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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 192

Cover image of 'The end of your life book club'

The end of your life book club (2013)

Two Roads

When New York publisher Will Schwalbe’s mother was diagnosed with cancer, he went with her to her treatments. To while away the time in the hospital they distracted themselves with talk of the books they’d read and shared and recommended and, in Will’s case, sometimes pretended to read. But while you might pretend to a bookseller you’ve read a book you don’t pretend to your mother who is dying of cancer. So they read and re-read and explored that particular bond of books they’d always shared. Thus was born a very special book club with just two members: a mother and a son. The ones they choose range from classic to popular, from fantastic to spiritual, and we hear their passion for reading and their love for each other in their intimate and searching discussions. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Eek! My mummy has breast cancer'

Eek! My mummy has breast cancer (2013)

Club Books

When my mum was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012 it literally rocked my world, the world of my family, and the world of our friends. I searched everywhere looking for information about breast cancer that teenagers could understand and relate to - I couldn't find any. I decided if I couldn't find any books about breast cancer that I, as a teenager, could understand, I would have to write my own book from my experience on dealing with a loved one who has been diagnosed with cancer and in the hope others could find useful that I struggled to find originally. This is what I put together and for all teenagers and young people out there I hope you find this book useful, helpful and most of all: comforting. Emma Sutherland. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The pink moon lovelies. Empowering stories of survival'

The pink moon lovelies. Empowering stories of survival (2013)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

The Pink Moon Lovelies are members of the Facebook group Beyond the Pink Moon, named after Nicki Boscia Durlester’s memoir that intimately chronicles her journey after a breast cancer diagnosis. Nicki created the group to provide an active forum for discussion to raise awareness about the BRCA gene and breast and ovarian cancer. She never dreamed her homespun story would travel around the globe and Beyond the Pink Moon would become a support group for people from all walks of life coming together to lift each other up with inspiration, humor, faith and love. With Lovelies in Australia, Canada, England, France, Ireland, Israel, Mexico, Namibia, New Zealand, Singapore, Slovakia, South Africa, Sweden, Tasmania and the USA, Nicki, a BRCA2 survivor, and fellow moderator, Melissa Johnson Voight, a BRCA1 previvor, whose journey of steadfast faith and courage of conviction is included in this book, have encouraged their members to tell their stories with one goal in mind, to save lives. With a Foreword written by renowned breast surgeon, Dr. Kristi Funk, this riveting collection of 50 stories includes: the unflinching account of Barbie Ritzco, a United States Marine who kept silent about discovering a lump in her breast in order to deploy with her unit to Afghanistan, putting her country before her health, the moving story of Ally Durlester, Nicki’s daughter, a 25 year old BRCA2 previvor who will undergo prophylactic surgery to try to avoid the same fate as her mother, grandmother and six great-aunts who all had breast, ovarian or fallopian tube cancer, the frustrating story of Erika Grogin Lange, an Israeli Lovely and mother of five, whose nagging symptoms of fatigue, nausea and bloating went undiagnosed for months until she heard the shocking news that she had Stage III ovarian cancer, and the unpredictable journey of Susan Long Martucci, a two-time breast cancer survivor, disease free for 13 years, blindsided by another diagnosis. She is the beacon of hope who coined the term Pink Moon Lovelies. Each story is compelling and has an important message to impart. The Pink Moon Lovelies, Empowering Stories of Survival concludes with the story of the incomparable May Smith, the 32 year old South African Lovely who left a legacy of extraordinary courage, grace and love. Hers was a life well lived. When May sadly passed away on July 22, 2012 from breast cancer she left the Pink Moon Lovelies with one final message filled with wisdom and advice beyond her years. H

Cover image of 'The dog, the chick and the reindeer. The story of a family living with cancer'

The dog, the chick and the reindeer. The story of a family living with cancer (2013)

Apollo Publishing

In 2004 my mother asked us to donate to the Macmillan team in lieu of a present. It is ironic that she then developed and survived endometrial cancer in 2006 and was diagnosed with and died from ovarian cancer in 2012, especially as the Macmillan team supported us to keep her in the home she loved right to the end. The story tells of the effects of both cancers on Mum and the rest of the family. Naturally there were sad times and some excruciatingly painful and stressful times but there were also some funny and touching moments. Audrey, Mum's sister was coincidentally diagnosed with oesophageal cancer and at one point they were in different wards at opposite ends of the same hospital. The day we were told of Mum’s diagnosis, we wheeled her down to sit with Audrey and they held hands and hugged, one in a wheelchair and the other hooked up to all kinds of machinery. Audrey died thirteen days after mum. There is no doubt that my mother loved her family - she had nearly ninety children, grandchildren, great grandchildren and great, great grandchildren, both biological and adopted; whilst the story is written from my perspective, I wasn't the only one to suffer and it could easily have been written by thirty or forty other people. When I found out mum had a terminal illness I made up my mind to take her back to her home, which is the only place she wanted to be; some people thought I was mad but we had a dedicated team of family and were lucky to be further supported by her GP, the DN’s and Macmillan team. I organised weekly rotas to ensure 24 hour care: The book tells how we coped with this and of my panic the day I found out the Macmillan support team didn’t have any sitters for the following week. It also portrays the “normal” things we did along as we rode our six year emotional roller coaster, such as going on holidays and dealing with other family crises. The last twelve months before her death were intolerable. The last six months a nightmare, and the ten weeks between diagnosis and her passing were hell on earth but we had some laughs, we cried and we sang songs. A few weeks before she died, as my daughter entered the room Mum was playing a game with my younger grandchildren, throwing the tiny purple chick to each of them in turn and giggling along with them, its tail flashing as though it too was enjoying the fun. I initially wrote the book to help me deal with my own grief, stress and feelings of guilt that I was glad she had finally let g

Cover image of 'Tallulah tumour, friend or foe. A personal insight into a battle with a brain tumour'

Tallulah tumour, friend or foe. A personal insight into a battle with a brain tumour (2012)

Memoirs Publishing

Fiona Goldsby has emerged triumphant from the terrifying experience of suffering a serious brain tumour. She found very little written material was available to help her in her battle, so she has written Tallulah Tumour, Friend or Foe? to help others dealing with a similar diagnosis. It is intended to provide information about what the patient may expect, with hints and tips to deal with the various side effects. The information in the book will not only be helpful to patients but to caregivers and family members. And as you may guess from the title, there is plenty of humour as well. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Love for now'

Love for now (2012)

Impress Books

The sun has just popped out, after a heavy shower; the washing line a string of pearls. It's time to live. On Valentine s Day, 2006, Anthony Wilson was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a cancer of the lymphatic system. He was 42. In this journal of the days that followed he contemplates love, family and mortality alongside celebrations of Peter Osgood, Ivor Cutler and cooking chicken while listening to funk. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Riddance'

Riddance (2012)

Worple

On Valentine's Day, 2006, Anthony Wilson was formally diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a cancer of the lymphatic system. 'Beginning with what happened', the poems in Riddance chart the progress of his treatment for this disease, from initial diagnosis to the uncertain territory of remission. Even more essentially, they recover and celebrate all that is most fundamental and affirming about the act of living. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Living with cancer: endings and beginnings'

Living with cancer: endings and beginnings (2012)

Dorset County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Six people (two men, four women) who had recently been treated for cancer at Dorset County Hospital met with writer Rosie Jackson for some creative writing workshops in October 2012. This booklet is their personal response to the experience of being diagnosed with cancer and going through treatment and its aftermath.

Cover image of 'Table for one, Sir?'

Table for one, Sir? (2012)

Austin Macauley

In this deeply poignant and personal memoir, John Flint recounts the experience of his wife Patricia s diagnosis with cancer, her death, and his efforts to readjust to life afterwards. John uses his own experiences to explore some of the wider issues about how society responds to terminal illness, death, and widowhood. But, in a book that is touching, warm, and wise, John focuses on some of the realities of each stage from caring for a terminally ill loved one to learning to live as a widower. In doing so, John provides an insight into the real emotions and experiences of a carer and widower. He provides thoughts on the practicalities of what to expect from experiences such as the first Christmas as a widower, going on holiday alone, and the well-meant comments of others; and, in a life where the tears are only an eyelid away, he provides ideas on how to deal with them. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Mum's list. A mother's life lessons to the husband and sons she left behind'

Mum's list. A mother's life lessons to the husband and sons she left behind (2012)

Penguin

On her deathbed, Kate Greene's only concern was for her two little boys, Reef and Finn, and her loving husband, Singe. She knew she'd be leaving them behind very soon. Over her last few days, Kate created Mum's List. The couple talked and cried together as she wrote her thoughts and wishes down, trying to help the man she loved create the best life for their boys after she was gone. It wasn't the first time Singe and Kate had faced the spectre of death. Four years earlier, doctors discovered a large lump in baby Reef's abdomen. Kate, pregnant with Finn, was so distressed that she gave birth dangerously early. Both boys pulled through, but afterwards Kate received the diagnosis that every woman dreads (Publisher)

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