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Publications directory

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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 190

Cover image of 'Dolly daydreamer'

Dolly daydreamer (2017)

Austin Macauley

Rachel and Simon have been married for a long time. They are both parents and grandparents. They love Portugal, but life isn’t as perfect as it appears on the surface. Rachel had breast cancer and as time goes on, family circumstances threaten the very fabric of the family. Is their family unit strong enough to survive what the future has in store for Rachel, Simon and the rest of their family? (Publisher)

Cover image of 'All to live for. Fighting cancer. Finding hope.'

All to live for. Fighting cancer. Finding hope. (2017)

Headline

In 2005 Emma Hannigan was 32, happily married to her long-time love, with two young children. Her world was shattered when she discovered that she had the rare gene BRCA1, meaning a 50% chance of developing ovarian cancer and an 85% chance of breast cancer. To reduce the risk, Emma had a double mastectomy and both ovaries removed, but in 2007 received the news that cancer had struck anyway. Twelve years later, Emma is battling cancer for the tenth time. With warmth and wisdom, she shares her journey and her advice on everything from skincare and hair loss to how to keep a sense of humour through it all. All to Live For is a story of one woman's determination not to let cancer win; a story of strength and inspiration, hope and love. And of never giving up. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Chemo summer. An uplifting breast cancer experience'

Chemo summer. An uplifting breast cancer experience (2017)

Austin Macauley

In Chemo Summer Jane Hoggar takes the reader through a light-hearted and informative account of her discovery of breast cancer and its cure. Cancer of any description has the capacity to chill those it affects and their loved ones. But for Jane Hoggar early discovery and diagnosis provided for a satisfactory resolution. And it's these small details that might well help people in a similar situation. For example, Jane did not discover a lump, which is the usual thing in breast cancer, but a sag' when she raised her arms and it was her insistence that something was wrong that resulted in a vital early medical diagnosis. All the side issues are covered in the book, effects of chemo and radiotherapy, hair loss and wigs, changes in diet and exercise, making Chemo Summer a valuable and engaging look into a serious and often frightening subject. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Going on the turn. A memoir'

Going on the turn. A memoir (2017)

Weidenfeld and Nicholson

Danny Baker's third volume of memoirs barrels along at the same cracking pace as its predecessors, the bestselling Going to Sea in a Sieve (the inspiration for the major TV series Cradle to Grave and subsequent nationwide tour) and Going off Alarming. With his trademark exuberance, he recalls the years which included six years' involvement in the massive TV hit TFI Friday ('piling it up with hellzapoppin' ideas') - during which time he stalked John Cleese in New York, entertained David Bowie and Paul McCartney, bizarrely reunites with Sir Michael Caine, gets befriended by Peter O'Toole and becomes a member of Led Zeppelin for 35 minutes. However, the tales are not reliant on celebrity alone, and the book comes packed with the usual quota of Baker family jewels, including Spud's attitude to doctors, Danny's trip to Amsterdam to get stoned for the first time (he fails), getting caught up in football rioting, and the now infamous 'kaboom' of an outburst following his despatch from BBC London. And then there's the cancer. Spoiler alert: this is the one in which he almost dies. Further spoiler alert: he doesn't. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Love, light and mermaid tails. One woman's healing journey back to wholeness through stage four cancer'

Love, light and mermaid tails. One woman's healing journey back to wholeness through stage four cancer (2017)

Fi Munro

In January 2016, at the age of 30, Fi Munro was diagnosed with non-genetic stage four ovarian cancer. In that moment, after months of pain, tests and assurances that it was ‘nothing to worry about’, her instincts were proved right and her worst fears were realised. In the months that followed, understanding her diagnosis, recovery and health became her full-time job. Using her expertise as a researcher she dedicated her time to understanding everything she could about her diagnosis and subsequent prognosis. In this honest, open and often tear-jerking account of her journey back to wholeness, Fi openly shares her story from diagnosis with stage four ‘terminal’ cancer to living an incredible, healthy life full of joy and laughter. This book is a guide for anyone, not just those with cancer, who wants to embrace a happier, healthier and more caring approach to their life. May it bring you hope, peace and, above all, joy. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Inside the wave'

Inside the wave (2017)

Bloodaxe Books

To be alive is to be inside the wave, always travelling until it breaks and is gone. These poems are concerned with the borderline between the living and the dead - the underworld and the human living world - and the exquisitely intense being of both. They possess a spare, eloquent lyricism as they explore the bliss and anguish of the voyage. Inside the Wave, Helen Dunmore's tenth and final book of poetry. Her final poem, 'Hold out your arms', written shortly before her death and not included in the first printing of Inside the Wave, has now been added to the reprint. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Hair everywhere'

Hair everywhere (2017)

Istros Books

Hair Everywhere is the story of one family and how they manage to cope when the mother is diagnosed with cancer. It is a delicate tale that balances itself between the generations, revealing their strengths and weaknesses in times of trouble. It is also a story about how roles within a family can change when things become challenging, due to sickness or death, allowing some to grow and others to fade. Ultimately, this is a book about life; full of humour and absurdity as well as sadness, and set against an everyday background where the ordinary takes on new significance and colour. Tea Tulic’s debut novel is a brave glance at the human condition. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Having a bad hair day'

Having a bad hair day (2017)

Clare C Davison

“Tomorrow, you will feel a little bit better.” From a loving childhood, belonging to a large family with no history of breast cancer, Clare was alarmed at age 42 to accidentally discover she had the disease. As a self-employed single mum, Clare documents her memoirs of personal experience and knowledge of the cruel decisions made for the aggressive treatments and hair loss ahead. With an inner strength of humour, Clare’s first book includes her lunch arrangements with Peter Andre, a cake nationally released in her honour, an experience of public speaking, media attention and continued fundraising with a moving excerpt from her son. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Connecting with cancer. Living with and beyond cancer'

Connecting with cancer. Living with and beyond cancer (2017)

Melrose Books

Surgeon: You’ve got cancer, but we can keep you going for a few months, or maybe a few years. Me: Okay, which is it, months or years? Surgeon: Silence. Me: Will it kill me? Surgeon: Yes, it probably will. That was when my head went into overdrive and I lost the plot. Hearing that you have cancer is a life-changing moment. Connecting with Cancer tells the stories of different people affected by different cancers: how their lives were changed, how they found an inner strength, how they found hope and a life after cancer. Each story is personal and sometimes very intimate; in the pages of this book, you will learn what cancer feels like. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cancer was my companion. A memoir'

Cancer was my companion. A memoir (2017)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

This is the story of a man coming to terms with his own mortality. Originally diagnosed with colon cancer, he fought to survive the treatment, only to find that the disease had spread to his liver. Further surgery saved his life again. It was an experience that helped him realise what he thought he already knew, but really didn’t: that he could die. David I Brown writes with both sensitivity and raging anger. It is an unusual mixture of styles with plenty of black humour peppered in between. Drawing on his keen observations, Brown explains the medical processes he underwent from diagnosis through treatment to recovery and provides us with a harsh but beautifully fierce – almost surreal – understanding of his emotional journey. (Publisher)

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