Publications directory

Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 7 days a week, 8am-8pm

The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 192

Cover image of 'Until further notice, I am alive'

Until further notice, I am alive (2014)

Granta Books

In 2008, Tom Lubbock was diagnosed with a brain tumour, and told he had only one or two years to live. In this remarkable record of those years, lived out in three-month intervals between scans, he examines the question of how to live with death in sight. As the tumour progressed, Tom engaged intensely and imaginatively with work, art, friends, and his wife and their young son, while trying to remain focused on the fact of his impending death. His tumour was located in the area of the brain associated with language, and he describes losing control over the spoken and written word and the resources he drew on to keep communicating; a struggle which brought him ever closer to the mysteries of the origin of speech. As the Independent's chief art critic, he was renowned for the clarity and unconventionality of his writing, and the same fierce intelligence permeates this extraordinary memoir. This is a book written by a man wholly engaged with life even as it ends. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The ripple effect: how a positive attitude and a caring community helped save my life'

The ripple effect: how a positive attitude and a caring community helped save my life (2014)

Self-published using iUniverse

The author, Steven Lewis, in superb life-long health, was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, a disease with a survival rate of only 5%. In spite of this, Steven and his wife struggled to achieve and deliberately maintain an extremely positive attitude. This choice started a "ripple effect" that created an exceptionally caring and upbeat community of family, relatives and friends and enabled this community to return even more positive energy to Steven. The story became even more intense when Steven endured a second bout of pancreatic cancer that metastasized to his liver. Surviving a second bout of pancreatic cancer is so rare that no statistics are kept. Today, Steven is cancer free, in excellent health and works out strenuously. Virtually all of us, at some point, will experience extreme life difficulties involving circumstances such as severe illness, injuries, accidents, divorce or natural disasters. A positive attitude can help us think clearly, be solution oriented and ultimately prevail. Whether Steven physically survived or not, an attitude of complaint and negativity would have shattered his emotional life and that of his family. Steven's choice was to stay positive and upbeat in spite of his situation. What would you have done? (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Cancer is my teacher'

Cancer is my teacher (2014)

Quartet Books

Every two minutes someone in the UK is diagnosed with cancer. Lucy O'Donnell was herself three years ago. Cancer is My Teacher is her story, describing unflinchingly how she has turned the disease into a positive experience - and how you can do the same. Lucy's approach is determined but disciplined, clinical but also holistic. By addressing the physical, emotional, and spiritual aspects of cancer, Lucy covers the whole spectrum of the disease - including how to tell the family, the dos and donts of communicating with a patient, the side-effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy - and gives practical advice on how to keep looking your best and even what to pack for surgery. Cancer is My Teacher offers guidance for anyone in the early stages of diagnosis, in treatment or trying to readjust afterwards. It also helps family and loved ones to understand what they're going through - and, above all, carries a message of hope for everyone touched by cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Dancing with cancer (and how I learnt a few new steps)'

Dancing with cancer (and how I learnt a few new steps) (2014)

O-Books (John Hunt Publishing)

The late Diana Brueton had never been ill and on being diagnosed with metastatic bowel cancer in August 2007 she stepped into a parallel world of waiting rooms, treatments, friends and family who supported - or fled - as life became both exquisitely precious and terrible. Dancing with Cancer is a human drama, a ride on the rollercoaster of hope and despair and, as the gradients became gentler, a journey through meditation and creativity to wisdom and acceptance. Diana was a gifted writer and artist who worked for the BBC, The Bristol Cancer Help Centre and as a teacher and art therapist. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The c list. Colons, clinics, chemo and (quite a lot of cake): how I survived bowel cancer'

The c list. Colons, clinics, chemo and (quite a lot of cake): how I survived bowel cancer (2014)

Watkins Publishing

When facing with advanced cancer, the first thing this author did was look for other books from long time survivors of stage 4 bowel cancer to give her something to hold on to. Finding none, she wrote her own. With a wicked, taboo-breaking sense of humour and a gift for practicality, she shares her experiences and the lists she made to gain some control over what quickly became an unpredictable life. Both funny and poignant, she vividly describes the absurd situations she finds herself in from a brutally flippant surgeon to dating after cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The diary of a mother, her son and his monster'

The diary of a mother, her son and his monster (2014)

Empire Publications

Caroline Burch experienced every parent's worst nightmare when her son Elliot was diagnosed with cancer when he was just six months old. To document her experiences she kept a diary detailing the ups and downs of her son's treatment and the emotional anguish of their situation from diagnosis to remission. Ten years later, and with Elliot happily recovered from the condition that threatened his life, Caroline looks back at the traumatic months when there appeared to be no end in sight to the misery. Caroline's story is proof that there is life after cancer and this book is a tribute to the tireless work of the individuals who help parents and their children emerge from their nightmare. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'I've been there. 50 tips on coping with lymphoma'

I've been there. 50 tips on coping with lymphoma (2014)

Tips for coping with lymphoma from a patient.

Cover image of 'Probably nothing. A diary of not-your-average nine months'

Probably nothing. A diary of not-your-average nine months (2014)

Viking

A moving, funny and inspiring graphic memoir by a woman who discovered she had cancer whilst she was pregnant: 'I am glad. And then sad. (But) Mum's bought me a furry snood. 'Ooh, lovely!'' At 31, Matilda Tristram was 17 weeks pregnant and looking forward to having her first baby. Then she discovered she had cancer. This touching and hilarious graphic memoir, which is never morose or self-pitying, starts at the moment Matilda was diagnosed and ends when her course of chemotherapy finishes in October 2013. Recording the awkward conversations, the highs and lows of treatment, the mixed blessings of receiving 'Get Well' cards, and the reality of still having to queue too long for croissants, Matilda captures her experiences with characteristic style and warmth. Along the way she cherishes the small details of life, and learns not to sweat the big things. Her beautiful and boisterous son was born without complications and is reliably keeping her up most nights. Charming, witty and uplifting - this unique and beautifully illustrated book will leave you cherishing the good things in life, and ready to face your own challenges. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Travels with Cookie. Narrowboat cruising with a cat'

Travels with Cookie. Narrowboat cruising with a cat (2014)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Between 2004 and 2006, David Thomas experienced a series of disasters in his life, culminating in being told that he only had a short time left to live. Rather than sinking into despair as many people would, he decided to fulfil his lifelong dream of living on a canal boat, while he still could. So he bought a narrowboat, LadyRiverMouse (an anagram of 'Live Your Dreams') with a view to spending the rest of his limited life cruising the canals and rivers of England. Naturally, he had to take the love of his life with him – a rather bad-tempered fluffy white prima donna of a cat called Cookie. Cookie was an indoor cat who had rarely been outside, never mind living on a boat, where according to David dogs are usually the pets of choice. Would it work out? David didn't know, but as he put it, “I wasn't going anywhere without my beloved Cookie”. The remainder of the book is an account of the few years David spent travelling through the waterways of his native land. Many people live on boats; few cruise as extensively as David did – to London, along the Thames, up to Wales, then tackling the wild and often desolate rivers of North West England. A beginner to boating when he started, David learned much as time went on, mainly by having numerous – and often hair-raising - adventures. So did Cookie, who contrived to get lost, fall in the water on a number of occasions, and generally use up most of her cat's nine lives. Finally David met Helen, a helicopter instructor, writer, and – most importantly – cat lover. They fell in love, and David's life began to change yet again, leading to the eventual sale of LadyRiverMouse and a new life in the Peak District for David and Cookie. David knows about boating, has an eye for detail, and is also an astute observer of his fellow men and women, both on and off the waterways. Therefore this book will clearly be of interest to those who have ever travelled on the canals or done any other boating, anyone who loves travel of any type, or simply the armchair traveller who enjoys reading about others' adventures. But “Travels With Cookie” is more than just another boating or travel book. It is a tale of bereavement and divorce, of terminal illness and despair, and finally of romance, a seemingly miraculous cure, and a new life. Hence it should appeal to anyone who likes human interest stories of any type. And of course – as Cookie herself would tell you if she could speak - it i

Cover image of 'Laryngectomy is not a tragedy. An introduction to pharyngeal speech'

Laryngectomy is not a tragedy. An introduction to pharyngeal speech (2013)

Cancer Laryngectomee Trust

This updated edition contains the original chapters written by Sydney Norgate in 1989 plus additional material by Dr Nicola Oswald on current speech methods and future developments. It will provide help and encouragement to all laryngectomy patients and their families. It is full of practical advice and information, as well as reassurance. The author, who had himself had his larynx removed, wrote from personal experience of the problems caused by the loss of normal speech, and describes the method of learning to use substitute pharyngeal speech. Written in a straightforward, humorous style and illustrated with cartoons 'Laryngectomy is not a Tragedy' has proved to be a valuable source of advice and inspiration to all those who face this operation. (Publisher)

Sorry, no publications found.
Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 7 days a week, 8am-8pm