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Publications directory

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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 190

Cover image of 'Gone in the morning. A writer’s journey of bereavement'

Gone in the morning. A writer’s journey of bereavement (2018)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

An exploration of death, bereavement and grief. This first hand account gives Geoff Mead's experience of responding to the loss of his wife from a brain tumour. Giving insight into the grieving process and how Geoff learned to manage his grief, this book will offer hope to anyone experiencing something similar. After coming to the realisation that mourning is a conscious process, to which we can apply creativity, passion and intelligence, Geoff explored the unknown territory of bereavement through his writing. The book shows how artful practice, such as writing, can help to make sense of our experience and navigate the wreckage of grief. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'Spoiler alert: the hero dies. A memoir of love, loss and other four-letter words'

Spoiler alert: the hero dies. A memoir of love, loss and other four-letter words (2018)

Atria Books (Simon and Schuster)

In this evocative and gorgeously wrought memoir reminiscent of Rob Sheffield’s Love Is a Mixtape and George Hodgman’s Bettyville, Michael Ausiello—a respected TV columnist and founder and editor-in-chief of TVLine.com—remembers his late husband, and the lessons, love, and laughter that they shared throughout their fourteen years together. For the past decade, TV fans of all stripes have counted upon Michael Ausiello’s insider knowledge to get the scoop on their favorite shows and stars. From his time at Soaps in Depth to his influential stints at TV Guide and Entertainment Weekly to his current role as founder and editor-in-chief of the wildly popular website TVLine.com, Michael has established himself as the go-to expert when it comes to our most popular form of entertainment. What many of his fans don’t know, however, is that while his professional life was in full swing, Michael had to endure the greatest of personal tragedies: his husband, Kit Cowan, was diagnosed with a rare and very aggressive form of neuroendocrine cancer. Over the course of eleven months, Kit and Michael did their best to combat the deadly disease, but Kit succumbed to his illness in February 2015. In this heartbreaking and darkly hilarious memoir, Michael tells the story of his harrowing and challenging last year with Kit while revisiting the thirteen years that preceded it, and how the undeniably powerful bond between him and Kit carried them through all manner of difficulty—always with laughter front and center in their relationship. Instead of a tale of sadness and loss, Spoiler Alert: The Hero Dies is an unforgettable, inspiring, and beautiful testament to the resilience and strength of true love. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'All the time we thought we had'

All the time we thought we had (2018)

Polygon (Birlinn Imprint)

How do you start a new life when the person you love is about to die? At the age of thirty-six, Gordon Darroch's wife was diagnosed with breast cancer. It was a devastating blow just as he, and their two children with autism, were preparing to move to her native Holland. Eighteen months later, as their plans seemed to be back on course, came the second blow: Magteld was terminally ill and possibly had only a few months to live. As her health rapidly deteriorated, they became caught up in a race against time to get a dying mother home and give their children a future in a country they hardly knew. How could they build a new life in the midst of grief and loss? How would their two sons adjust to such enormous changes? And what would remain of Magteld once she was gone? All the Time We Thought We Had is a story of love and loss and a meditation on grief and memory. It's about how events shape our lives and how we cope with them. And it raises important questions about what we value in life and the legacies we leave behind. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A moment of grace. A story of love and loss'

A moment of grace. A story of love and loss (2018)

Ebury Press (Penguin Random House)

Patrick Dillon and Nicola Thorold were together for twenty-eight years. Patrick was an award-winning architect and writer and Nicola a leading figure in theatre, awarded an OBE for her contribution to the arts at London’s Roundhouse. Their two children were almost grown-up. Life was good. And then, in May 2015, Nicola was diagnosed with leukaemia. After several rounds of treatment, a bone marrow transplant and many waves of recovery and decline, she died thirteen months after her diagnosis. Six months later, at Christmas, Patrick started to write. A Moment of Grace is the searing, tender account of Patrick’s life with Nicola and her illness, and his life after her loss. But it is more than a story of illness and unbearable grief: it is a book of memory, of home, of family. It is a tale of the transfiguring power of love. Heartbreaking, life-affirming and truly unforgettable, A Moment of Grace is one man’s journey to find life after his wife’s death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Not that kind of love. A sister, a brother, some tumours and a cat'

Not that kind of love. A sister, a brother, some tumours and a cat (2018)

Quercus

A moving, thought-provoking and surprisingly humorous book which is both a description of a journey to death and a celebration of the act of living. Based on Clare Wise's blog, which she started when she was first diagnosed with cancer in 2013, Not That Kind of Love charts the highs and lows of the last three years of Clare's life. The end result is not a book that fills you with despair and anguish. On the contrary, Not That Kind of Love should be read by everybody for its candour, and for its warmth and spirit. Clare is an astonishingly dynamic, witty and fun personality, and her positivity and energy exude from every page. As she becomes too weak to type, her brother - the actor Greg Wise - takes over, and the book morphs into a beautiful meditation on life, and the necessity of talking about death. With echoes of Atul Gawande's Being Mortal and Cathy Rentzenbrink's The Last Act of Love, it is a very special read that rejoices in the extraordinary and often underestimated sibling bond, and the importance of making the most of the ordinary pleasures life has to offer. As Greg Wise writes in the book: 'Celebrate the small things, the small moments. If you find yourself with matching socks as you leave the house in the morning, that is a cause for celebration. If the rest of the day is spent finding the cure for cancer, or brokering world peace, then that's a bonus.' (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'A new kind of normal'

A new kind of normal (2018)

Self-published

They say there’s a book in all of us, but I doubt I would ever have written one had it not have been for my diagnosis of breast cancer in 2011. ‘A New Kind of Normal' is the story of my life up to and moving on from that moment. Growing up in the 60's, working through the 70's and 80's, juggling a career in TV and radio while bringing up three children and surviving two divorces. From the moment I knew what a bra was, I’d wanted breasts: I even crafted a pair of blue plasticine boobs for myself, as nature made me wait until I was 15 for breasts of my own! Through cancer I lost them both, and with the chemotherapy; all my hair, my fingernails, and more worryingly, a sense of whom I was. My hair grew back, as did my fingernails, but I still struggled with my identity. What I’ve written isn't a diary, nor a self-help guide, and it's not just about cancer. I’ve taken a really good look at the little girl I was and the woman I grew into, and why I went to such lengths to try and claw back some of what cancer had taken from me - it's not everyone's way I appreciate, and it’s been an interesting exercise trying to ascertain why it was mine! I’ve been honest, open, and meticulous when it comes to detail, as I firmly believe that if you take away the mystery, you can take away some of the fear. But there’s a lot to laugh about here too, as luckily I’ve always been able to see the funny side of a situation, preferring that to the occasional overwhelming despair I felt. In this book I've tried to move the disease away from the medical professionals and the hospitals, and to bring it into the day to day, because that's where it sits. Over the last seven years I’ve come to realise that the ripple effect of cancer is far reaching, affecting not just those of us living with it but everyone around us. 'A New Kind of Normal' gives an insight into my relationship with my then partner, now husband; my children and their reaction to my illness, my family and friends, my work colleagues, people who wrote to me, and the professionals who cared for me; everybody reacts differently. Breast cancer assaults your femininity - the treatment is tough and the surgery brutal.  It isn't easy, but it is possible, and I'd like to feel this book may be a source of comfort to anyone who's life is touched by breast cancer; maybe even help them to find their 'New Kind of Normal'. There are many things in life we may have to give up on, but hope is not one of them. (P

Cover image of '#dearcancer: Things to help you through [Kindle]'

#dearcancer: Things to help you through [Kindle] (2017)

Trapeze (Orion)

When journalist and broadcaster Victoria Derbyshire was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2015, she made the decision to share her experiences in a series of video diaries to help demystify cancer treatment. Overwhelmed by the response, Victoria set up a Facebook page inviting people to share their tories, talk openly about cancer and support one another. The result is this collection of writing from cancer patients and their loved ones. Whether you have recently been diagnosed with cancer, or a friend or relative has, everyone who has contributed to this ebook has been through the same journey, and hopes you will take strength from these 'things to help you through'. From practical tips on managing your treatment and your everyday life with cancer, to advice on understanding and dealing with the emotional rollercoaster that begins with diagnosis, this free resource is packed with hard-won wisdom and insight, at once useful and poignant. This exclusive collection is published ahead of Victoria Derbyshire's book, Dear Cancer, Love Victoria: A Mum's Diary of Hope. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A most clarifying battle: the spirit and cancer'

A most clarifying battle: the spirit and cancer (2017)

O-Books (John Hunt Publishing)

Part resource and part memoir, this is the work of an extraordinarily courageous and shining figure who finished her manuscript before her illness finally claimed her. A Most Clarifying Battle provides a foundation for the reader to understand the experiential issues involved in living and dying with a cancer diagnosis and suggests simple exercises that can be used to build spiritual muscle and enhance quality of life. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Welcome to the Pink Ladies Club. Fighting breast cancer and finding friends'

Welcome to the Pink Ladies Club. Fighting breast cancer and finding friends (2017)

Independently published

Karen Bates was diagnosed with breast cancer after a routine screening. In this frank and heartfelt memoir, she shares her story and tips for surviving breast cancer, chemotherapy and reconstruction surgery. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The owl at the window. A memoir of loss and hope'

The owl at the window. A memoir of loss and hope (2017)

Coronet (Hodder & Stoughton)

Award-winning TV comedy writer Carl Gorham's account of his bereavement is by turns deeply moving and darkly humorous. Part love story, part widower's diary, part tales of single parenting, it tells of his wife's cancer, her premature death and his attempts to rebuild his life afterwards with his six -year old daughter. Realised in a series of vivid snapshots, it takes the reader on an extraordinary journey from Oxford to Australia, from Norfolk to Hong Kong through fear, despair, pain and anger to hope, laughter and renewal. The Owl at the Window is a fresh and original exploration of what it means to lose a partner in your forties, and how Carl learned to live again. (Publisher)

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