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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 342

Cover image of 'Donating your stem cells to your brother or sister. A guide to stem cell (bone marrow) donation for teenagers and young adults'

Donating your stem cells to your brother or sister. A guide to stem cell (bone marrow) donation for teenagers and young adults (May 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Illustrated, colour booklet for children who may be donating bone marrow or stem cells to a sibling. It describes stem cells and stem cell transplants, why a transplant is needed, the types of transplants, the selection process, tissue typing, harvesting the bone marrow (including the risks and side-effects), and what happens if the transplant is unsuccessful. It also covers issues such as consent, what to take into hospital, and changes to sibling relationships. Includes details of useful organisations and a glossary of terms.

Cover image of 'A story about cancer (with a happy ending)'

A story about cancer (with a happy ending) (2019)

Frances Lincoln Children’s Books

A teenage girl heads towards the hospital waiting room where the doctors are going to tell her how much time she's got to live. As she walks, she thinks about her journey up to this point… the terrible decor in the hospital, wearing a headscarf, the horrible treatments, but also being with her friends, family, and her new boyfriend Victor. This is a story about cancer with a happy ending. It's about life, love, and especially, hope. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'The two faces of cancer'

The two faces of cancer (2019)

Troubador Publishing

Half of the UK population will receive a diagnosis of cancer at some point in their lives and most people will know someone who has been affected by this complex disease. Drawing from her three personal experiences with cancer alongside her professional experience as a counsellor and personal coach, Rebecca Brazier chronicles her journey through diagnosis, treatment and recovery. When talking about cancer we tend to think about the physical side effects of treatment. Although medical advances are saving and extending lives, less consideration is given to the emotional and psychological trauma which cancer creates. The Two Faces of Cancer describes and addresses this trauma and explores why cancer is difficult to recover from both personally and within society. It describes the devastation and powerful feelings cancer created for Rebecca and how she channelled these to create a meaningful life. It also draws from Rebecca's professional knowledge to analyse the emotional and psychological impact of cancer and to suggest routes to recovery. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Chemo companion. A friendly guide to chemotherapy and a collection of chemo stories'

Chemo companion. A friendly guide to chemotherapy and a collection of chemo stories (2019)

Rethink Street Publishing

This clear, concise book helps you to understand what chemotherapy may be doing to your body, your mind and your life. It gives you useful tips and information, practical advice and reassurance, and it reminds you that you are not alone. Part 1 is a brief GUIDE to the time before, during and after chemotherapy. It includes planning and preparation, common side effects, your thoughts and feelings, food and exercise, work and money issues, how you might feel after treatment, and where to find further help and support. Part 2 is a collection of STORIES based on true, real-life experiences of chemotherapy. Each one is candid and honest and shared in the spirit of kindness and friendship. Including an overly complicated salad, finding long lost relatives, flying paper aeroplanes, writing to new online pen-pals, and tips for friends who don't know what to say. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'For Freddie. A mother’s final gift for her son'

For Freddie. A mother’s final gift for her son (2019)

Michael O'Mara Books Ltd

The inspirational memoir from the founder of the You, Me and the Big C podcast, Rachael Bland. Courageous and life-affirming, this is a mother's final gift to her son. In 2016, beloved broadcaster and journalist Rachael Bland was diagnosed with cancer. Shortly afterwards she made the brave decision to share her story, and she spoke with beautiful poignancy through her blog and podcast, You, Me and the Big C. Having been told that she only had a matter of months left to live and writing this in what were sadly her final days, Rachael brings her warmth, courage and humour to the page in this heart-warming and heart-breaking story. Part memoir, part advice, For Freddie beautifully encapsulates the grace and fearlessness in which Rachael lived her life. This is her legacy and an incredible final gift to her son. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Beyond'

Beyond (2019)

Burning Chair

What happens when we die? Is this really all there is? What exists beyond this life? Alex Duncan is just an ordinary 14 year old boy. His main worries are homework, girls, the school bully......and his sister, Jenna who has ovarian cancer, stage B. As his parents retreat into themselves, Alex is desperate to find a way to help, a way to make things better for his sister. After all, it’s the not knowing that’s the worst thing. Whilst he tries to untangle the ultimate question, life still goes on: his best friend seems oblivious to his feelings about her, the school bully has taken a special interest in him, and everything he does just makes him feel more and more awkward and out of place. Georgia Springate’s debut novel, Beyond, is a funny and touchingly compelling coming-of-age story about love, loss and discovery. Read it and take an emotional journey through one boy’s quest to understand that most tricky of questions: what lies beyond? (Publishers)

Cover image of 'How long have I got? The story of a ‘terminal’ cancer patient'

How long have I got? The story of a ‘terminal’ cancer patient (2019)

Independently published

Suitcases filled with medication. Life and death situations. Multiple organ removal. Risking everything to stay alive just one more day. And people still moan to you when they have a cold. Welcome to the life of a ‘terminal’ cancer patient. In January 2016 thirty-year-old Fi Munro was diagnosed with stage four ovarian cancer. Told from day one that her cancer was incurable and ‘terminal’, Fi faced unimaginable pain, heartache and suffering as the life she’d dreamed of was suddenly pulled away from her. Yet in the wake of this news she did not wallow. Instead she discovered a remarkable inner strength, resilience and, above all, a very dark sense of humour. Years later and she is still here, having outlived, in her opinion, two ‘very unreasonable’ prognoses. How Long Have I Got? is her inspiring story. Honest, open and often tear-jerking this is everything you wanted to know - and some stuff you’ll want to forget - about living with cancer and an important reminder that we are all terminal. Reading this will change your life forever. Fi Munro is a multi-award-winning researcher, author, blogger, speaker and mentor recognised internationally for her presentations and articles on her journey and the importance of holistic health. She has been featured in two BBC documentaries, in TV and radio shows, and in newspaper and magazine articles across the globe. Today she is healthier and happier than ever before and believes cancer saved her life. She is currently training to be a shaman and is excited for what the future holds. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer roller coaster. How to manage the emotional and mental impact'

The cancer roller coaster. How to manage the emotional and mental impact (2019)

Librotas

Two days after celebrating her 50th birthday, Juliette Chan had an unexpected birthday present: bowel cancer. Luckily, they caught it early, but once the treatment was over, the psychological side-effects surfaced. For many months, Juliette was adrift and felt lost. It seemed that everything in her life was up for review and she struggled to gain clarity about what to do next. There were many questions, such as: When will I feel normal again; Why am I not as motivated as before; Will the cancer come back; Why am I mentally exhausted. It took her a while to realise that the cancer had caused a whole load of losses: loss of trust in her body, self-image as a fit and healthy person, energy, confidence, motivation, income and much more. And that’s when the penny dropped; she was grieving. Cancer not only involves coping with the physical disease and treatment – it also means experiencing and dealing with hidden losses that will affect how you view and live your life. Every time you experience a loss, there is an emotional response: grief. Most people only associate grief with bereavement but it is in fact a natural reaction to any and all losses, including the hidden and intangible losses you face with cancer. Anyone who has or has had cancer, as well as their family and friends, will experience grief – because life has changed. This can show up as anger, frustration, anxiety, ‘depression’, fear, sadness, for example. If left unchecked or suppressed, grief will affect your mental health and emotional wellbeing. It doesn’t have to be like this; it is possible to take care of the emotional and mental impact of cancer and to live well. In her easy, relaxed style of writing, Juliette explains the emotional and mental impact of cancer and highlights the limitations of Mindfulness and positive thinking. She has also included a workbook with simple practical exercises that help to release the psychological side-effects and provide clarity. You can also read the candid stories of eight others who faced cancer: Robert describes his initial feelings of shock on diagnosis and how others helped him to cope, whereas Meena recounts going it alone; Petra shares how she continued to run throughout her treatment, and Susan talks movingly about the seemingly endless decision-making from diagnosis onwards; Mary, Tony and June recount their unique experiences of the same cancer

Cover image of 'Tom has lymphoma'

Tom has lymphoma (November 2018)

CLIC Sargent|Lymphoma Action

Tom is ten years old when he is diagnosed with lymphoma. This illustrated, colour storybook for parents to read with their children describes what happens when he has to go to the hospital for tests and treatment. The story follows Tom from when he first feels ill, through diagnosis and treatment, to recovery and return to normal life.

Cover image of 'Jess's bone marrow donation. A children's guide to bone marrow donation'

Jess's bone marrow donation. A children's guide to bone marrow donation (January 2018)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

A colourful booklet for young children who are preparing to donate bone marrow. It explains what bone marrow is and describes what happens to Jess in hospital before, during and after the operation and when she goes home.

Cover image of 'Tom has lymphoma [Welsh]'

Tom has lymphoma [Welsh] (November 2018)

CLIC Sargent|Lymphoma Action

Tom is ten years old when he is diagnosed with lymphoma. This illustrated, colour storybook for parents to read with their children describes what happens when he has to go to the hospital for tests and treatment. The story follows Tom from when he first feels ill, through diagnosis and treatment, to recovery and return to normal life.

Cover image of 'All the time we thought we had'

All the time we thought we had (2018)

Polygon (Birlinn Imprint)

How do you start a new life when the person you love is about to die? At the age of thirty-six, Gordon Darroch's wife was diagnosed with breast cancer. It was a devastating blow just as he, and their two children with autism, were preparing to move to her native Holland. Eighteen months later, as their plans seemed to be back on course, came the second blow: Magteld was terminally ill and possibly had only a few months to live. As her health rapidly deteriorated, they became caught up in a race against time to get a dying mother home and give their children a future in a country they hardly knew. How could they build a new life in the midst of grief and loss? How would their two sons adjust to such enormous changes? And what would remain of Magteld once she was gone? All the Time We Thought We Had is a story of love and loss and a meditation on grief and memory. It's about how events shape our lives and how we cope with them. And it raises important questions about what we value in life and the legacies we leave behind. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The essential guide to cervical cancer'

The essential guide to cervical cancer (2018)

Need2Know

Awareness of cervical cancer has grown in recent years and many women are looking to find out more. It is estimated that 3,000 women in the UK are diagnosed with the cancer each year. This book aims to help women of all ages find out more about testing for cervical cancer, understanding how important it is to go for regular check-ups and overcoming the physical and emotional challenges cervical cancer can bring. Written in a sensitive, straightforward manner, the book guides women through the entire process from check-ups to diagnosis, treatment and aftercare. There is also an extensive list of sources of help and support. If you’re supporting a partner, daughter or friend through cervical cancer, or just want to know more about gynaecological health and check-ups, this guide will provide you with the sound, sensitive advice you need. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The unremarkable man. My encounter with cancer'

The unremarkable man. My encounter with cancer (2018)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

In this, his first venture into the literary world, Terry Barry has succeeded in producing a distinctive, perceptive and truly heartwarming story about his battle with life-threatening illness and disease, drawing on medical records and diary entries and written in an engagingly immediate style, skilfully and sympathetically addressing the physical, psychological and emotional turmoil that affected him, his family and friends, prompting him to re-evaluate his recollection of past events and determining his aspirations and goals for the future (Publisher).

Cover image of 'A moment of grace. A story of love and loss'

A moment of grace. A story of love and loss (2018)

Ebury Press (Penguin Random House)

Patrick Dillon and Nicola Thorold were together for twenty-eight years. Patrick was an award-winning architect and writer and Nicola a leading figure in theatre, awarded an OBE for her contribution to the arts at London’s Roundhouse. Their two children were almost grown-up. Life was good. And then, in May 2015, Nicola was diagnosed with leukaemia. After several rounds of treatment, a bone marrow transplant and many waves of recovery and decline, she died thirteen months after her diagnosis. Six months later, at Christmas, Patrick started to write. A Moment of Grace is the searing, tender account of Patrick’s life with Nicola and her illness, and his life after her loss. But it is more than a story of illness and unbearable grief: it is a book of memory, of home, of family. It is a tale of the transfiguring power of love. Heartbreaking, life-affirming and truly unforgettable, A Moment of Grace is one man’s journey to find life after his wife’s death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Dear cancer. A diary of hope to help you through'

Dear cancer. A diary of hope to help you through (2018)

Trapeze (Orion)

Renowned as a much-loved and highly respected BBC journalist, Victoria Derbyshire has spent 20 years finding the human story behind the headlines. In 2015 she found herself at the heart of the news, with a devastating breast cancer diagnosis. With honesty and openness, she decided to live out her treatment and recovery in the spotlight in a series of video diaries that encouraged thousands to seek diagnosis and help. Victoria has kept a diary since she was nine years old and in this book she shares her day to day experiences of life following her diagnosis and coming to terms with a future that wasn't planned. From the moment she woke up to find her right breast had collapsed, to telling her partner and children, through to mastectomy and chemotherapy. From wearing a wig to work and hiding it from her colleagues, to the relief and joy of finishing treatment before immediately flying to Glasgow to present a debate on the European Referendum. y sharing her story, she became the person that mums, daughters, sisters, husbands, boyfriends and family members contacted to thank as they tried to find ways to cope with their own and their loved ones' prognosis, and needed to know that they were not alone. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Everything happens for a reason and other lies I've loved'

Everything happens for a reason and other lies I've loved (2018)

SPCK Publishing

London-born Kate Bowler, a thirty-five year-old professor at the school of divinity at Duke, had finally had a baby with her childhood sweetheart when she began to feel jabbing pains in her stomach. She lost thirty pounds, guzzled antacid, and visited doctors for three months before she was finally diagnosed with Stage IV colon cancer. As Kate navigates the aftermath of her diagnosis, she pulls the reader into her life and her history - affectionately filled with a colourful retinue of friends, mega-church preachers, parents, and doctors - and shares her irreverent, laser-sharp reflections on faith, friendship, love, and death. She wonders why suffering makes her feel like a loser and explores the burden of positivity. Trying to relish the time she still has with her son and husband, she realizes she must cure her habit of 'skipping to the end' and planning the next move. An historian of the American Prosperity Gospel (the creed of the megachurches that promises believers a cure for tragedy, if they just want it badly enough) Kate finds that she craves these same 'outrageous certainties'. Why is it so hard to surrender when she knows there are no spiritual guarantees? (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A new kind of normal'

A new kind of normal (2018)

Self-published

They say there’s a book in all of us, but I doubt I would ever have written one had it not have been for my diagnosis of breast cancer in 2011. ‘A New Kind of Normal' is the story of my life up to and moving on from that moment. Growing up in the 60's, working through the 70's and 80's, juggling a career in TV and radio while bringing up three children and surviving two divorces. From the moment I knew what a bra was, I’d wanted breasts: I even crafted a pair of blue plasticine boobs for myself, as nature made me wait until I was 15 for breasts of my own! Through cancer I lost them both, and with the chemotherapy; all my hair, my fingernails, and more worryingly, a sense of whom I was. My hair grew back, as did my fingernails, but I still struggled with my identity. What I’ve written isn't a diary, nor a self-help guide, and it's not just about cancer. I’ve taken a really good look at the little girl I was and the woman I grew into, and why I went to such lengths to try and claw back some of what cancer had taken from me - it's not everyone's way I appreciate, and it’s been an interesting exercise trying to ascertain why it was mine! I’ve been honest, open, and meticulous when it comes to detail, as I firmly believe that if you take away the mystery, you can take away some of the fear. But there’s a lot to laugh about here too, as luckily I’ve always been able to see the funny side of a situation, preferring that to the occasional overwhelming despair I felt. In this book I've tried to move the disease away from the medical professionals and the hospitals, and to bring it into the day to day, because that's where it sits. Over the last seven years I’ve come to realise that the ripple effect of cancer is far reaching, affecting not just those of us living with it but everyone around us. 'A New Kind of Normal' gives an insight into my relationship with my then partner, now husband; my children and their reaction to my illness, my family and friends, my work colleagues, people who wrote to me, and the professionals who cared for me; everybody reacts differently. Breast cancer assaults your femininity - the treatment is tough and the surgery brutal.  It isn't easy, but it is possible, and I'd like to feel this book may be a source of comfort to anyone who's life is touched by breast cancer; maybe even help them to find their 'New Kind of Normal'. There are many things in life we may have to give up on, but hope is not one of them. (P

Cover image of 'The pond'

The pond (2018)

Graffeg Limited

The Pond is a touching picture book about a young boy, and his family, overcoming the loss of his father. This colourful, emotional book is filled with natural imagery, and will teach children not only about death and loss, but the importance of the natural world. From Nicola Davies and Cathy Fisher, the duo behind the beautiful children’s book Perfect. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'P.S. I have cancer. Wrestling melanoma and falling in love'

P.S. I have cancer. Wrestling melanoma and falling in love (2018)

Poetry Space Ltd

Mark Sims, a young doctor was diagnosed with advanced skin cancer just before his 27th birthday. This is the story of his 23-month wrestle with the disease, his passion to raise awareness and funds for vital research and how he found love quite unexpectedly, while working through his bucket list. Sadly, Mark died on January 19th 2017. His book is being published posthumously. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Only one of me. A love letter from dad'

Only one of me. A love letter from dad (2018)

Graffeg Limited

There's only one dad quite like me. I wish that there were two. I'd have more time to spend And I would spend it all with you. Most of us can't imagine having the time we spend with our children or loved ones cut short, but this is the reality being faced by mother of two Lisa Wells, who was diagnosed with terminal bowel and liver cancer in December 2017, at the age of 31. The Only One of Me project grew from Lisa's determination to leave a lasting legacy for her daughters and her desire to help other families rally against the difficulties of loss. Only One of Me is the product of Lisa's lifelong love of writing and a newfound friendship with award-winning children's author Michelle Robinson. The two collaborated on this tender and moving rhyming poem, with charming illustrations by Tim Budgen, which is both a love letter to Lisa's own daughters and a testament to the unwavering strength of parental love, a timeless message for families facing the challenges of bereavement. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Only one of me. A love letter from mum'

Only one of me. A love letter from mum (2018)

Graffeg Limited

'There's only one mum quite like me. I wish that there were two. I'd have more time to spend And I would spend it all with you.' Most of us can't imagine having the time we spend with our children or loved ones cut short, but this is the reality being faced by mother of two Lisa Wells, who was diagnosed with terminal bowel and liver cancer in December 2017 at the age of 31. The Only One of Me project grew from Lisa's determination to leave a lasting legacy for her daughters and her desire to help other families rally against the difficulties of loss. Only One of Me is the product of Lisa's lifelong love of writing and a newfound friendship with award-winning children's author Michelle Robinson. The two collaborated on this tender and moving rhyming poem, with charming illustrations by Catalina Echeverri, which is both a love letter to Lisa's own daughters and a testament to the unwavering strength of parental love, a timeless message for families facing the challenges of bereavement. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Being Adam Golightly: one man's bumpy voyage to the other side of grief'

Being Adam Golightly: one man's bumpy voyage to the other side of grief (2018)

Short Books

The cruel early death of his wife Helen tears up the script of Adam Golightly's middle-class, middle-aged existence. Miserably single, outnumbered by his kids and haunted by life's screaming fragility, he recounts his fight back against the hand of fate. This irreverent and frank memoir follows Adam's snakes-and-ladders journey through his grief in the year following his wife's death, as he struggles with small town tongue wagging, the trauma of teenage bra shopping and online dating anarchy.Adam's is the biggest mid-life crisis anyone could face and as he starts to build a new, alternative life for himself and his children, he shows not just how to survive bereavement but how to be transformed by it. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'If all the world were…'

If all the world were… (2018)

Frances Lincoln Children’s Books

A moving, lyrical picture book about a young girl's love for her granddad and how she copes when he dies, written by poet and playwright Joseph Coelho. This beautifully illustrated, powerful and ultimately uplifting text is the ideal way to introduce children to the concept of death and dying, particularly children who have lost a grandparent. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'My daddy is my superhero'

My daddy is my superhero (2018)

North Staffordshire Press

My Daddy Is My Superhero was inspired by Michaelagh's own experience of explaining her husband's brain tumour illness to her eldest son, and is intended to help begin conversations surrounding serious illness and death with young children. At its core, My Daddy Is My Superhero is about the loving relationship between a little boy and his dad. It is a story about love, fun, beauty, loss, sadness, memories and celebration. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Understanding cancer'

Understanding cancer (2018)

Booklife Publishing

Cancer is a group of diseases in which abnormal cells divide and spread. There are many different kinds of cancer, and different forms of treatment. Cancer is very scary, and can be very difficult to handle physically, emotionally, and mentally. Learning about how cancer affects the body and how it can be treated can help readers who know someone with cancer, or who have cancer themselves. This book can help readers understand complex medical terms and processes through straightforward text. Full-color photographs and fact boxes highlight important information. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The Boobies (and that nasty thing called cancer)'

The Boobies (and that nasty thing called cancer) (2018)

A Spark In The Sand

Ceara Hayden's book The Boobies is a lighthearted and informative story about breast cancer. Her quirky and witty rhymes convey this serious disease in a way that is accessible to young adults and grown-ups alike. Based on her own experience of her mother's diagnosis, Ceara's story brings warmth, hope (and a little humour) for those suffering or watching a loved one suffer from this devastating illness. All profits from this book will be donated to the breast cancer awareness charity CoppaFeel. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Our family and IT'

Our family and IT (2018)

Olop and Flossie Publishing

What does the mother say to her six-year-old when she asks the question that no mother ever wants to be asked? How does the fourteen-year-old cope with the illness while struggling with the typical angst of a teenager? This book is about an ordinary family who is faced with extra-ordinary changes and challenges when the mother is diagnosed with a potentially life-limiting illness. IT (the illness) becomes the uninvited guest in the family and as the story develops the frustrations, anxieties and impact all become very real. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The magical wood'

The magical wood (2018)

Lemon Drop Books

This is a story about loss, friendship and hope. The Magical Wood is set in a beautiful wood with a river wandering through. One cold and stormy day, the wind blew a terrible gale. The next day the tree family woke to find that Strongest Tree had fallen to the woodland floor and had sadly died. How would the tree family survive the seasons without the strength of Strongest Tree? Throughout each season the tree family are visited by a new animal, offering advice and support to the trees. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Radiation diaries. Cancer, memory and fragments of a life in words'

Radiation diaries. Cancer, memory and fragments of a life in words (2018)

Fentum Press

After a life of reading and writing, what does it feel like to be deprived of both, to be thrown back only on what’s in your head? The literary snippets that emerge into Todd’s consciousness during a month of radiation are sometimes apt, often ludicrous. They draw her back into childhood in Wales, Bermuda, Ceylon when literature functioned as friend and escape, to her unquiet past in sixties Ghana, then America at the dawn of the rights movements. Her father, nearing 100, is caught in the same ‘hospital-land’: both learn the selfishness of sickness and both respond by telling stories. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Your guide for the cancer journey. Cancer and its treatment'

Your guide for the cancer journey. Cancer and its treatment (2018)

Sheldon Press

Advances in treatment mean that increasing numbers of people now survive cancer in the long term. This book examines the sophisticated medical choices available that help to boost life expectancy and how to maximize your chances of recovery. In this positive and comprehensive book, Mark Greener says, 'Your cancer journey is deeply personal, often difficult and at times frightening, but today's cutting-edge treatments can help you to live as full a life as possible, for as long as possible.' (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Love and remission: my life, my man, my cancer'

Love and remission: my life, my man, my cancer (2018)

Trigger

In her mid-twenties, balancing a stable job and a partying lifestyle, Annie was also on the hunt for a man. She wanted to find Mr Right, get married, buy a house, and live the life she'd always wanted. But then one day, she found a lump ... Breast cancer. The two words that would derail Annie's life. Suddenly she realised how short her life had been, and the very idea of finding love seemed impossible. As her hair fell out, and her social life crumbled, her mental health deteriorated. She began to question if she would actually survive. Struggling with an identity crisis and worryingly low moods, she wondered if she'd ever be able to live the normal life that had been within her reach only months earlier. Love and Remission tells the tale of a young woman in search of love and mental wellbeing. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Spike and the blue chair'

Spike and the blue chair (2018)

Austin Macauley

The writer tells the story of her family and their transition through grief and bereavement. However, the story is told through the eyes of Spike the Cat, who joins them at the start of their crisis and takes on the role of observer, protector and helper. Spike is curious about many things, but he is especially curious about the blue chair. One day, he discovers its magic and begins to see how he can help his family by gently leading them onto its seat. He is a cat with purpose, helping his family through the 'rubbish days' that slowly change into new hope and fresh beginnings. He watches as they become a new blended family and learns what it means to move on with courage and love. "For cats know what you're thinking, they know just how you feel; They soak up all your sadness and purr with steadfast zeal." 

Cover image of 'Milkshakes and morphine. A memoir of love and loss'

Milkshakes and morphine. A memoir of love and loss (2018)

Square Peg (Vintage)

This is a singular memoir: an excavation of mother love, a candid account of the agonies, and absurdities, of the cancer experience, and a doggedly optimistic paean to life. When Genevieve Fox finds a lump in her throat, she turns up for the hospital diagnosis in a party frock and fancy hair. I can’t have cancer, she thinks. I’ve done my hair. But there is another reason she can’t countenance cancer. Genevieve was orphaned to it at the age of nine. Genevieve’s story weaves together past and present as she recalls her rackety, unconventional childhood, while also facing the spectre of being lost to her young boys. Yet, she confronts her treatment with the same sassy survival instinct that characterised her childhood misadventures. Through an extraordinary alchemy, Genevieve takes life’s precariousness and turns it on its head. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Echo's sister'

Echo's sister (2018)

HarperCollins

Twelve-year-old El has planned on making her first week at a new school fantastic. She won’t go by her given name, Laughter. She’ll sit in the back of the classroom where she can make new friends. She won’t even have time to think about all the fun her old friends are having without her. Everything will be great. But when her dad picks her up after school and tells her that her younger sister, Echo, has a life-threatening illness, her world is suddenly turned upside down. And with her parents now pressed for time and money, El feels lost and powerless. Then she befriends Octavius, the only other kid in school who gets what she’s going through. As El begins to adjust to her new life, she soon finds that maybe a little hope and a lot of love can overcome any obstacle. (Publishers)

Cover image of '100 questions and answers about prostate cancer'

100 questions and answers about prostate cancer (2018)

Jones and Bartlett Publishers

Receiving a prostate cancer diagnosis is a difficult experience, and leaves patients and their caregivers feeling anxious and overwhelmed. What is prostate cancer? What are the treatment options? What are the sources of support? The only text to provide both the doctor's and patient's point of view, 100 Questions & Answers About Prostate Cancer, Fifth Edition provides authoritative, practical answers to these questions, and many more. This updated Fifth Edition provides a comprehensive discussion of what you can expect post-diagnosis along with patient commentary to give you a real-life understanding of what these steps might mean for your day-to-day life. This book is an invaluable resource for anyone coping with the uncertainty of a prostate cancer diagnosis. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The essential guide to prostate cancer'

The essential guide to prostate cancer (2018)

Need2Know

Generally affecting men over the age of 50, there are around 47,000 cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed each year in the UK. There is currently no screening programme for the disease and the symptoms could be quite easily ignored, as they don’t tend to cause too many problems in the early stages. Prostate cancer is the most common male cancer in the UK. This essential guide provides straightforward information on the disease: from what the prostate is and how to recognise the symptoms of the condition, to what happens during screening and diagnosis, and the treatments available. Presented in an informative but conversational way, the book is aimed primarily at men who have just been diagnosed with prostate cancer, but anyone wanting further information on the condition can use it. All the medical issues are covered in an easy-to-follow way, together with sections that deal specifically with the emotional effects of the disease and strategies you can use to help your body fight the cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Goodbye Daisy'

Goodbye Daisy (2018)

Hashtag Press

Elsie and Daisy are best friends. They go to a special school, a school where the children have helpers and some of the children use wheels to get around. Elsie waits at the classroom door for her best friend to arrive every day. One day Daisy doesn’t arrive in school. All the grown-ups are crying; they are sad because Daisy has died. Elsie will never see her friend again. Elsie isn’t sad though, she is cross with her friend for not saying goodbye. Goodbye Daisy is based on Stephanie Nimmo’s own experiences of explaining to her daughter Daisy’s friends that Daisy had died. Aimed mainly at children with profound learning disabilities it is also a heart-warming social story and support guide about the death of a school friend that will support help parents, carers and professionals support a child through their loss and grief. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The essential guide to testicular cancer'

The essential guide to testicular cancer (2018)

Need2Know

This book has been written with the average reader in mind; all the information compiled is easy to understand and directed to a public that may be diagnosed with or fear the diagnosis of testicular cancer. The volume walks the reader through each step, starting from the self-examination all the way through diagnosis, treatment, recovery and returning back to normal after the fight. By reading through this book, readers will gain a better understanding of the condition and will have all the information necessary to empower themselves to fight the cancer successfully and react appropriately to the changes that are about to come. Readers affected by testicular cancer, either directly or if you have a friend/family member who have been diagnosed; this book will be there to guide them every step of the way. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Gone in the morning. A writer’s journey of bereavement'

Gone in the morning. A writer’s journey of bereavement (2018)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

An exploration of death, bereavement and grief. This first hand account gives Geoff Mead's experience of responding to the loss of his wife from a brain tumour. Giving insight into the grieving process and how Geoff learned to manage his grief, this book will offer hope to anyone experiencing something similar. After coming to the realisation that mourning is a conscious process, to which we can apply creativity, passion and intelligence, Geoff explored the unknown territory of bereavement through his writing. The book shows how artful practice, such as writing, can help to make sense of our experience and navigate the wreckage of grief. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'All that followed. A story of cancer, kids and the fear of leaving too soon'

All that followed. A story of cancer, kids and the fear of leaving too soon (2018)

Mirror Books

With four children (three of them triplets!) and a relationship break-up to contend with, some things get a little lost in the mix. Like symptoms. Emma Campbell bravely and honestly offers heartfelt thoughts on what happens when cancer becomes an unwelcome guest at an already crowded party. She shares her own terror and pain, mixed with the heartwarming and unexpected. The extraordinary kindness of people and the gritty detail of battling a life-threatening illness, all while being a single mum to four children. She opens up about her angels and demons, losing and then finding love again, a constant fear of death mixed with the joy and relief of living, the anxiety of cancer returning - then facing it when it does. This book has grown from Emma's blog Me And My Four. Eager to share with her followers in more detail, the secrets, the fears, the triumphs and the terrors that she faces each day, in a life as unpredictable as your own... (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A funny thing happened on the way to chemo. A rather unusual memoir'

A funny thing happened on the way to chemo. A rather unusual memoir (2018)

Short Books

"Cancer is not a laughing matter, as I was told by a cross German lady from Dortmund when I showed her this journal. She had herself had breast cancer and is right of course; there are lots of things that are not fun about cancer, most of them unavoidable. I was therefore as surprised as the next person to realise that a huge amount of funny things happen on the way to chemo, or indeed on the way to most places, and that once you get your eye in, you completely forget to be scared..." This is not just an educational book about cancer, although it is certainly safe to give to cancer patients as a cheerful present. More importantly, it sheds new light on why Kim Kardashian is worth Keeping Up With, what playlists to make for MRI scans, the truth behind the legend of Medea, bikini etiquette on a deserted beach, what to do with a glut of rainbow chard, what an Oscar-winner should say in an acceptance speech, how to deal with cold-callers selling life insurance, and what to wear on a March Against Menopause (layers, obviously)... (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Death and the elephant. How cancer saved my life'

Death and the elephant. How cancer saved my life (2018)

Unbound

12 June 1995. On his twenty-eighth birthday, Raz Shaw was a directionless gambling addict doing a telesales job that was eating up every trace of what soul he had left. The next day he would be diagnosed with stage 4 sclerosing mediastinal non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the large cell type. As he tells it, cancer saved his life. He was given the all-clear in March 1996, and stopped gambling for good that April. After a year away recuperating, he turned his back on the highly paid job that had devoured him and re-assimilated himself into the world of theatre that had once made him feel so alive. It took him a long time to realise quite how much these recoveries were bound up with one another – now he is ready to tell his story. Death and the Elephant is a memoir of living through and beyond illness and addiction. Blessed with the ability to find humour even in life’s darkest moments, Raz charts his struggles with irreverence and unflinching perspective. This is his story, but it’s also a universal one – an honest, funny, sometimes raw, and often inappropriate glimpse into the mind of a young man dealing with a life-threatening illness in the only way he knows how: by laughing in its face. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'On smaller dogs and larger life questions'

On smaller dogs and larger life questions (2018)

Virago Press (Little, Brown Book Group)

Coming up to her sixtieth birthday, Kate Figes found herself turning to the larger questions of family, love and life's meaning. It is like this author to examine different stages in writing, and her books - from new motherhood and adolescence to coupledom and infidelity - testify to this way of understanding herself and others: so naturally she turned to writing to explore the challenges of becoming sixty. And then - a horrible, and sudden diagnosis of breast cancer which had metastasised. Instead of a gentle journey into middle age, Kate Figes began to write for her life. Now, clawing back confidence and control was not just the ordinary business of these years: it was the only way to try and survive great pain and emotional turmoil. As her writing became an honest reflection on ageing, failing, regrets and the importance of childhood memory, friends, family and love she found a new determination to live to the full and about finding ways to face up to a shortened life expectancy with dignity. Original, passionate, funny and moving, On Smaller Dogs and Larger Life Questions will resonate with anyone dealing with the many griefs and freedoms of midlife. It is about living with a life-threatening disease but it is even more: an intelligent and passionate look at the way we can approach disappointment and trouble, friendship and love - every day. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Not that kind of love. A sister, a brother, some tumours and a cat'

Not that kind of love. A sister, a brother, some tumours and a cat (2018)

Quercus

A moving, thought-provoking and surprisingly humorous book which is both a description of a journey to death and a celebration of the act of living. Based on Clare Wise's blog, which she started when she was first diagnosed with cancer in 2013, Not That Kind of Love charts the highs and lows of the last three years of Clare's life. The end result is not a book that fills you with despair and anguish. On the contrary, Not That Kind of Love should be read by everybody for its candour, and for its warmth and spirit. Clare is an astonishingly dynamic, witty and fun personality, and her positivity and energy exude from every page. As she becomes too weak to type, her brother - the actor Greg Wise - takes over, and the book morphs into a beautiful meditation on life, and the necessity of talking about death. With echoes of Atul Gawande's Being Mortal and Cathy Rentzenbrink's The Last Act of Love, it is a very special read that rejoices in the extraordinary and often underestimated sibling bond, and the importance of making the most of the ordinary pleasures life has to offer. As Greg Wise writes in the book: 'Celebrate the small things, the small moments. If you find yourself with matching socks as you leave the house in the morning, that is a cause for celebration. If the rest of the day is spent finding the cure for cancer, or brokering world peace, then that's a bonus.' (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'The neuroscientist who lost her mind. A memoir of madness and recovery'

The neuroscientist who lost her mind. A memoir of madness and recovery (2018)

Bantam Press (imprint of Transworld Publications)

All we think, feel and dream, how we move, if we move, everything that makes us who we are, comes from the brain. We are the brain. So what happens when the brain fails? What happens when we lose our mind? In January 2015, renowned neuroscientist Barbara Lipska's melanoma spread to her brain. It was, in effect, a death sentence. She had surgery, radiation treatments and entered an immunotherapy clinical trial. And then her brain started to play tricks on her. The expert on mental illness - who had spent a career trying to work out how the brain operates and what happens when it fails - experienced what it is like to go mad. She began to exhibit paranoia and schizophrenia-like symptoms. She became disinhibited, completely unaware of her inappropriate behaviour. She got lost driving home from work, a journey she did every day. She couldn't remember things that had just happened to her. Small details like what she was having for breakfast became an obsession, but she ignored the fact that she was about to die. And she remembers every moment with absolute clarity. Weaving the science of the mind and the biology of the brain into her deeply personal story, this is the dramatic account of Dr Lipska's own brilliant brain gone awry. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Spoiler alert: the hero dies. A memoir of love, loss and other four-letter words'

Spoiler alert: the hero dies. A memoir of love, loss and other four-letter words (2018)

Atria Books (Simon and Schuster)

In this evocative and gorgeously wrought memoir reminiscent of Rob Sheffield’s Love Is a Mixtape and George Hodgman’s Bettyville, Michael Ausiello—a respected TV columnist and founder and editor-in-chief of TVLine.com—remembers his late husband, and the lessons, love, and laughter that they shared throughout their fourteen years together. For the past decade, TV fans of all stripes have counted upon Michael Ausiello’s insider knowledge to get the scoop on their favorite shows and stars. From his time at Soaps in Depth to his influential stints at TV Guide and Entertainment Weekly to his current role as founder and editor-in-chief of the wildly popular website TVLine.com, Michael has established himself as the go-to expert when it comes to our most popular form of entertainment. What many of his fans don’t know, however, is that while his professional life was in full swing, Michael had to endure the greatest of personal tragedies: his husband, Kit Cowan, was diagnosed with a rare and very aggressive form of neuroendocrine cancer. Over the course of eleven months, Kit and Michael did their best to combat the deadly disease, but Kit succumbed to his illness in February 2015. In this heartbreaking and darkly hilarious memoir, Michael tells the story of his harrowing and challenging last year with Kit while revisiting the thirteen years that preceded it, and how the undeniably powerful bond between him and Kit carried them through all manner of difficulty—always with laughter front and center in their relationship. Instead of a tale of sadness and loss, Spoiler Alert: The Hero Dies is an unforgettable, inspiring, and beautiful testament to the resilience and strength of true love. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The complete guide to breast cancer: how to feel empowered and take control'

The complete guide to breast cancer: how to feel empowered and take control (2018)

Vermilion (Random House)

The book you can trust to support you at every stage of your treatment - and beyond. Professor Trisha Greenhalgh, an academic GP, and Dr Liz O’Riordan, a Consultant Breast Cancer Surgeon, are not only outstanding doctors, but they have also experienced breast cancer first-hand. The Complete Guide to Breast Cancer brings together all the knowledge they have gathered as patients and as doctors to give you and your family a trusted, thorough and up-to-date source of information. Designed to empower you during your breast cancer treatment, it covers: simple explanations of every breast cancer treatment; coping with the emotional burden of breast cancer; frank advice about sex and relationships; staying healthy during and after treatment; dealing with the fear of recurrence; living with secondary breast cancer. Packed full of all the things the authors wished they’d known when they were diagnosed, and tips on how to cope with surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and beyond, this is the only book you need to read to guide you through your breast cancer diagnosis. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Anti cancer living. The six-step solution to transform your health'

Anti cancer living. The six-step solution to transform your health (2018)

Vermilion (Random House)

“You have cancer.” These are perhaps the most feared three words that will ever come out of a doctor’s mouth, and more and more people are hearing them. Yet most patients (and some doctors) do not realize that lifestyle changes can dramatically reduce risk, assist treatment and improve chances of surviving and even thriving after a diagnosis. Over the course of a major study Servan-Schreiber designed with Dr Lorenzo Cohen at the MD Anderson Cancer Center, six key areas have emerged: love and social support, stress management, rest, movement, nutrition and avoiding environmental toxins. Each plays a role--but it's the synergies created by this potent "Mix of Six" that can bring about real shifts in health and well-being, significantly improving quality of life and positively supporting conventional cancer treatments. Dr. David Servan-Schreiber's Anticancer introduced a revolutionary way to understand and confront cancer, changing the lives of millions around the world. He laid out the principles of integrative care that had allowed him to live many years beyond expectations for his own cancer, but readers have long requested a specific plan to implement his approach. Anti cancer Living is that book. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Breast cancer'

Breast cancer (2018)

Oxford University Press

Breast Cancer: The Facts provides essential, easy to follow information on all aspects of the diagnosis and management of breast cancer. It provides essential background information on the disease, from the ways breast problems are investigated, through treatment options and new therapies, to follow-up processes after remission. Fully updated to cover new and emerging therapies in breast cancer, this second edition also features new chapters on treating special or unusual types of breast cancer; surviving and thriving post-treatment; and coping and support strategies for the partners, families, friends, and colleagues of the person diagnosed with breast cancer. Each chapter is enriched with resources such as websites, links to videos, and care plans so the reader can explore relevant topics in greater detail. Written by specialists in breast cancer, the focus is on the whole patient, their family, and social networks, to make this book a holistic guide to better health at and after diagnosis with the disease, equipping patients affected by breast cancer and their families to be able to ask their health care team the questions they need to have answered to make informed decisions about their treatment. (Publisher)

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