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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 342

Cover image of 'Pretty sick. The beauty guide for woman with cancer. How to look your best when you feel your worst'

Pretty sick. The beauty guide for woman with cancer. How to look your best when you feel your worst (2017)

Piatkus (Little, Brown Book Group)

The ultimate resource to looking your best during and after cancer treatment, from a veteran beauty industry insider. Like many women who receive the shattering diagnosis of cancer, Caitlin Kiernan was concerned about her health and her future, but also about how the treatment would affect how she felt and looked - would she lose her hair? Would she lose her nails? How would she look after a double mastectomy? But unlike other women who battle cancer, Kiernan has spent her entire career as a beauty editor, beauty director (most recently for Life & Style Weekly), and now beauty producer. As someone who works in the public eye and in the fashion industry, Kiernan had to quickly learn how to look her best even when she was feeling her worst. So she called on her list of extensive contacts and beauty insiders - from hair professionals to top medical doctors (at institutions like Memorial Sloan Kettering and Mt Sinai Hospital) to style mavens and even celebrities (including Wendy Williams and Hoda Kotb) - to gather the best and most useful beauty tips for cancer treatment. The result is Pretty Sick: the ultimate guide to beauty during (and after) cancer treatment, covering skin care, hair care (and wig shopping), nail care, makeup, an explanation of breast cancer surgical options, style advice for life post mastectomy, and much, much more. Illustrated with charming line drawings and peppered with advice from celebrities and cancer survivors, Pretty Sick will be a welcome and trusted resource during treatment, helping women to look their best even when they don't feel their best. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'You just hear that word cancer and you just can’t take it'

You just hear that word cancer and you just can’t take it (2017)

Austin Macauley

Written as a diary, Lisa Primrose goes through the lows and highs of her experiences after being diagnosed with cancer. She takes the reader on an emotional rollercoaster: always positive but not afraid to give the reader a ‘warts and all' description of events. Her interactions with the Health Service are invariably good but she only gets the best out of the system by having a positive attitude to her condition no matter how physically disabling the symptoms are. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'Having a bad hair day'

Having a bad hair day (2017)

Clare C Davison

“Tomorrow, you will feel a little bit better.” From a loving childhood, belonging to a large family with no history of breast cancer, Clare was alarmed at age 42 to accidentally discover she had the disease. As a self-employed single mum, Clare documents her memoirs of personal experience and knowledge of the cruel decisions made for the aggressive treatments and hair loss ahead. With an inner strength of humour, Clare’s first book includes her lunch arrangements with Peter Andre, a cake nationally released in her honour, an experience of public speaking, media attention and continued fundraising with a moving excerpt from her son. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A most clarifying battle: the spirit and cancer'

A most clarifying battle: the spirit and cancer (2017)

O-Books (John Hunt Publishing)

Part resource and part memoir, this is the work of an extraordinarily courageous and shining figure who finished her manuscript before her illness finally claimed her. A Most Clarifying Battle provides a foundation for the reader to understand the experiential issues involved in living and dying with a cancer diagnosis and suggests simple exercises that can be used to build spiritual muscle and enhance quality of life. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Living with cancer. A step-by-step guide for coping medically and emotionally with a serious diagnosis'

Living with cancer. A step-by-step guide for coping medically and emotionally with a serious diagnosis (2017)

Johns Hopkins University Press

The prospect of entering treatment is overwhelming for anyone facing a diagnosis of cancer. While patients have access to a vast amount of medical information online, this advice is often unreliable or confusing. In Living with Cancer, Drs. Vicki A. Jackson and David P. Ryan have crafted the first step-by-step guide aimed at helping people with this life-defining disease grasp what’s happening to them while coping physically and emotionally with cancer treatment. An empathetic resource full of relatable patient stories, this book teaches patients and caregivers how to ask the right questions to get the best possible care―beginning at the moment of diagnosis. Drs. Jackson and Ryan explain how to work with a team of doctors and nurse practitioners to minimize symptoms and side effects while living as fully as possible in the face of cancer. They relay important information about understanding prognosis, and they translate what doctors mean when they describe tests, treatments, and medical procedures. Finally, they discuss hospice care and answer questions about continuing treatment and managing the final phase of life. Based on new research and a groundbreaking program in which patients are treated with palliative care―along with the best cancer care―during the course of their illness, this honest and caring book provides the right advice to use at the right time throughout a journey with cancer. It allows a person with cancer to concentrate on living the best life possible, despite an uncertain future. Patients at every stage will find Living with Cancer a comprehensive, thoughtful, and accessible guide for navigating the illness and its treatment. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Run for your life. How one woman ran circles around breast cancer'

Run for your life. How one woman ran circles around breast cancer (2017)

Pitch Publishing Ltd

Running has been many things to Jenny Baker – a space to achieve new things, a way to keep fit and healthy, and a source of friendship and community. She had planned a year of running to celebrate her birthday; instead Jenny was hit with a bombshell which rocked her life when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. She had one question for her oncologist: can I keep running? It gave her a sense of identity through her chemotherapy, while her treatment was stripping away everything that was important to her. Run for Your Life is the story of how she kept running to help her beat cancer, and how it helped her get her life back on track after an intensive spell of treatment and a turbulent time in her life. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Dolly daydreamer'

Dolly daydreamer (2017)

Austin Macauley

Rachel and Simon have been married for a long time. They are both parents and grandparents. They love Portugal, but life isn’t as perfect as it appears on the surface. Rachel had breast cancer and as time goes on, family circumstances threaten the very fabric of the family. Is their family unit strong enough to survive what the future has in store for Rachel, Simon and the rest of their family? (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The finch in my brain'

The finch in my brain (2017)

Hodder & Stoughton

When film producer Martino Sclavi began experiencing intense headaches, he attributed them to his frenetic lifestyle. As it turned out, he had grade 4 brain cancer and was given 18 months to live. After undergoing brain surgery - while awake - Martino found he had lost the ability to recognise words. His response was to close his eyes and begin to move his fingers across the keyboard to write this, an account of life before diagnosis and since. Defying all predictions Martino is still very much alive, words read out to him by the monotone of a computerised voice he calls Alex. But he must now live in a new way. This book - that he has written but cannot read - charts the effects of his experience: on his relationship with his young son, his marriage, his work and with himself. In the wake of his illness, everything must be reconfigured and Martino is made to question the habits, dreams and beliefs of his old life and confront the present. What he finds is strange and beautiful. Searching for the words between life and death, Sclavi shows that with determination and a subtle, persistent sense of humour, it is possible to change the story of our lives. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Welcome to the Pink Ladies Club. Fighting breast cancer and finding friends'

Welcome to the Pink Ladies Club. Fighting breast cancer and finding friends (2017)

Independently published

Karen Bates was diagnosed with breast cancer after a routine screening. In this frank and heartfelt memoir, she shares her story and tips for surviving breast cancer, chemotherapy and reconstruction surgery. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Benny's hat'

Benny's hat (2017)

Pomelo Pip

Benny’s Hat follows Friz’s story from when she first learns of her brother’s illness, right through to his death and beyond. With its realistic but hopeful and gentle tone, readers will see that it is normal to feel a whole range of emotions –sad, worried, confused, angry and happy, even during the darkest of times. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Cancer. A beginner's guide'

Cancer. A beginner's guide (2017)

Oneworld Publications

Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, and one of the most feared diagnoses a patient can face. The number of new cases is expected to rise by 70% over the next two decades, but few of us understand what it is, how it affects the body or what can be done to treat and even prevent it. In this illuminating introduction, Dr Paul Scotting explains the science behind the disease and explores the factors that can increase our risk of developing cancer.  Fully revised and updated, Cancer: A Beginner’s Guide details the latest breakthroughs, cutting-edge developments and promising new strategies that will help us combat and cure cancer in the future. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Inside the wave'

Inside the wave (2017)

Bloodaxe Books

To be alive is to be inside the wave, always travelling until it breaks and is gone. These poems are concerned with the borderline between the living and the dead - the underworld and the human living world - and the exquisitely intense being of both. They possess a spare, eloquent lyricism as they explore the bliss and anguish of the voyage. Inside the Wave, Helen Dunmore's tenth and final book of poetry. Her final poem, 'Hold out your arms', written shortly before her death and not included in the first printing of Inside the Wave, has now been added to the reprint. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'This beautiful life'

This beautiful life (2017)

Hodder & Stoughton

Abi has been given the second chance she never expected, and now she's trying to get her life - and her family - back on track after facing the worst [colon cancer]. But it's hard to trust in happiness again, and reconnecting with her husband John proves more challenging than she thought. Can you really go back to 'normal' after thinking you're going to lose one another? With Abi's son Seb struggling with a secret of his own, the three of them are in danger of falling apart just when they need each other most. But how do you pick up the pieces of a family still suffering emotional shockwaves? And can Abi bring the people she loves most in the world back together again... before it's too late? (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Laughing at cancer. How to heal with love, laughter and mindfulness'

Laughing at cancer. How to heal with love, laughter and mindfulness (2017)

Brolga Publishing Pty

Laughing at cancer is a unique book based on a series of journals following the author's shock diagnosis of bowel cancer at 43. Brimming with humour, insight and sensitivity, it explores how we talk about and view illness, and how changing your mindset can do wonders on the journey to health. Through explanations of mindful healing techniques and the power of laughter, Laughing at cancer is both a touching memoir and powerful healing guide for anyone undergoing a significant health or life challenge, and not specifically cancer. Wellbeing and mindfulness healing techniques at the conclusion of each chapter empower readers and provide strategies to enhance resilience - a factor often diminished by ill health. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Connecting with cancer. Living with and beyond cancer'

Connecting with cancer. Living with and beyond cancer (2017)

Melrose Books

Surgeon: You’ve got cancer, but we can keep you going for a few months, or maybe a few years. Me: Okay, which is it, months or years? Surgeon: Silence. Me: Will it kill me? Surgeon: Yes, it probably will. That was when my head went into overdrive and I lost the plot. Hearing that you have cancer is a life-changing moment. Connecting with Cancer tells the stories of different people affected by different cancers: how their lives were changed, how they found an inner strength, how they found hope and a life after cancer. Each story is personal and sometimes very intimate; in the pages of this book, you will learn what cancer feels like. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The owl at the window. A memoir of loss and hope'

The owl at the window. A memoir of loss and hope (2017)

Coronet (Hodder & Stoughton)

Award-winning TV comedy writer Carl Gorham's account of his bereavement is by turns deeply moving and darkly humorous. Part love story, part widower's diary, part tales of single parenting, it tells of his wife's cancer, her premature death and his attempts to rebuild his life afterwards with his six -year old daughter. Realised in a series of vivid snapshots, it takes the reader on an extraordinary journey from Oxford to Australia, from Norfolk to Hong Kong through fear, despair, pain and anger to hope, laughter and renewal. The Owl at the Window is a fresh and original exploration of what it means to lose a partner in your forties, and how Carl learned to live again. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cancer was my companion. A memoir'

Cancer was my companion. A memoir (2017)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

This is the story of a man coming to terms with his own mortality. Originally diagnosed with colon cancer, he fought to survive the treatment, only to find that the disease had spread to his liver. Further surgery saved his life again. It was an experience that helped him realise what he thought he already knew, but really didn’t: that he could die. David I Brown writes with both sensitivity and raging anger. It is an unusual mixture of styles with plenty of black humour peppered in between. Drawing on his keen observations, Brown explains the medical processes he underwent from diagnosis through treatment to recovery and provides us with a harsh but beautifully fierce – almost surreal – understanding of his emotional journey. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The grandad grand prix'

The grandad grand prix (2017)

North Staffordshire Press

Flo has two of the most fun and competitive grandads in the world who can never resist the chance to get one over on the other. That is until Flo is faced with some devastating news when one of her grandads is diagnosed with a serious illness. Although her world is turned upside down, Flo continues to be inspired by her grandad whose sheer will, determination and positive attitude will not be diminished no matter what. So join Flo as she embarks on an emotional roller coaster as she laughs, cries, makes new friends and discovers what it truly means to never, ever give up. The Grandad Grand Prix is a fictional story inspired by true events and a must read for all age groups. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'We own the sky'

We own the sky (2017)

Trapeze (Orion)

Rob Coates can't believe his luck. There is Anna, his incredible wife, and most precious of all, Jack, their son, who makes every day an extraordinary adventure. Rob feels like he's won the lottery of life. Or rather - he did. Until the day it all changes when Anna becomes convinced there is something wrong with Jack. Now Rob sleepwalks through his days, unable to bridge the gulf that separates him from his wife, his son and the business of living. But he's determined to come to terms with what’s happened-and find a way back to life, and forgiveness. We Own the Sky will resonate with anyone who has ever suffered loss or experienced great love. Luke Allnutt shows that the journey from hope to despair and back is never as simple as we think, and that even the most thoroughly broken heart can learn to beat again. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'All to live for. Fighting cancer. Finding hope.'

All to live for. Fighting cancer. Finding hope. (2017)

Headline

In 2005 Emma Hannigan was 32, happily married to her long-time love, with two young children. Her world was shattered when she discovered that she had the rare gene BRCA1, meaning a 50% chance of developing ovarian cancer and an 85% chance of breast cancer. To reduce the risk, Emma had a double mastectomy and both ovaries removed, but in 2007 received the news that cancer had struck anyway. Twelve years later, Emma is battling cancer for the tenth time. With warmth and wisdom, she shares her journey and her advice on everything from skincare and hair loss to how to keep a sense of humour through it all. All to Live For is a story of one woman's determination not to let cancer win; a story of strength and inspiration, hope and love. And of never giving up. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Chemo summer. An uplifting breast cancer experience'

Chemo summer. An uplifting breast cancer experience (2017)

Austin Macauley

In Chemo Summer Jane Hoggar takes the reader through a light-hearted and informative account of her discovery of breast cancer and its cure. Cancer of any description has the capacity to chill those it affects and their loved ones. But for Jane Hoggar early discovery and diagnosis provided for a satisfactory resolution. And it's these small details that might well help people in a similar situation. For example, Jane did not discover a lump, which is the usual thing in breast cancer, but a sag' when she raised her arms and it was her insistence that something was wrong that resulted in a vital early medical diagnosis. All the side issues are covered in the book, effects of chemo and radiotherapy, hair loss and wigs, changes in diet and exercise, making Chemo Summer a valuable and engaging look into a serious and often frightening subject. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Prostate cancer. Asking the right questions'

Prostate cancer. Asking the right questions (2017)

Fertile Ground Press

During my journey with prostate cancer, I learned that the medical community was selling and I was buying. With prostate cancer you are a consumer, and it is essential that you are aware of the following: 1. Prostate cancer is not just a disease; it is big business. 2. There is no single preferred treatment endorsed by the medical community. 3. There are new lower risk treatments and diagnostic capabilities that many doctors are unaware of or ignore. 4. You must be prepared to ask the right questions to increase your chance of having a good outcome. There are no easy answers when it comes to prostate cancer, but asking informed questions will help light your way, and hopefully either affirm your choices or lead you to a good decision. Read the book, use the prostate cancer check list as a guide, and become your own advocate. Remember, your doctors and your friends will not live with the consequences of your treatment. This burden will be born by you and you alone. Be sure to ask the right questions before selecting a form of treatment. (Author)

Cover image of 'The bright hour. A memoir of living and dying'

The bright hour. A memoir of living and dying (2017)

The Text Publishing Company (UK) Ltd

In January 2015 Nina was diagnosed with breast cancer, and it metastasised later that year. She was thirty-eight years old; her mother had died only a few months earlier from multiple myeloma. Nina Riggs grew up in a contemplative family: her great-great-great-grandfather was Ralph Waldo Emerson, and she was raised to turn to his essays for 'guidance, inspiration, and something to push against'. THE BRIGHT HOUR is Nina's intimate, unflinching account of 'living with death in the room'. She tells her story in a series of absurd, poignant and often hilarious vignettes drawn from a life that has 'no real future or arc left to it, yet still goes on as if it does'. This unforgettable memoir leads the reader into the innermost chambers of the writer's life: into the mind and heart, the work and home and family, of a young woman alternately seeking to make peace with and raging against the reality of her approaching death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Love, light and mermaid tails. One woman's healing journey back to wholeness through stage four cancer'

Love, light and mermaid tails. One woman's healing journey back to wholeness through stage four cancer (2017)

Fi Munro

In January 2016, at the age of 30, Fi Munro was diagnosed with non-genetic stage four ovarian cancer. In that moment, after months of pain, tests and assurances that it was ‘nothing to worry about’, her instincts were proved right and her worst fears were realised. In the months that followed, understanding her diagnosis, recovery and health became her full-time job. Using her expertise as a researcher she dedicated her time to understanding everything she could about her diagnosis and subsequent prognosis. In this honest, open and often tear-jerking account of her journey back to wholeness, Fi openly shares her story from diagnosis with stage four ‘terminal’ cancer to living an incredible, healthy life full of joy and laughter. This book is a guide for anyone, not just those with cancer, who wants to embrace a happier, healthier and more caring approach to their life. May it bring you hope, peace and, above all, joy. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Big tree is sick'

Big tree is sick (2017)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

Snibbles and Big Tree are best friends! They have always hung out together, and Snibbles loves Big Tree very much. When Big Tree unexpectedly falls ill with woodworm, Snibbles is very upset and angry. The illness is a very bad one and Big Tree does not feel well and doesn't want to play for a long time. Poor Snibbles! He wants Big Tree to get better, but he feels as if there is nothing he can do. What can Snibbles and his friends do to help Big Tree through his treatment and recovery? This beautifully illustrated storybook describes the anger and emotion that many children encounter when a close relative or friend is diagnosed with a long-term illness, such as cancer. The story of Big Tree depicts how things are often out of your control and sets out effective strategies for dealing with these emotions. This story features loveable characters and vivid illustrations, as well as activities for children aged 5+ to complete with their parents or professionals in times of illness and loss. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Going on the turn. A memoir'

Going on the turn. A memoir (2017)

Weidenfeld and Nicholson

Danny Baker's third volume of memoirs barrels along at the same cracking pace as its predecessors, the bestselling Going to Sea in a Sieve (the inspiration for the major TV series Cradle to Grave and subsequent nationwide tour) and Going off Alarming. With his trademark exuberance, he recalls the years which included six years' involvement in the massive TV hit TFI Friday ('piling it up with hellzapoppin' ideas') - during which time he stalked John Cleese in New York, entertained David Bowie and Paul McCartney, bizarrely reunites with Sir Michael Caine, gets befriended by Peter O'Toole and becomes a member of Led Zeppelin for 35 minutes. However, the tales are not reliant on celebrity alone, and the book comes packed with the usual quota of Baker family jewels, including Spud's attitude to doctors, Danny's trip to Amsterdam to get stoned for the first time (he fails), getting caught up in football rioting, and the now infamous 'kaboom' of an outburst following his despatch from BBC London. And then there's the cancer. Spoiler alert: this is the one in which he almost dies. Further spoiler alert: he doesn't. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Fast facts: Prostate cancer'

Fast facts: Prostate cancer (2017)

Health Press

Prostate cancer is a fast-changing field, and recent advances have significantly improved both the survival and quality of life of many men diagnosed with the disease. As well as providing comprehensive information on the diagnosis, staging and management of the disease, the eighth edition of this ever-popular handbook is an invaluable update on new developments, including: evidence for the debate surrounding PSA screening; a better understanding of molecular and genetic advances; the latest methods of delivering radiotherapy; new drug treatments for castrate-resistant prostate cancer; and survivorship issues. This superbly illustrated handbook is a practical resource for all those who provide support and care for men with prostate cancer - including GPs, nurses and allied health professionals - as well as a refreshingly readable source of information for patients wanting to know more about their condition and its treatment. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The essential guide to skin cancer'

The essential guide to skin cancer (2017)

Need2Know

Each year we are all warned about the dangers of UVA rays and how important it is to protect ourselves from the damaging effects they have on our skin. Up to 90% of skin cancer could be prevented if we were more aware of sun safety issues. This guide aims to provide expert advice and the latest research on sun safety and the treatment of skin cancer. There are chapters on how to use sunscreen, how a diagnosis of skin cancer is made and ways the skin can be treated during and after cancer. Subjects included are the different types of skin cancer, risk factors, the emotional effects of skin cancer and aftercare, plus up-to-date, straightforward information on sunscreen, sun beds and treatments. There are also lots of practical tips for staying safe in the sun. Whether you have just been diagnosed as having sun damaged skin or want advice on protecting yourself and your family in the sun, this guide provides the essential information. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The essential guide to breast cancer'

The essential guide to breast cancer (2017)

Need2Know

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in the UK; there are approximately 45,000 new cases every year. A new diagnosis can be very frightening and many people will have no prior knowledge of the disease. This book is for women and their families who are looking for a comprehensive but plain language guide to breast cancer and its treatments. Many people find that doctors, although highly qualified and well meaning, can forget how little the layperson knows about medical procedures and terminology. Starting with the basics, this guide will look at what breast cancer is and how it’s diagnosed, right through to support options, the treatment available and how to care for your carers. The emotional after-effects of being a survivor are also covered in detail. Written by a survivor of breast cancer and peer reviewed by a breast cancer specialist, this book will provide everything women need to know about breast care, being diagnosed with breast cancer and the road to recovery. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer-fighting kitchen. Nourishing, big-flavor recipes for cancer treatment and recovery'

The cancer-fighting kitchen. Nourishing, big-flavor recipes for cancer treatment and recovery (2017)

Ten Speed Press

This new and revised edition of the IACP award-winning cookbook brings the healing power of delicious, nutritious foods to those whose hearts and bodies crave a revitalizing meal, through 150 new and updated recipes. Featuring science-based, nutrient-rich recipes that are easy to prepare and designed to give patients a much-needed boost by stimulating appetite and addressing treatment side effects including fatigue, nausea, dehydration, mouth and throat soreness, taste bud changes, and weight loss. A step-by-step guide helps patients nutritionally prepare for all phases of treatment, and a full nutritional analysis accompanies each recipe. This remarkable resource teaches patients and caregivers how to use readily available powerhouse ingredients to build a symptom- and cancer-fighting culinary toolkit. Blending fantastic taste and meticulous science, these recipes for soups, vegetable dishes, proteins, and sweet and savory snacks are rich in the nutrients, minerals, and phytochemicals that help patients thrive during treatment. This second edition also includes a dozen new recipes--many of which are simpler and less complicated, for cancer patients to prepare on their low days--as well as a list of cancer-fighting foods that can be incorporated into everyday life without stepping behind the stove. Rebecca has also revised the text with the most up-to-date scientific research and includes a section on how friends and family can build a culinary support team. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Storm in a D cup! One woman’s journey through breast cancer'

Storm in a D cup! One woman’s journey through breast cancer (2017)

Debbie Paton Publishing

Storm in a D Cup! is a blow-by-blow account of Debbie Paton's journey through breast cancer. It is a candid account of the year between her initial diagnosis and her full recovery. When she was first diagnosed, Debbie wrote notes in a diary, but her daughter Georgia dragged her into the 21st century by convincing her to write a blog that could be shared with a wider audience. The blog soon became Debbie's cathartic writing. It gave her the freedom to express the rollercoaster of emotions as they happened, the good, the bad and the irrational. She shared her entries on social media for her friends and family to follow – it took the pressure off endless update phone calls! This is a no holds barred account of the mix of emotions, the highs and lows of the journey. It is not about doom and gloom, but rather the realities of the journey and the experiences Debbie had along the way. It is at times poignant and highly sensitive, at others, filled with laughter and fun. It was a year that shaped her life into something different. It is Debbie’s hope that her experiences can help others by alleviating some of the fear surrounding a breast cancer diagnosis. If she could have read a similar blog before starting her own journey, Debbie feels certain she would’ve been far less fearful of what lay ahead. Yes, everyone's path is different, but there are elements of her experience that will resonate with others in the same position. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'With the end in mind. Dying, death and wisdom in an age of denial'

With the end in mind. Dying, death and wisdom in an age of denial (2017)

William Collins

In this unprecedented book, palliative medicine pioneer Dr Kathryn Mannix explores the biggest taboo in our society and the only certainty we all share: death. Told through a series of beautifully crafted stories taken from nearly four decades of clinical practice, her book answers the most intimate questions about the process of dying with touching honesty and humanity. She makes a compelling case for the therapeutic power of approaching death not with trepidation but with openness, clarity and understanding. With the End in Mind is a book for us all: the grieving and bereaved, ill and healthy. Open these pages and you will find stories about people who are like you, and like people you know and love. You will meet Holly, who danced her last day away; Eric, the retired head teacher who, even with Motor Neurone Disease, gets things done; loving, tender-hearted Nelly and Joe, each living a lonely lie to save their beloved from distress; and Sylvie, 19, dying of leukaemia, sewing a cushion for her mum to hug by the fire after she has died. These are just four of the book’s thirty-odd stories of normal humans, dying normal human deaths. They show how the dying embrace living not because they are unusual or brave, but because that’s what humans do. By turns touching, tragic, at times funny and always wise, they offer us illumination, models for action, and hope. Read this book and you’ll be better prepared for life as well as death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Making peace with the end of life. A clear and comforting guide to help you live well to the last'

Making peace with the end of life. A clear and comforting guide to help you live well to the last (2017)

Creative Pumpkin Publishing

From GP and hospice doctor Patrick Fitzgerald and bestselling author Sarah Rayner (Making Friends with Anxiety, One Moment, One Morning) comes a warm and wise companion to help support you and those caring for you in the last months, weeks and days of life. From the shock of diagnosis, through treatment options and symptom control to the process of dying itself, Making Peace with the End of Life tackles these sensitive issues with compassion and honesty. Full of practical advice and important contact information, it will also help to demystify how the NHS and Social Services work, so you can access the best support more easily. And, drawing on Patrick’s extensive clinical experience, it also looks at how communicating your wishes to those involved in your care can give a feeling of safety and control over whatever happens in the future. There are tips on self-nurturing using diet, light exercise and alternative therapies, plus guidance on how to care for your own mental health – including advice for carers. And for those who are anxious about what lies ahead, patient stories and quotes from those who’ve been there help to explain what to expect, thereby easing worry and panic so you feel less alone. Offset by Sarah’s joyful illustrations, the result is a clear and compassionate guide that aims to make these complex and distressing issues less confusing and overwhelming, so each individual can live the life they have left with a greater sense of comfort and peace. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Dear cancer, love Victoria: a mum’s diary of hope'

Dear cancer, love Victoria: a mum’s diary of hope (2017)

Trapeze (Orion)

Renowned as a much-loved and highly respected BBC journalist, Victoria Derbyshire has spent 20 years finding the human story behind the headlines. In 2015 she found herself at the heart of the news, with a devastating breast cancer diagnosis. With honesty and openness, she decided to live out her treatment and recovery in the spotlight in a series of video diaries that encouraged thousands to seek diagnosis and help. Victoria has kept a diary since she was nine years old and in DEAR CANCER, LOVE VICTORIA she shares her day to day experiences of life following her diagnosis and coming to terms with a future that wasn't planned. From the moment she woke up to find her right breast had collapsed, to telling her partner and children, through to mastectomy and chemotherapy. From wearing a wig to work and hiding it from her colleagues, to the relief and joy of finishing treatment before immediately flying to Glasgow to present a debate on the European Referendum. By sharing her story, she became the person that mums, daughters, sisters, husbands, boyfriends and family members contacted to thank as they tried to find ways to cope with their own and their loved ones' prognosis, and needed to know that they were not alone. Victoria's story is an affecting and at times heart-breaking one but it is so often laugh-out-loud too. Moving, wonderfully heartwarming and ultimately uplifting, this is a powerful account of a brave struggle told with honesty, courage and emotion that gives strength to anyone touched by cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'There is no good card for this: what to say and do when life is scary, awful, and unfair to people you love'

There is no good card for this: what to say and do when life is scary, awful, and unfair to people you love (2017)

HarperOne

The creator of the viral hit "Empathy Cards" teams up with a compassion expert to produce a visually stunning and groundbreaking illustrated guide to help you increase your emotional intelligence and learn how to offer comfort and support when someone you know is in pain. When someone you know is hurting, you want to let her know that you care. But many people don’t know what words to use—or are afraid of saying or doing the wrong thing. This thoughtful, instructive guide, from empathy expert Dr. Kelsey Crowe and greeting card maverick Emily McDowell, blends well-researched, actionable advice with the no-nonsense humor and the signature illustration style of McDowell's immensely popular Empathy Cards, to help you feel confident in connecting with anyone experiencing grief, loss, illness, or any other difficult situation. Written in a how-to, relatable, we’ve-all-been-that-deer-in-the-headlights kind of way, There Is No Good Card for This isn’t a spiritual treatise on how to make you a better person or a scientific argument about why compassion matters. It is a helpful illustrated guide to effective compassion that takes you, step by step by step, past the paralysis of thinking about someone in a difficult time to actually doing something (or nothing) with good judgment instead of fear. There Is No Good Card for This features workbook exercises, sample dialogs, and real-life examples from Dr. Crowe’s research, including her popular "Empathy Bootcamps" that give people tools for building relationships when it really counts. Whether it’s a coworker whose mother has died, a neighbor whose husband has been in a car accident, or a friend who is seriously ill, There Is No Good Card for This teaches you how to be the best friend you can be to someone in need. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Hug everyone you know: a year of community, courage, and cancer'

Hug everyone you know: a year of community, courage, and cancer (2017)

She Writes Press

Antoinette Martin believed herself to be a healthy and sturdy woman--that is, until she received a Stage 1 breast cancer diagnosis. Cancer is scary enough for the brave, but for a wimp like Martin, it was downright terrifying. Martin had to swallow waves of nausea at the thought of her body being poisoned, and frequently fainted during blood draws and infusions. To add to her terror, cancer suddenly seemed to be all around her. In the months following her diagnosis, a colleague succumbed to cancer, and five of her friends were also diagnosed. Though tempted, Martin knew she could not hide in bed for ten months. She had a devoted husband, daughters, and a tribe of friends and relations. Along with work responsibilities, there were graduations, anniversaries, and roller derby bouts to attend, not to mention a house to sell and a summer of beach-bumming to enjoy. In order to harness support without scaring herself or anyone else, she journaled her experiences and began to e-mail the people who loved her--the people she called My Everyone. She kept them informed and reminded all to 'hug everyone you know' at every opportunity. Reading the responses became her calming strategy. Ultimately, with the help of her community, Martin found the courage within herself to face cancer with perseverance and humor. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Tommy v cancer.  One man's battle against the big C'

Tommy v cancer. One man's battle against the big C (2017)

Independently published

On Thursday, 10th of March 2016, I returned home from a hospital appointment and broke the news to my wife and children. I had throat cancer. Stage four. Inoperable. Desperately needing some way to make sense of my situation, I set up a blog to chart my battle against the disease. I hoped it would allow me to understand more about this thing inside me, and what I would have to go through in terms of treatment to try to eradicate it. I also thought it might help other people who found themselves in similar circumstances. I made a promise to my readers to be open and honest all the way. I wouldn't hold anything back, no matter how unpleasant. Now, over a year later, I have adapted that blog into this book. It details my journey from when I first realised that something was wrong, through the intense courses of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, to where I am today. To say that journey was difficult is a vast understatement. The side effects of my treatment utterly kicked my arse, causing me to lose over half my bodyweight and fall seriously ill with double pneumonia and sepsis. Totally unresponsive, I was rushed into intensive care where the doctors told my family that, if they couldn't stabilise me, I had approximately two hours left to live. One option was to put me into a medically induced coma, although the chances were high that I would never emerge from it. Imagine someone telling you that about your loved one as they lie there, unconscious and struggling to breathe. Cancer is an invader that affects more than just the patient. Everyone suffers - spouses, siblings, children, extended family, friends. Even, as I was to discover, strangers from all over the world. I was overwhelmed with the love and kindness of almost everyone who contacted me, but I also suffered terrible abuse at the hands of online trolls. I should warn you that parts of this book do not make for easy reading. I kept my promise to be honest, and wrote many of the blog entries when I was depressed and scared, certain I wouldn't live to see another dawn. I convinced myself that I would quickly perish, leaving my wife and two sons - then aged 9 and 17 - alone, and with no-one to protect them or provide for them. I wouldn't get to see them grow up, develop into young men, and eventually have children of their own. The prospect terrified me. For those of you who followed my blog and read the posts as I uploaded them, you haven't seen everything. This book c

Cover image of 'The breast reconstruction guidebook'

The breast reconstruction guidebook (2017)

Johns Hopkins University Press

For a decade The Breast Reconstruction Guidebook has been the best resource on this topic for women who have had a mastectomy. Equal parts science and support, it is filled with stories that illustrate the emotional and physical components of breast reconstruction. Readers will find advice about choosing a doctor and a procedure, insurance and payment issues, how to prepare for surgery, and what to expect during recovery. Expert commentary by physicians and insights from patients inform this book, as does the exhaustive research by the author, a two-time breast cancer survivor who has twice had reconstructive surgery. New in this edition are discussions of: the pros and cons of saline and silicone implants; solutions for post-lumpectomy cosmetic problems; new immediate-delayed reconstruction when post-mastectomy radiation may be required; the benefits and limitations of nipple-sparing mastectomy; considerations for direct-to-implant reconstruction; newly developed tissue flap procedures; who can best apply nipple and areola tattoos and why tattoos may not last; enriching fat with stem cells so it stays in the breast; patient-controlled tissue expansion; how insurance and health care reform affect reconstruction. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer whisperer. How to let cancer heal your life'

The cancer whisperer. How to let cancer heal your life (2016)

Coronet (Hodder & Stoughton)

This book does not offer a cure for cancer. It offers a cure for your fear of cancer. Both memoir and self-help book, this is the remarkable chronicle of a passage from 'terminal' diagnosis to exuberant wellness in just a few months. The Cancer Whisperer reverses our traditional adversarial relationship with cancer by teaching us how to listen to it; how to be healed by it as well as seek to cure it; and how to be emotionally free of illness even when physically curtailed. Living on the frontier between her fierce will to live and necessary willingness to die, Sophie - now thriving with cancer - shares her journey with searing honesty, unapologetic vulnerability and intelligent pragmatism. Alongside rare insights into a condition now affecting approximately one in three people, she challenges the mental conditioning we need to overcome to redefine our narratives about cancer. As 'the cancer whisperer', she offers a groundbreaking practical guide that will encourage cancer patients to: Direct their own treatment while preserving their personhood in a system that tends to see them as patients more than people. Engage with fear, anger and grief in healthy and healing ways instead of toughing it out, trying to be positive or collapsing into despair. Radically shift from being a cancer victim to a cancer listener-to seeing cancer less as a disease than as a symptom of other underlying causes, and engaging proactively with whatever changes it calls on them to make. Discover what the author calls 'the whispering, the reaching into a well of darkness and finding your hands painted with light'. Inspired, wise and moving, this book is as unflinching as Lisa Lynch's The C Word, as uplifting as Kris Carr's Crazy, Sexy Cancer, and carries us to a new threshold in our relationship with cancer, strengthening our ability to meet it with courage, creativity, gratitude and grace. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A whole new me. Getting to the bottom of bowel cancer'

A whole new me. Getting to the bottom of bowel cancer (2016)

Self-published using XLibris

Come with me on a journey to self-love, self-esteem, and self-healing. I share my experiences with you as a survivor of bowel cancer. I will lead you along my journey from crappy to happy, allow you to feel the multitude of emotions associated with recovery, and share insights into my holistic approach to the wonderful and fulfilling life I now live. Let me also share my successful approach to living life to the fullest, accepting myself and allowing only positive people and experiences to enter my universe. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'What doesn’t kill you, makes you stronger'

What doesn’t kill you, makes you stronger (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

“You’ve got cancer” – three little words that can change your life. “What Doesn’t Kill You, Makes You Stronger” is the honest, straight-from-the-heart account of one woman’s experience of hearing these three words. Right from the start, it follows every step of this journey – and it IS a journey – the tears and laughter, the ups and downs and everything in between. There is loads of information available that give you the facts about what it’s like to be diagnosed with cancer, what happens next, what the options are for treatment and a how to have a life alongside a cancer diagnosis. Most of these are written by those who have never had cancer. Not many of them share the emotional and psychological effects that being diagnosed have. This book does. It talks about the real side effects of chemo, the strange things you crave or can’t stand, the powerful friendships that develop and the fierce spirit within, which is determined to beat cancer. It’s not a “poor me” story……it’s a frank and honest account that has one purpose – to help other people who find themselves with a cancer diagnosis, to show them that what they are thinking and feeling is “OK”, that they aren’t alone and that it’s ok to have a laugh. “What Doesn’t Kill You, Makes You Stronger” – very frank, very honest and very true. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The shock factor. Sarah's story – beating breast cancer one day at a time'

The shock factor. Sarah's story – beating breast cancer one day at a time (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

The door handle started to turn and I knew this was the moment that could change my life forever. Mr Mahadev appeared with another staff member. He introduced himself and then introduced Sally, a breast care nurse, and sat down beside me. He started to go through my notes: family history, the results of the mammogram and the biopsy. Then he delivered the devastating news... I’m really sorry but the mammogram has shown two tumours in the left breast. Sarah Pickles was a normal 32-year-old married woman with a young daughter. On 22nd September 2014 her life changed as she was given the devastating news that she had a triple-negative breast cancer. Read about how Sarah dealt with her diagnosis and how she survived cancer as she shares all the high, lows, tears, and laughter of her journey. This honest and raw account of Sarah’s cancer journey also includes lots of information and top tips on diet, exercise, health, and beauty. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'How to help someone with cancer. 70 ways to help cancer patients and their families during cancer treatment'

How to help someone with cancer. 70 ways to help cancer patients and their families during cancer treatment (2016)

Rebel Redd Books

A loved one was recently diagnosed with cancer and you aren't sure the best way to help. Surely there’s something you can do besides bringing a frozen dinner? This book will be your guide to practical ways you can help a cancer patient as they are progressing through treatment. You may feel you don’t have the time, energy or resources to be of much help, but these 70 recommendations will provide affordable and manageable suggestions to help form your action plan. Topics include: -Advice on how to help patients traveling for treatment -Suggestions for both adult and pediatric patients -How to help families and caregivers -What you can do if you live in a different town or state You have the power to make a difference in a cancer patient’s life. These simple suggestions will allow you to help relieve the patient’s worry and frustration, freeing them to focus on rest, gaining strength, and healing during this difficult time. “Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.” Helen Keller (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The way we die now'

The way we die now (2016)

Head of Zeus

We have lost the ability to deal with death. Most of our friends and beloved relations will die in a busy hospital in the care of strangers, doctors and nurses they have known at best for a couple of weeks. They may not even know they are dying, victims of the kindly lie that there is still hope. They are unlikely to see even their family doctor in their final hours, robbed of their dignity and fed through a tube after a long series of excessive and hopeless medical interventions. This is the starting point of Seamus O'Mahony's thoughtful, moving and unforgettable book on the western way of death. Dying has never been more public, with celebrities writing detailed memoirs of their illness, but in private we have done our best to banish all thought of dying and made a good death increasingly difficult to achieve. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Smiles from the clinic. A humorous look at cancer'

Smiles from the clinic. A humorous look at cancer (2016)

Motivational Press, Inc

You may be wondering why a doctor would attempt to write a (supposedly) humorous book about cancer. Well, I have found that too many people, even other physicians, think that working with cancer patients is very serious business and must be pretty depressing work. However, my experience has been quite the opposite. The cancer patients with whom I have had the privilege to work with demonstrate humour, smiles and positivity every day. It helps them face their disease, cope with treatment and get on with their lives in a positive and meaningful way. They are definitely among the most grateful people I have ever met, and working with them has made me a happier and better person. Much of the practice of medicine is about relationships and, as we all know, relationships, at least good relationships, are often filled with humour. Within oncology (the specialty of cancer treatment), just like any other field of medicine, special relationships develop between patients and their physicians, and humour is often involved. That is definitely what I have observed in my clinical practice. This book is dedicated to cancer patients, as well as their families and friends. All the stories are based on my personal experiences and observations over 25 years of medical practice. Believe me, I am not a comedian or humourist - just ask my kids. I would never be able to make up such funny stories myself. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'What is cancer? A book for kids'

What is cancer? A book for kids (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

It is very difficult for a family to explain to a child what cancer is when a loved one has been diagnosed. This book explains to children what cancer is. 

Cover image of 'Thinks itself a hawk. Poems from the University College Hospital Macmillan Cancer Centre, London'

Thinks itself a hawk. Poems from the University College Hospital Macmillan Cancer Centre, London (2016)

Hippocrates Press

Wendy French’s meticulously observed and profoundly moving new collection grew out of a residency with the University College Hospital MacMillan Cancer Centre in London. Working with patients, sharing in their hopes and fears, tracking the everyday endeavours of a vital medical hub, Wendy French found herself drawn into lives in which blood tests, diagnosis, chemotherapy and hope become as much part of the human experience as cappuccino and Vivaldi on the radio. One life, that of Zipora, a Jewish woman whose origins lay in the darkest days of the twentieth century, is chosen for particular attention for its power to place everyday experience in large frames, but also for the brightness with which it reminds us that everyday life is unique and important. Wendy French brings all her gifts of compassion, precision, and feeling yet understated language, to the high task of accompanying the journey we call cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cancer with a small 'c''

Cancer with a small 'c' (2016)

Self-published using WritersWorld

This book follows the journey of my life through approximately a ten-year period during which time I was diagnosed with breast cancer. It contains highs and lows and hopefully will shine a positive light on this disease that will encourage other women.v Although any cancer diagnosis is devastating not only to a patient but also to their family, a positive outlook, a grateful heart and a belief that life can only get better is vital to recovery. There will be readers who understand the attitude that overtook me at the time; my marriage breakdown will resonate with others - just as our reconciliation will also be close to the hearts of some people.I also draw on some hilarious moments, because it wasn't all bad, my cancer attacked me when I was most in need of a break from life. Disastrous, worrying, life threatening and emotionally draining, the story will touch on some very personal, sad moments but also the victorious end when I refuse to even acknowledge that I had cancer. Yes, it was real, but it deserves no place in my life any more and certainly no capital 'c'.A cathartic book for me and hopefully an encouragement to others who may be going through a similar situation to mine, this book is an honest account of how I drove myself to get well again. Ten years on, my life is so different that I hardly recognise the person in the story. But it was me and it is my story. (Author)

Cover image of 'The fabulous woman’s guide through cancer'

The fabulous woman’s guide through cancer (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

"The fabulous woman’s guide through cancer" is for every woman touched by cancer but still determined to feel in control of their life. Giving real advice from a number of fabulous women affected by cancer, it includes tips, examples, stories, memoirs, information and ideas covering everything from post-operation styling, ideas to stay social when you can't go out, dealing with doctors, ways to stay lifted and lots more, all with plenty of kind words and inspiration to keep women on-track during this time. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Living with Timmy'

Living with Timmy (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

The writer’s personal story, who on the threshold of retirement, is diagnosed with a rare brain tumour. How will he cope as he uncovers more and more detail about the tumour? Does he opt for risky brain surgery or for a “watch and wait” strategy? And will his life ever be the same again? Follow his personal journey from diagnosis to the present day in this story. (Publisher)

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