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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 342

Cover image of 'Pretty sick. The beauty guide for woman with cancer. How to look your best when you feel your worst'

Pretty sick. The beauty guide for woman with cancer. How to look your best when you feel your worst (2017)

Piatkus (Little, Brown Book Group)

The ultimate resource to looking your best during and after cancer treatment, from a veteran beauty industry insider. Like many women who receive the shattering diagnosis of cancer, Caitlin Kiernan was concerned about her health and her future, but also about how the treatment would affect how she felt and looked - would she lose her hair? Would she lose her nails? How would she look after a double mastectomy? But unlike other women who battle cancer, Kiernan has spent her entire career as a beauty editor, beauty director (most recently for Life & Style Weekly), and now beauty producer. As someone who works in the public eye and in the fashion industry, Kiernan had to quickly learn how to look her best even when she was feeling her worst. So she called on her list of extensive contacts and beauty insiders - from hair professionals to top medical doctors (at institutions like Memorial Sloan Kettering and Mt Sinai Hospital) to style mavens and even celebrities (including Wendy Williams and Hoda Kotb) - to gather the best and most useful beauty tips for cancer treatment. The result is Pretty Sick: the ultimate guide to beauty during (and after) cancer treatment, covering skin care, hair care (and wig shopping), nail care, makeup, an explanation of breast cancer surgical options, style advice for life post mastectomy, and much, much more. Illustrated with charming line drawings and peppered with advice from celebrities and cancer survivors, Pretty Sick will be a welcome and trusted resource during treatment, helping women to look their best even when they don't feel their best. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'You just hear that word cancer and you just can’t take it'

You just hear that word cancer and you just can’t take it (2017)

Austin Macauley

Written as a diary, Lisa Primrose goes through the lows and highs of her experiences after being diagnosed with cancer. She takes the reader on an emotional rollercoaster: always positive but not afraid to give the reader a ‘warts and all' description of events. Her interactions with the Health Service are invariably good but she only gets the best out of the system by having a positive attitude to her condition no matter how physically disabling the symptoms are. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'Having a bad hair day'

Having a bad hair day (2017)

Clare C Davison

“Tomorrow, you will feel a little bit better.” From a loving childhood, belonging to a large family with no history of breast cancer, Clare was alarmed at age 42 to accidentally discover she had the disease. As a self-employed single mum, Clare documents her memoirs of personal experience and knowledge of the cruel decisions made for the aggressive treatments and hair loss ahead. With an inner strength of humour, Clare’s first book includes her lunch arrangements with Peter Andre, a cake nationally released in her honour, an experience of public speaking, media attention and continued fundraising with a moving excerpt from her son. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A most clarifying battle: the spirit and cancer'

A most clarifying battle: the spirit and cancer (2017)

O-Books (John Hunt Publishing)

Part resource and part memoir, this is the work of an extraordinarily courageous and shining figure who finished her manuscript before her illness finally claimed her. A Most Clarifying Battle provides a foundation for the reader to understand the experiential issues involved in living and dying with a cancer diagnosis and suggests simple exercises that can be used to build spiritual muscle and enhance quality of life. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Living with cancer. A step-by-step guide for coping medically and emotionally with a serious diagnosis'

Living with cancer. A step-by-step guide for coping medically and emotionally with a serious diagnosis (2017)

Johns Hopkins University Press

The prospect of entering treatment is overwhelming for anyone facing a diagnosis of cancer. While patients have access to a vast amount of medical information online, this advice is often unreliable or confusing. In Living with Cancer, Drs. Vicki A. Jackson and David P. Ryan have crafted the first step-by-step guide aimed at helping people with this life-defining disease grasp what’s happening to them while coping physically and emotionally with cancer treatment. An empathetic resource full of relatable patient stories, this book teaches patients and caregivers how to ask the right questions to get the best possible care―beginning at the moment of diagnosis. Drs. Jackson and Ryan explain how to work with a team of doctors and nurse practitioners to minimize symptoms and side effects while living as fully as possible in the face of cancer. They relay important information about understanding prognosis, and they translate what doctors mean when they describe tests, treatments, and medical procedures. Finally, they discuss hospice care and answer questions about continuing treatment and managing the final phase of life. Based on new research and a groundbreaking program in which patients are treated with palliative care―along with the best cancer care―during the course of their illness, this honest and caring book provides the right advice to use at the right time throughout a journey with cancer. It allows a person with cancer to concentrate on living the best life possible, despite an uncertain future. Patients at every stage will find Living with Cancer a comprehensive, thoughtful, and accessible guide for navigating the illness and its treatment. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Run for your life. How one woman ran circles around breast cancer'

Run for your life. How one woman ran circles around breast cancer (2017)

Pitch Publishing Ltd

Running has been many things to Jenny Baker – a space to achieve new things, a way to keep fit and healthy, and a source of friendship and community. She had planned a year of running to celebrate her birthday; instead Jenny was hit with a bombshell which rocked her life when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. She had one question for her oncologist: can I keep running? It gave her a sense of identity through her chemotherapy, while her treatment was stripping away everything that was important to her. Run for Your Life is the story of how she kept running to help her beat cancer, and how it helped her get her life back on track after an intensive spell of treatment and a turbulent time in her life. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Dolly daydreamer'

Dolly daydreamer (2017)

Austin Macauley

Rachel and Simon have been married for a long time. They are both parents and grandparents. They love Portugal, but life isn’t as perfect as it appears on the surface. Rachel had breast cancer and as time goes on, family circumstances threaten the very fabric of the family. Is their family unit strong enough to survive what the future has in store for Rachel, Simon and the rest of their family? (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The finch in my brain'

The finch in my brain (2017)

Hodder & Stoughton

When film producer Martino Sclavi began experiencing intense headaches, he attributed them to his frenetic lifestyle. As it turned out, he had grade 4 brain cancer and was given 18 months to live. After undergoing brain surgery - while awake - Martino found he had lost the ability to recognise words. His response was to close his eyes and begin to move his fingers across the keyboard to write this, an account of life before diagnosis and since. Defying all predictions Martino is still very much alive, words read out to him by the monotone of a computerised voice he calls Alex. But he must now live in a new way. This book - that he has written but cannot read - charts the effects of his experience: on his relationship with his young son, his marriage, his work and with himself. In the wake of his illness, everything must be reconfigured and Martino is made to question the habits, dreams and beliefs of his old life and confront the present. What he finds is strange and beautiful. Searching for the words between life and death, Sclavi shows that with determination and a subtle, persistent sense of humour, it is possible to change the story of our lives. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Welcome to the Pink Ladies Club. Fighting breast cancer and finding friends'

Welcome to the Pink Ladies Club. Fighting breast cancer and finding friends (2017)

Independently published

Karen Bates was diagnosed with breast cancer after a routine screening. In this frank and heartfelt memoir, she shares her story and tips for surviving breast cancer, chemotherapy and reconstruction surgery. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Benny's hat'

Benny's hat (2017)

Pomelo Pip

Benny’s Hat follows Friz’s story from when she first learns of her brother’s illness, right through to his death and beyond. With its realistic but hopeful and gentle tone, readers will see that it is normal to feel a whole range of emotions –sad, worried, confused, angry and happy, even during the darkest of times. (Publisher) 

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