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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 192

Cover image of 'My journey'

My journey (2013)

Penguin

In July 2009, Jim Stynes was diagnosed with cancer and given less than a year to live. The diagnosis caught him by surprise - he was 42, healthy, fit - and he didn't have time for illness: he was director of a foundation for young people, president of Melbourne Football Club, father of two primary school-aged kids, husband of Sam. Knowing his odds weren't good, but with so much to lose, Jim put everything he had into trying to beat the disease. He was well equipped to beat the odds - he'd been getting the most out of himself in every aspect of life since his childhood in Dublin. Jim's ability to use mind over matter and his will to succeed gave him two extra years on the prognosis. He had more than 25 tumours removed from his brain and stomach, and defied expectations time and time again. This book is Jim's legacy. Unflinching in its detail, Jim talks about what he found out about himself when things were at their worst - about what really counts when you're stacking it all up. It's a moving, inspiring story of a life lived fearlessly. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Worms on parachutes. Mystical allies in my cancer survival'

Worms on parachutes. Mystical allies in my cancer survival (2013)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

I was diagnosed with Triple Negative Breast Cancer on the 15th June 2007. I remember that day so vividly. It will be ingrained in my memory forever as it is the day I felt my perfect little world crumble. I remember hearing those terrifying words, “I’m sorry it’s cancer” and falling to pieces. I hollered as my mind froze and my body went numb. I was frightened, felt incredibly vulnerable and my greatest fear stared me in the face. I could potentially die, and leave behind my two beautiful daughters and a husband who is also my best friend, and the person I love to have at my side. I’m pleased to report those initial feelings softened as time passed. Now it is important to share my story to give hope, encouragement and inspiration to others faced with a life-threatening illness. I believe that sharing stories helps to inspire those who are touched by cancer. You seek hope reassurance that treatments can be very successful today. Breast Cancer isn’t the only illness I have overcome. I had a near death experience in Africa as a child, I was an accident-prone youngster and the sickly one in my family. I was diagnosed with Hodgkin Disease, a cancer of the lymphatic system at 16, yes, I’m very greedy one cancer wasn’t enough. Fingers crossed cancer will leave me alone now. I will not give in! However, it is quite possible that radiation treatment for that cancer caused my breast cancer 20 years later. Yet from all the mishaps I experienced, I walk away truly blessed that people who entered my life as strangers ended up making the greatest impact on my life. What makes Worms On Parachutes special is that I was inspired to write after receiving outstanding medical care. Therefore, it deals with relationships from medical professionals to family and friends so openly and honestly. It is an insightful read that I believe will be helpful and supportive to anyone experiencing cancer today in whatever role you play. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Surviving and thriving. My encounter with cancer'

Surviving and thriving. My encounter with cancer (2013)

David Grant

This is a story about fighting the "inevitable". Diagnosed with a Grade 4 Glioblastoma Multiforme in 2005 with medical expectations of 12/15 months, I am living life to the full. Don't accept average survival stats, ask instead, "just what is possible". Good luck. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Expected death at 03:45. A love story'

Expected death at 03:45. A love story (2013)

Julia Dansie

Julia Dansie writes about her experiences of looking after an ex-partner and friend who had breast cancer. It is written as a diary covering 20 months during which the two central characters travel an extraordinary journey, unimagined at the time of inception.

Cover image of 'My left boob. A cancer diary'

My left boob. A cancer diary (2013)

Book Guild Publishing

Diagnosed with breast cancer in her fifties, award-winning actress and glamour girl-about-town Sally Farmiloe-Neville decided to keep a diary. This is the frank and honest account of her fight to beat the tumour within, retain as much of her left breast as possible - and carry on working meanwhile. Filled with helpful advice to fellow sufferers based on her own experiences, needle-phobic Sally documents her treatment as she goes through the horrors of chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy, helped by a healer, a hypnotherapist and a special diet. When her trademark 'big' hair falls out she reveals how she coped by getting ‘Crystal’, a long blonde NHS wig that wowed every man she met. Her family and friends - including many famous household names - are by her side throughout, but many of them have fought their own battles with the big C and Sally documents their stories, too. Always upbeat, never sorry for herself, this is the courageous tale of one woman's struggle to regain her health. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Living with cancer. The year when even the dog got cancer'

Living with cancer. The year when even the dog got cancer (2013)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

How do you live with cancer, day by day, month by month, year by year? With medical advances, this is what many of us are now doing. In the UK alone, by 2020, it is estimated 50% of people will experience cancer either as a patient or a carer. And this is being repeated all around the world. Living with cancer - The year when even the dog got cancer gives an inspirational insight into how one family dealt with four cases of cancer being treated at the same time over one year. Written as a memoir by the carer who can only watch and be supportive as her loved ones go through the various treatments and their side effects, it brings into reality the true emotional cost of "living with cancer". It does so with heart-warming honesty and a huge amount of humour. It will make you cry. It will make you giggle, but more than anything, it will give you hope. Living with Cancer - The Year When Even The Dog Got Cancer will show you that this frightening illness can be survived and the joy of life can go on. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'I felt a right one... and now I feel a right one again'

I felt a right one... and now I feel a right one again (2013)

Matador

“Whilst in the bath I lay back and take a look at my 'bigger than I would really like' body and focus on my chest. My G cup breasts are not difficult to miss, even with my poor eyesight, but what I see makes me sit up straight. It looks like my right nipple is 'not on straight'. I put my glasses on and have a really good look, then start to gently feel my whole right breast. I feel the left one for good measure and can definitely detect a lump on the right side...” This is the true story of Karen Tighe, an ordinary woman, and her journey through discovery, diagnosis, treatment and reconstruction. Amusing and thoughtfully written, it is particularly helpful in describing the physical, emotional and psychological processes that a patient can go through - and how that impacts upon their life, and that of their family. Karen's aim in writing the book was to make cancer less frightening and anyone who is either suffering from cancer, or knows someone who is, will find the book to be of great help. Karen Tighe is donating the profits from her book to St Luke's Hospice and Breast Cancer Care. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cellmates. Our lessons in cancer, life, love and loss'

Cellmates. Our lessons in cancer, life, love and loss (2013)

Saraband

I'm Rose. John and I shared nearly eight years of our lives together. For the last three years of our relationship cancer anchored us together. That's not as grim as it might sound. This is our story. A story of how two ordinary people live with the diagnosis, the check-ups, the disappointments, the relief, the questions, the answers, the operations, the recovery, the emergencies, the denial, the acceptance, the anger, the pain, the loss, the love, the fear, the frustration - and the happiness. Shortly before he died, John made Rose promise to share their story - to tell what they had learned, practically and emotionally, and convey the hope they found even in the darkest of times. He had discovered her hidden stash of letters and diary entries, which she'd been writing to keep herself sane, neither censoring nor intending them to be read. The result is an astonishing, searingly honest, real-time account that reveals our profound capacity for love and how the human spirit can endure the most harrowing of tests to emerge dauntless, flying free. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Gift of time'

Gift of time (2013)

Constable

An heartbreakingly honest and deeply moving memoir in the words of the son, his wife and his mother of her battle with cancer, from one of the UK's best loved travel writers. When his mother Joan was diagnosed with terminal cancer, Rory MacLean and his wife Katrin took her into their home. For five months, as their life fragmented and turned inward, they fought both to resist and to accept the inevitable. Each gave vent to their emotions in different ways, but all three kept a diary. Heartbreakingly honest and deeply moving, Gift of Time is the story of those days, in the words of a son, his wife and his mother. Woven together into a poignant meditation on life and death, they illuminate the courage and dignity of one woman who confronted what we all must face. Threaded through with wisdom and guilt, anger and acceptance, the story is punctuated by a family wedding and the hope of new life, by bin-bags of old letters and books rediscovered, by the end of winter and the first signs of spring. Powerful, raw and urgent, this slender volume is above all a celebration of life. Capturing every moment of beauty and pain it acknowledges that what survives all of us is love. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Mum's way'

Mum's way (2013)

Simon & Schuster UK

Angie and Ian were childhood sweethearts, Angie adored kids and, as one of eight children himself, Ian was only too happy to have as many as they could. After their marriage they had three sons in quick succession. But then, aged just thirty one, Angie was diagnosed with breast cancer and the couple had to accept they might not be able to have any more. Five years on, though, with Angie well again they went on to have five more. But in 2007, Angie had a shadow on her lung and it was the return of the original breast cancer she thought she had beaten. It seemed the disease had returned to tear their world apart again. Though Ian searched tirelessly for cures, Angie practised acceptance. She wouldn't live to see her children grow up. Raising eight children would be a big job for any couple; to raise them alone, without their mother, an almost Herculean feat. But this was exactly what Angie wanted Ian to be able to do. So in the last months of her life, Angie compiled a list of 'rules' to guide Ian in the future, and put him on an intensive training course, so he could learn all the skills he would need. She taught him how to make her special chicken curry, how to soothe away their hurts, pack their lunchboxes with all their favourites and do all the little things she'd done for them so unthinkingly. And Ian knew he wasn't just doing this for the children. He was doing it so his beloved wife could be comforted by knowing that he had the tools to bring their children up her way. Finally, inevitably, came the hardest task of all. Angie, the job done, had to find the courage to let them go, and Ian and the children the courage to carry on without her. (Publisher)

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