally draining, the story will touch on some very personal, sad moments but also the victorious end when I refuse to even acknowledge that I had cancer. Yes, it was real, but it deserves no place in my life any more and certainly no capital 'c'.A cathartic book for me and hopefully an encouragement to others who may be going through a similar situation to mine, this book is an honest account of how I drove myself to get well again. Ten years on, my life is so different that I hardly recognise the person in the story. But it was me and it is my story. (Author)

Cover image of 'The butterfly within. A triathlete's race against a brain tumour'

The butterfly within. A triathlete's race against a brain tumour (2016)

Book Guild Publishing

"The butterfly within" follows Special Educational Needs PE teacher and international triathlete Rachel Bown through a year which changes her life forever. It begins on the day she is diagnosed with a brain tumour and finishes when she proudly returns to racing for Team GB. The reader is taken on a roller coaster ride of emotions. We witness hope exploring new depths and determination reaching new heights. She writes about the characters she meets along the way and how they have helped her to become the person she is today. Throughout her story, Rachel recognises the love of those closest to her and understands fully how lucky she is to have their unwavering support. Her focus is always on embracing the life she has been given and defying the so-called insurmountable. Rachel's humorous outlook will have the reader laughing with her wit and honesty; and perhaps shedding a few tears at the low points of her story. Fundamentally, she wants to show that people are good and kind and that if you have faith, there is always hope. A truly inspirational story as Rachel fights her tumour with everything she's got! (Publisher)

Cover image of 'It's all just rock and roll...: a terrifically truthful tale of one girl's bust up with breast cancer'

It's all just rock and roll...: a terrifically truthful tale of one girl's bust up with breast cancer (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

A truly inspirational story about love, life, happiness and hair. A true story about a girl's victorious battle with breast cancer. She had a choice to make - to crumble or to fight. Her daughter was four, her job was full on and she was spinning a million plates. She was the queen of dodging reality through all the twists and turns of life. This was different - she had to find a way to face her worst fears and to get herself out of the pickle of all pickles. Little did she know that the very same disease that had claimed her parents when she was far too young was to be her most unlikely saviour. She tells the story in real time with humour, a blunt Yorkshire honesty and breath taking courage. What really happens when you're trying to keep your head (and your hair) when the rest of the world is going mad. And what really happens when you finally find your very own sunshine. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'In gratitude'

In gratitude (2016)

Bloomsbury Publishing

The future flashed before my eyes in all its pre-ordained banality. Embarrassment, at first, to the exclusion of all other feelings. But embarrassment curled at the edges with a weariness. I got a joke in. 'So - we'd better get cooking the meth,' I said to the Poet. In August 2014, Jenny Diski was diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer and given 'two or three years' to live. She didn't know how to react. All responses felt scripted, laden with cliché. Being a writer, she decided to write about it (grappling with the unoriginality even of this), and also to tell a story she has not yet told: that of being taken in, aged fifteen, by the author Doris Lessing, and the subsequent fifty years of their complex relationship. In September 2014 Jenny Diski began writing in the London Review of Books, describing her experience of living with terminal cancer, examining her life and history with Doris Lessing: the fairy-tale rescue from 'the bin' as a teenager, the difficulties of being absorbed into an unfamiliar family and the influence this had on her. Swooping from one memory to the next - alighting on the hysterical battlefield of her parental home, her expulsion from school, stacking shelves in Banbury and the drug-taking twenty-something in and out of psychiatric hospitals, Diski paints a portrait of two extraordinary writers - Lessing and herself. From one of our most original voices comes a book like no other: a cerebral, witty, dazzlingly candid masterpiece about an uneasy relationship; about memory and writing, ingratitude and anger; about living with illness and facing death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Living with Timmy'

Living with Timmy (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

The writer’s personal story, who on the threshold of retirement, is diagnosed with a rare brain tumour. How will he cope as he uncovers more and more detail about the tumour? Does he opt for risky brain surgery or for a “watch and wait” strategy? And will his life ever be the same again? Follow his personal journey from diagnosis to the present day in this story. (Publisher)

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