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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 342

Cover image of 'The copper tree'

The copper tree (2012)

Strauss House Productions

When Olivia's teacher, Miss Evans, dies, the children at her school are encouraged to think of everything that reminds them of her. Written with touching sensitivity and sprinkled with light-hearted moments, 'The Copper Tree' is about love and legacy and will help children understand that, while sadness is an inevitable part of grief, death is not the end... for what we leave behind can be everlasting. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A cancer patient's handbook'

A cancer patient's handbook (2012)

Jack of All Trades Publishing

A 126-page book written by a cancer patient and his wife/carer that is ideal to give to someone who has just been diagnosed with any type of cancer. This book is very readable and gives much practical information on treatment, side effects and also on ways to rebuild your life once treatment has finished. The book also reminds us that cancer patients do not lose their sense of humour and that this humour can carry one through the darker times. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Love, Lucie X'

Love, Lucie X (2012)

Simon & Schuster

Lucie is the middle child in a family that has been devastated by the death of her mother. Struggling to cope without Mum to guide them, Lucie, her brother Hugo, big sister Chloe and Dad are dealing with the emotional fallout of losing someone so close, as well as the practical realities of death. As she tries to cope with her grief, Lucie starts to write letters to her mum and as she writes begins to feel that maybe, just maybe, her mum is still around watching over all of them. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Saying goodbye to hare'

Saying goodbye to hare (2012)

Southgate Publishers

This is an uplifting story written for children aged 5-9 years about death and dying. Beautifully illustrated, Saying Goodbye to Hare is full of honesty and warmth. As young Rabbit witnesses the life, illness and death of his dear friend Hare, the story explores some of the feelings and questions children have at this time. Inspired by the author's own personal experience of supporting her young children through the illness and death of their father, the story is sensitively written to give a positive, thoughtful message about death and dying. The book includes guidance notes for the adult supporting the child. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Missing mummy'

Missing mummy (2012)

Macmillan Children's Books

Written and illustrated by the talented and award-winning author-illustrator Rebecca Cobb, this extraordinary book deals with the loss of a parent from a child's point of view. Perfectly pitched text and evocative artwork explore the many emotions a bereaved child may experience, from anger to guilt and from sadness to bewilderment. And importantly, the book also focuses on the positive - the recognition that the child is still part of a family, and that his memories of his mother are to be treasured. Beautifully illustrated with moments of wonderful warmth and the gentlest humour, Missing Mummy is a touching, honest and helpful book that approaches a difficult subject with great integrity. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'My father’s arms are a boat'

My father’s arms are a boat (2012)

Enchanted Lion Books

It's quieter than it's ever been. Unable to sleep, a young boy climbs into his father's arms. Feeling the warmth and closeness of his father, he begins to ask questions about the birds, the foxes, and whether his mom will ever wake up. They go outside under the starry sky. Loss and love are as present as the white spruces, while the father's clear answers and assurances calm his worried son. Here we feel the cycles of life and life's continuity, even in the face of absence and loss, so strongly and clearly that we know at the end that everything will, somehow, be all right. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'A monster calls'

A monster calls (2012)

Walker Books

The monster showed up after midnight. As they do. But it isn't the monster Conor's been expecting. He’s been expecting the one from his nightmare, the one he’s had nearly every night since his mother started her treatments, the one with the darkness and the wind and the screaming. This monster is something different. Something ancient, something wild. And it wants the most dangerous thing of all from Conor. It wants the truth. Patrick Ness spins a tale from the final idea of Siobhan Dowd, whose premature death from cancer prevented her from writing it herself. Darkly mischievous and painfully funny, 'A Monster Calls' is an extraordinarily moving novel of coming to terms with loss from two of our finest writers for young adults. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Table for one, Sir?'

Table for one, Sir? (2012)

Austin Macauley

In this deeply poignant and personal memoir, John Flint recounts the experience of his wife Patricia s diagnosis with cancer, her death, and his efforts to readjust to life afterwards. John uses his own experiences to explore some of the wider issues about how society responds to terminal illness, death, and widowhood. But, in a book that is touching, warm, and wise, John focuses on some of the realities of each stage from caring for a terminally ill loved one to learning to live as a widower. In doing so, John provides an insight into the real emotions and experiences of a carer and widower. He provides thoughts on the practicalities of what to expect from experiences such as the first Christmas as a widower, going on holiday alone, and the well-meant comments of others; and, in a life where the tears are only an eyelid away, he provides ideas on how to deal with them. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Mum's list. A mother's life lessons to the husband and sons she left behind'

Mum's list. A mother's life lessons to the husband and sons she left behind (2012)

Penguin

On her deathbed, Kate Greene's only concern was for her two little boys, Reef and Finn, and her loving husband, Singe. She knew she'd be leaving them behind very soon. Over her last few days, Kate created Mum's List. The couple talked and cried together as she wrote her thoughts and wishes down, trying to help the man she loved create the best life for their boys after she was gone. It wasn't the first time Singe and Kate had faced the spectre of death. Four years earlier, doctors discovered a large lump in baby Reef's abdomen. Kate, pregnant with Finn, was so distressed that she gave birth dangerously early. Both boys pulled through, but afterwards Kate received the diagnosis that every woman dreads (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Mortality'

Mortality (2012)

Atlantic Books

During the US book tour for his memoir, Hitch-22, Christopher Hitchens collapsed in his New York hotel room to excoriating pain in his chest and thorax. As he would later write in the first of a series of deeply moving Vanity Fair pieces, he was being deported 'from the country of the well across the stark frontier that marks off the land of malady.' Over the next year he underwent the brutal gamut of modern cancer treatment, enduring catastrophic levels of suffering and eventually losing his voice. Mortality is the most meditative piece of writing Hitchens has ever produced; at once an unsparingly honest account of the ravages of his disease, an examination of cancer etiquette, and the coda to a lifetime of fierce debate and peerless prose. In this eloquent confrontation with mortality, Hitchens returns a human face to a disease that has become a contemporary cipher of suffering. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Unexpected lessons in love'

Unexpected lessons in love (2012)

John Murray

Cecilia Banks has a great deal on her plate. But when her son Ian turns up on her doorstep with the unexpected consequence of a brief fling, she feels she has no choice but to take the baby into her life. Cephas's arrival is the latest of many challenges Cecilia has to face. There is the matter of her cancer, for a start, an illness shared with her novelist friend Helen. Then there is Helen herself, whose observations of Cecilia's family life reveal a somewhat ambivalent attitude to motherhood. Meanwhile Tim, Cecilia's husband, is taking self-effacement to extremes, and Ian, unless he gets on with it, will throw away his best chance at happiness. Cecilia, however, does not have to manage alone. In a convent in Hastings sits Sister Diana Clegg who holds the ties that bind everyone not only to each other, but to strangers as yet unmet. As events unfold and as the truth about Cephas is revealed, we are invited to look closely at madness, guilt, mortal dread and the gift of resilience. No one will remain unchanged. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The topic of cancer'

The topic of cancer (2012)

Jessica Richards

The Topic of Cancer takes a completely new look at the disease which currently affects around one in every 200 people at some point in their lives. It is first and foremost, a manual, designed for those diagnosed with cancer but also for their friends, family and support networks. It is packed with good ideas and advice, as to how different aspects of cancer and health can be addressed, and how we can help each other through difficult times. There are chapters on how to cope with diagnosis, what questions to ask, how to manage your time, and choose your support network. There is a powerful section on positive thinking, and how to boost your mental strength, and a hugely practical section on diet, complete with recipes and store-cupboard ideas. There are chapters on what to say to someone who has been diagnosed with cancer, (and what not to say) and how to be a valuable source of help. All these are backed up with anecdotes and real life experience from Jessica, and shot through with her irrepressible and life-enhancing humour. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Go with the flow'

Go with the flow (2012)

Quartet Books

Diagnosed with breast cancer, internationally renowned photographer Gemma Levine determined to use her skill and connections to write a book about her experience that would be a companion, a resource, an aide and, finally, a practical guide to the incredible journey all cancer patients must travel if they are to regain control of their life. Medical practitioners, researchers, support staff, therapists, even make-up experts and a cordon bleu cook have gladly contributed accounts that, added together, provide a book of bountiful insights and comfort. A unique series of pool exercises which Gemma created for herself are included as an appendix. It is, in the end, overcoming the fear of and guilt about the suddenness of the diagnosis and the myriad unknown factors in coping with the treatment of cancer where this remarkable book will prove its worth. The skill and artistry of Gemma's black and white photographs contribute an additional, dynamic quality that captures the humanity and, ultimately, the love so many people involved in the treatment and help of cancer patients bring to bear. This book is, above all, a message of practical hope. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Thrive. The Bah! guide to wellness after cancer'

Thrive. The Bah! guide to wellness after cancer (2012)

Hay House

There's still a part of us that thinks surviving cancer is a bit of freakish good fortune - the medical equivalent of having a cannonball go right through your middle and living to tell the tale - and so often it's hard to know how to 'do' life after cancer. Thrive: The Bah! Guide to Wellness after cancer focuses on moving on from a major physical, social and psychological trauma. Like Stephanie's first book, How I Said Bah! to cancer: A Guide to Thinking, Laughing, Living, and Dancing Your Way Through, Thrive uses a blend of storytelling, practical advice, humour, thinking techniques and strategies, visualisations, meditations, questions, candour and common sense designed to help those who have had a cancer to get from survival to a place where they are truly thriving. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The life and death of an unknown celebrity'

The life and death of an unknown celebrity (2012)

Janus Publishing Company Ltd

There was less of her now, but I loved her more. In this raw personal account of tragedy told from a male perspective, the author shares with us what must be one of the most devastating things in anyone’s life when he loses his wife and the mother of his two young children to breast cancer. Darren then has to face telling his children that their mother is never coming back as he learns to adjust to his new life and shake hands with his sorrow. To watch a loved one deteriorate so quickly is very disturbing. To stand by feeling helpless as the cancer spreads through the body, causing it to die, is heartbreaking. Shoe obsessions, screaming, sympathy sex and Starbucks were all part of his journey of self-pity as he loses himself in idle distractions. Through this honest account, Darren shows us that there is hope, once the searing pain of grief has subsided and memories of a past become subdued as he is set on the path to acceptance and happiness. A world without love is a lonely place, so it is comforting to know that love can blossom again - even after the worst and longest winter (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer survivors club'

The cancer survivors club (2012)

CKG Ventures

The Cancer Survivors Club is a collection of truly inspirational, uplifting and assuring survival stories. These poignant personal accounts from normal people, demonstrate an extraordinary determination to survive against the odds. It proves with survival rates doubling, anything is possible. Unfortunately cancer affects everyone; worldwide there are around 12.7 million new cases diagnosed each year. Every two minutes someone in the UK is diagnosed with cancer. The Cancer Survivors Club has an excellent mix of stories, from the most common cancer, to the rarest. Some of the cancer types mentioned are; brain, bowel, breast, pancreatic, spinal, testicular, leukaemia, nasal and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Included in the book are a number of Chris Geiger's cheerful newspaper columns, including his humorous account of a prostate examination, getting sunburnt on a crowded beach and his Guinness World Record article. The Cancer Survivors Club will provide anyone touched by cancer with hope, strength and encouragement. Each story is written from the survivors or families own perspective, offering a very warm, friendly style of writing. This relaxed and sometimes humorous approach makes The Cancer Survivors Club an informative, positive and inspirational book that the reader will be able to relate to and gain strength from. Many cancer patients and those around them find the gruelling treatments very hard to cope with, they often feel very alone and isolated. This book allows anyone affected by the disease to focus their attention on surviving, ultimately making it their goal to share their story in future editions. Most patients have times when they feel they are the only person going through cancer treatment and have nobody to talk with. It is also a very difficult time for people close to the patient who have no previous experience in dealing with this disease. The Cancer Survivors Club is a must-read for the millions of cancer patients worldwide and a book of great support for their family and friends. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'When I die. Lessons from the death zone'

When I die. Lessons from the death zone (2012)

Little, Brown

On 29 January 2008 Philip Gould was told he had cancer. He was stoical, and set about his treatment, determined to fight his illness. In the face of difficult decisions he sought always to understand the disease and the various medical options open to him, supported by his wife Gail and their two daughters, Georgia and Grace. In 2010, after two hard years of chemotherapy and surgery, the tests came up clear - Philip appeared to have won the battle. But his work as a key strategist for the Labour party took its toll, and feeling ill six months later, he insisted on one extra, precautionary test, which told him that the cancer had returned. Thus began Philip's long, painful but ultimately optimistic journey towards death, during which time he began to appreciate and make sense of his life, his work and his relationships in a way he had never thought possible. He realized something that he had never heard articulated before: death need not be only negative or painful, it can be life-affirming and revelatory. Written during the last few months of his life, When I Die describes the journey Philip took with his illness, leaving to us what he called his lessons from the death zone. This courageous, profoundly moving and inspiring work is as valuable a legacy to the world as anyone could wish to bestow - hugely uplifting, beautifully written with extraordinary insight. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The yellow world. Trust your dreams and they'll come true'

The yellow world. Trust your dreams and they'll come true (2012)

Particular Books (Penguin Imprint)

Albert Espinosa never wanted to write a book about surviving cancer, so he didn't. He wrote a book instead about the Yellow World. What is the yellow world? The yellow world is a world that's within everyone's reach, a world the colour of the sun. It is the name of a way of living, of seeing life, of nourishing yourself with the lessons that you learn from good moments as well as bad ones. It is the world that makes you happy, the world you like living in. The yellow world has no rules; it is made of discoveries. In these 23 Discoveries Albert shows us how to connect daily reality with our most distant dreams. He tells us that 'losses are positive', 'the word 'pain' doesn't exist', and 'what you hide the most reveals the most about you'. Albert Espinosa has won several battles with death, which is why his stories are so full of life. He is powerful because he never gives up. And as a last resort he bargains: he swapped a leg and a lung for his life. He has learnt how to lose in order to win. He's hyperactive and prefers losing sleep to losing experiences. If you want to tell him something it has to be very good or told very fast. He loves to provoke people but he does it to make provocations seem normal. His greatest hope is that after you have read this book you will go off in search of your yellow world. Albert Espinosa is a bestselling author. At the age of thirteen, Albert was diagnosed with cancer, an event that changed his life forever. When he was fourteen, his left leg had to be amputated. At sixteen his left lung was removed, and when he was eighteen part of his liver was taken out. After ten years in and out of hospitals, when he was finally told that he had been cured of the disease, he realised that his illness had taught him that what is sad is not dying, but rather not knowing how to live. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Words for wellbeing: using creative writing to benefit health and wellbeing'

Words for wellbeing: using creative writing to benefit health and wellbeing (2012)

Cumbria Partnership NHS Foundation Trust

Words for Wellbeing' is an edited collection of prose and poems from patients, health care staff, carers and the general public. The authors included in the book all have their own story to tell about how writing has helped improve their health and wellbeing. The contributors include people from across Cumbria and from ages 7 to 94 years old, and include emotional pieces about a variety of subjects, and includes a foreword is written by award-winning writer Jim Eldridge. There are 14 chapters, including one written by leading author Dr Gillie Bolton. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Please don't go. Big John's journey back to life'

Please don't go. Big John's journey back to life (2011)

Mainstream Publishing

In July 2009, former Arsenal, Celtic, West Ham and Wales soccer star John Hartson was diagnosed with testicular cancer, which had also spread to his lungs and brain. But before his treatment even began, John came to the brink of death after contracting pneumonia, ceasing to breathe and undergoing emergency brain surgery. Against all the odds, he pulled through, and in Please Don't Go he documents his incredible fight for life. John's truly inspirational account of how he has managed to overcome a very aggressive form of cancer will offer hope and courage to others affected by the disease. Including the poignant recollections of his wife Sarah and sister Victoria, it is a touching and ultimately uplifting insight into the bravery of the popular football hero, who has fought back to full health in the face of adversity. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The fault in our stars'

The fault in our stars (2011)

Penguin

Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel's story is about to be completely rewritten. Insightful, bold, irreverent, and raw, The Fault in Our Stars is award-winning author John Green's most ambitious and heartbreaking work yet, brilliantly exploring the funny, thrilling, and tragic business of being alive and in love. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Being Sarah'

Being Sarah (2011)

Wordscapes

Being Sarah is Sarah Horton's personal story about breast cancer. As the shock of diagnosis subsides, Sarah starts looking for a treatment plan that suits her, searching for choices, and asks questions about all the medical drugs and treatment offered to her, from chemotherapy to hormone treatment. There are so many questions: in a field where so little is certain, what's best for Sarah? Why do we concentrate on cure rather than prevention? Is our terror about breast cancer sanitised by the 'pink' movement? And will I die? And there aren’t always answers. From the minutiae of getting through each day to the wider feelings of rage, hope, sadness, fear, loss, joy and helplessness, Being Sarah is about life, death, questions, options and choices. Breast cancer statistics in the UK are alarming, and the politics surrounding the illness perplexing. Mortality rates are falling, but diagnoses are rising. One in every nine women can now expect to be diagnosed with breast cancer at some time in her life, and - while we’re getting better at surviving - it’s happening more and more frequently. Sarah Horton is one of the 46,000 women diagnosed with breast cancer in the UK every year. This is her story. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Jack's radio mission'

Jack's radio mission (2011)

Lulu.com

Jack is a little boy who is having radiotherapy. With the help of Lucy, the radiographer, Jack pretends his treatment is a space mission.

Cover image of 'The elephant in the room: stories about cancer patients and their doctors'

The elephant in the room: stories about cancer patients and their doctors (2011)

Springer

The Elephant in the Room is a collection of real-life short stories about cancer patients and their doctors. These stories comfort and entertain, inform and engage, and are a treat to read. With humour and empathy, Jonathan Waxman explores the human side of cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Milo and the restart button'

Milo and the restart button (2011)

Simon and Schuster

Starting over is like pressing the reset button on a game that makes you lose all your points and wipes out any of the good stuff you've spent hundreds of hours learning...Surviving the year is all Milo has to do. Start to finish in one whole piece...But it's not just a new school he's dealing with; it's a new house, a new neighbourhood - a whole new life. And it's one without his mum in it. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Kiss from a rose'

Kiss from a rose (2011)

Self-published using AuthorHouse

Kiss From A Rose is a novel about my battle with cancer. It depicts my journey from being diagnosed at 16, and reflects on four subsequent relapses. Using the stunning rose as a metaphor for life, it is aimed at teenagers who have just been diagnosed with Cancer, and are about to begin their battle. I hope it is both comforting and informative, but also very honest as it describes my darkest moments, and deepest fears. It illustrates that although the Thorns on my Rose prick and sting with each hurdle I approach in my battle to fight this disease, they don't make the flower any less exquisite. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Artichoke hearts'

Artichoke hearts (2011)

Macmillan Children's Books

Twelve-year-old Mira comes from a chaotic, artistic and outspoken family where it’s not always easy to be heard. As her beloved Nana Josie's health declines, Mira begins to discover the secrets of those around her, and also starts to keep some of her own. She is drawn to mysterious Jide, a boy who is clearly hiding a troubled past and has grown hardened layers - like those of an artichoke - around his heart. As Mira is experiencing grief for the first time, she is also discovering the wondrous and often mystical world around her. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Chocolate chipped. A smelly book about grief'

Chocolate chipped. A smelly book about grief (2011)

Grief Encounter Project

Chocolate Chipped tells the unique story of a young boy named Charlie and his grieving over his Dad’s death. Using real smells and Scratch & Sniff in the pages to help evoke memories, this book explores the sensitive subject of grief in an honest, engaging – and sometimes even humorous – way. Chocolate Chipped can help adults to talk openly to children about the loss of a loved one. It can be read by bereaved children to help them understand their own feelings and by other children to help them appreciate what a friend might be going through. Teachers, educational specialists as well as Bereavement Counsellors would also gain from using this book. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Not the last goodbye. Reflections on life, death, healing and cancer'

Not the last goodbye. Reflections on life, death, healing and cancer (2011)

Pan Macmillan

This is the story of an award-winning psychiatrist and neuroscientist who was diagnosed with a brain tumour by his own MRI machine at the age of thirty. It is the story of a doctor turned patient who, after overcoming cancer against the odds, started a twenty-year crusade to inform people about the disease and inspire them to take responsibility for their health. It is the story of a husband and father who is told that the cancer has returned, and that he only has a short time left. This is a story about dying. But most of all, it is a story about living. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'How I said Bah! to cancer. A guide to thinking, laughing, living and dancing your way through cancer'

How I said Bah! to cancer. A guide to thinking, laughing, living and dancing your way through cancer (2011)

Hay House

This book tells how one woman said 'Bah!' to cancer through thinking strategies, a proactive approach to treatment, and a determination to keep the rest of her life going and retain a sense of humour (most of the time!). It shares everything she learnt along the way, from the nature of cancer cells and chemotherapy drugs, to how she was able to help her friends and family to help her. (Publisher)

Cover image of '[sic]. A memoir'

[sic]. A memoir (2011)

Bloomsbury Publishing

Joshua Cody, a young composer, was about to receive his PhD from Columbia University when he was diagnosed with an aggressive cancer. He underwent six months of chemotherapy. The treatment failed. Expectations for survival plummeted. After consulting with several oncologists, he embarked on a risky course of high-dose chemotherapy, full body radiation, and an autologous bone marrow transplant. In a fevered, mesmerising voice, slaloming effortlessly between references to Ezra Pound, The Rolling Stones and Beethoven, he charts the struggle: the fury, the tendency to self-destruction, the ruthless grasping for life, for sensation - the encounter with a strange woman on Canal Street that leads to sex at his apartment; the detailed Hungarian morphine fantasy complete with bride called Valentina while, in reality, hospital staff are pinning him to his bed. As fresh and beguiling as it is brave and revealing, Joshua Cody has created a book that gives readers a long glimpse into a gorgeous, dark thrashing in the forecourt of death. Literary, hallucinatory and at times uncomfortable reading, [sic] is ultimately a celebration of art, language music and life. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Enjoy every sandwich. Living each day as if it were your last'

Enjoy every sandwich. Living each day as if it were your last (2011)

Bantam Press (imprint of Transworld Publications)

As medical director of the famed Preventive Medicine Research Institute, Lee Lipsenthal helped thousands of patients struggling with disease to overcome their fears of pain and death and to embrace a more joyful way of living. In his own life, happily married and the proud father of two remarkable children, Lee was similarly committed to living his life fully and gratefully each day. The power of those beliefs were tested in July 2009, when he was diagnosed with esophageal cancer, leaving him with a 90 percent chance of dying within five years. As Lee and his wife, Kathy, navigated his diagnosis, illness, and treatment, he discovered that he did not fear death, and that even as he was facing his own mortality, he felt more fully alive than ever before. In the tradition of Don't Sweat the Small Stuff, Tuesdays with Morrie and The Last Lecture, Enjoy Every Sandwich distils everything Lee learned about how we find meaning, purpose, and peace in our lives. Told with humour and heart, this deeply inspiring book will help readers embrace their humanity, accept uncertainty, and live a life of gratitude - whether they are facing the end now or not. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer journey. Positive steps to help yourself heal'

The cancer journey. Positive steps to help yourself heal (2011)

Noble House

'The Cancer Journey. Positive steps to help yourself heal' is an inspirational and compelling book which provides the blueprint for dealing with cancer and is the book of choice for anyone affected by this disease. The authors, Polly, Pam and Nick have all had their own different cancer diagnoses, and feel passionate about sharing the information they have gathered which has helped them understand and cope throughout their journeys. The book is written in a warm, compassionate style with gentle humour, offering comfort and practical advice for anyone affected by cancer including family and friends. What should you eat, what shouldn't you eat? How do you deal with the side-effects? How do you politely tell others 'I have cancer' without triggering an uncomfortable silence! How to prepare for medical appointments and get the best out of your doctors. What can family and friends do to help? This book tells you things you need to know that your health care professionals may not tell you. Whether you have a diagnosis yourself, or you know someone with cancer, this book gives you the tools to empower yourself to take control and it offers advice and guidance to support you throughout your journey. When you arm yourself with knowledge of how to help yourself, you become an empowered participant in your own health. We will walk you through your diagnosis and give you permission and the tools to take control of your situation no matter where you are on the journey. This book gives you all of the information you need to make a difference in your health. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A woman's disease. The history of cervical cancer'

A woman's disease. The history of cervical cancer (2011)

Oxford University Press

Cervical cancer is an emotive disease with multiple connotations. It has stood for the horror of cancer, the curse of femininity, the hope of cutting-edge medical technologies and the promise of screening for malignant tumours. For a long time, this disease was identified with the most dreaded aspects of malignancies: prolonged invalidity and chronic pain, but also physical degradation, shame and social isolation. Cervical cancer displayed in parallel the dangers of being a woman. In the 20th century, innovations initially developed to control cervical cancer - radiotherapy and radium therapy, exfoliate cytology (Pap smear), homogenisation of the 'staging' of tumours, mass campaigns for an early detection of precancerous lesions of the cervix - set standards for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of other malignancies. In the late 20th century, cervical cancer underwent another important change. With the display of the role of selected strands of HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) in the genesis of this malignancy, it was transformed into a sexually transmitted disease. This new understanding of cervical cancer linked it more firmly with lifestyle choices, and thus increased the danger of stigmatisation of patients; on the other hand it opened the possibility for efficient prevention of this malignancy through vaccination. Ilana Lowy follows the disease from antiquity to the 21st century, focussing on the period since the mid-19th century, during which cervical cancer was dissociated from other gynaecological disorders and became a distinct entity. Following the ways in which new developments in science, medicine, and society have affected beliefs about medical progress and an individual's responsibility, gender roles, reproduction, and sex, Lowy demonstrates our understanding of what cervical cancer is, and how it can be prevented and cured. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Pink ribbon blues. How breast cancer culture undermines women's health'

Pink ribbon blues. How breast cancer culture undermines women's health (2011)

Oxford University Press

Pink ribbon paraphernalia saturate shopping malls, billboards, magazines, television, and other venues, all in the name of breast cancer awareness. In this compelling and provocative work, Gayle Sulik shows that though this 'pink ribbon culture' has brought breast cancer advocacy much attention, it has not had the desired effect of improving women's health. It may, in fact, have done the opposite. Based on eight years of research, analysis of advertisements and breast cancer awareness campaigns, and hundreds of interviews with those affected by the disease, Pink Ribbon Blues highlights the hidden costs of the pink ribbon as an industry, one in which breast cancer has become merely a brand name with a pink logo. Indeed, while survivors and supporters walk, run, and purchase ribbons for a cure, cancer rates rise, the cancer industry thrives, corporations claim responsible citizenship while profiting from the disease, and breast cancer is stigmatized anew for those who reject the pink ribbon model. But Sulik also outlines alternative organizations that make a real difference, highlights what they do differently, and presents a new agenda for the future. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'How to be sick. A Buddhist-inspired guide for the chronically ill and their caregivers'

How to be sick. A Buddhist-inspired guide for the chronically ill and their caregivers (2010)

Wisdom Publications

'How to be sick: A Buddhist-inspired guide for the chronically ill' and their caregiver is about living skilfully with the challenges of any chronic illness or condition. I wrote it for sufferers and for their caregivers (the latter includes people involved in hospice, chaplaincy, and elder care; for those interested in chronic illnesses and conditions (health professionals, family and friends); and for people interested in Buddhism (illness can function as a metaphor for suffering which, along with the cessation of suffering, is at the heart of the Buddha’s teaching). Chronic illnesses or conditions - such as arthritis, heart disease, and diabetes (three among dozens) - while not immediately life-threatening, are life-disrupting and stressful. The book is unique in that each chapter contains easy-to-learn tools and practices to help the chronically ill and their caregivers live skilfully, maintain equanimity, and even find joy despite the profound changes in their lives. A recurring theme in the book is that, although one’s body may be sick, one’s mind can be at peace. Some of the practices presented are traditionally Buddhist. Others I devised after becoming ill. Two are from the work of Byron Katie. Each practice is illustrated with examples from my own experience, so the book is also highly personal. The practices are intended to help with the following types of challenges: Suffering due to the relentlessness of physical symptoms; Blaming oneself for being sick; Cursory or dismissive treatment by doctors and medical professionals; The inability to visit with friends, participate in family gatherings, and take part in other social events; Feeling ignored by family or friends; Suffering due to uncertainty about the future; Coping with the disappointment of failed treatments; Caretaker burnout. At the end of the book is a handy reference guide, summarizing the specific tools and practices that can help with each of the above challenges. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A child's grief. Supporting a child when someone in the family has died'

A child's grief. Supporting a child when someone in the family has died (November 2010)

Winston's Wish

This booklet covers a variety of issues that may affect a child when a person close to them dies, both immediately and in the longer term. It has practical suggestions and ideas for activities to do together with a child and includes a section on suggested further reading and where to find additional support.

Cover image of 'The heart and the bottle'

The heart and the bottle (2010)

HarperCollins Children's Books

Award-winning picture book star Oliver Jeffers explores themes of love and loss in this life-affirming and uplifting tale. Once there was a girl whose life was filled with wonder at the world around her…Then one day something happened that made the girl take her heart and put it in a safe place. However, after that it seemed that the world was emptier than before. But would she know how to get her heart back? In this deeply moving story, Oliver Jeffers deals with the weighty themes of love and loss with an extraordinary lightness of touch and shows us, ultimately, that there is always hope. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Coping with the psychological effects of cancer'

Coping with the psychological effects of cancer (2010)

Sheldon Press

Cancer affects more than one in three of us. Until recently, the emphasis has been on battling cancer physically. Today, there is increasing recognition of the emotional aspect of having cancer, and survivorship and its issues are hot topics. This book tackles a sensitive subject in an upfront and practical way that acknowledges the uncomfortable and painful emotions associated with cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The healing journey. Overcoming the crisis of cancer'

The healing journey. Overcoming the crisis of cancer (2010)

Healing Journey Books

The Healing Journey is a comprehensive discussion of what people with cancer can do to respond to the illness, explaining the potential of different avenues from conventional medicine and the role of diet to psychological and spiritual approaches. Alastair Cunningham writes not just as a scientist but also as someone who has had cancer himself. While cancer can of course be a very frightening experience, he suggests that it can also give people an impetus to develop a new worldview and a new experience of life that can be deeply satisfying. In the book, he provides a framework for understanding ourselves and for creating more meaningful lives. This revised edition also includes contributions from Dr Claire Edmonds and Petra Griffiths describing how the Healing Journey programme, a structured approach towards creating spiritual and psychological healing, has developed in Canada and the UK. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Wife, interrupted'

Wife, interrupted (2010)

Headline

My story begins where most women hope theirs will end - with a big, white wedding. After all, isn't that how every good fairy tale finishes? I thought so. And at 23, in love and engaged, it seemed my 'happy ever after' was secure... That is until the man of my dreams died three weeks into our marriage. Look at me now: a 23 year old widow. You'd never guess. I've learnt to hide it well. Because the way I saw it, there were only two options... A) Dress in black, become a recluse and watch my wedding video on a loop? OR B) Decide falling in love again is out of the question and choose an easy, uncomplicated alternative - sex... Funny, powerful, and painfully honest, WIFE, INTERRUPTED examines the complicated process of grieving - and proves that sometimes the most unthinkable things can be the most comforting. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Mindfulness-based cancer recovery. A step-by-step MBSR approach to help you cope with treatment and reclaim your life'

Mindfulness-based cancer recovery. A step-by-step MBSR approach to help you cope with treatment and reclaim your life (2010)

New Harbinger Publications

If you have received a cancer diagnosis, you know that the hundreds of questions and concerns you have about what's to come can be as stressful as the cancer treatment itself. But research shows that if you mentally prepare yourself to handle cancer treatment by getting stress and anxiety under control, you can improve your quality of life and become an active participant in your own recovery. Created by leading psychologists specializing in oncology, the Mindfulness-Based Cancer Recovery program is based on mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), a therapeutic combination of mindfulness meditation and gentle yoga now offered to cancer survivors and their loved ones in hundreds of medical centers, hospitals, and clinics worldwide. Let this book be your guide as you let go of fear and focus on getting well. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The psychological impact of breast cancer: a psychologist's insights as a patient'

The psychological impact of breast cancer: a psychologist's insights as a patient (2010)

Radcliffe Publishing

What is it like to experience breast cancer? This book presents rare and valuable insights into the impact of diagnosis, treatment and prognosis from a woman who has experienced breast cancer as both patient and as health professional. It informs and educates readers about the psychological realities of living with breast cancer, of treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy, and the impact of social and historical attitudes to the breast and breast cancer on a woman's experience of the disease. The conflicts Cordelia Galgut experienced between conventional wisdom and her own first-hand experience are explored vividly and reflectively. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The c-word'

The c-word (2010)

Arrow Books

Carrie Bradshaw fell in Dior, I fell in Debenhams. It was May 2008, and it was spectacular. Uncomfortable heels + slippy floor + head turned by a cocktail dress = thwack. Arms stretched overhead, teeth cracking on floor tiles, chest and knees breaking the fall. It was theatrical, exaggerated, a perfect 6.0. And it was Significant Moment #1 in discovering that I had grade-three breast cancer. The last thing Lisa Lynch had expected to put on her 'things to do before you're 30' list was beating breast cancer, but them's the breaks. So with her life on hold, and her mind close to capacity with unspoken fears, questions and emotions, she turned to her Mac and started blogging about the frustrating, life-altering, sheer pain-in-the-arse inconvenience of getting breast cancer at the age of 28. The C-Word is an unflinchingly honest and darkly humorous account of Lisa’s battle with The Bullshit, as she came to call it. From the good days when she could almost pretend it wasn't happening, to the bad days, when she couldn't bear to wake up, Lisa's story is emotional, heartbreaking and often hilarious. The C-Word will make you laugh and cry, and ultimately reaffirm your faith in life. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Intimacy after breast cancer. Dealing with your body, relationships and sex'

Intimacy after breast cancer. Dealing with your body, relationships and sex (2010)

Square One Press

Congratulations! You survived breast cancer. This should be a time to celebrate - so why do you feel so empty and alone? Medical professionals prepare you for surgery and other treatments, but do not always address your emotional and sexual health. In 'Intimacy After Breast Cancer', breast cancer survivor Gina Maisano honestly discusses the sensitive issues of self-esteem, body image, and sexuality to help you become the total woman you still are. Part One begins by examining the emotions experienced by breast cancer survivors, including anxiety and fear of recurrence. It then offers guidance on regaining the confidence to start living again. The mental and physical effects of post-surgical medications are discussed, along with solutions for maintaining optimum health. Part Two focuses on rediscovering your sexuality. In a compassionate manner, it addresses the issues that most often challenge both single and married women and presents suggestions for overcoming them. Love and intimacy do not have to end with a breast cancer diagnosis. In 'Intimacy After Breast Cancer', Gina Maisano will help you rediscover the joys of being a woman. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Connecting through compassion. Guidance for family and friends of a brain cancer patient'

Connecting through compassion. Guidance for family and friends of a brain cancer patient (2010)

Cancer Lifeline Publications

This book candidly discusses the challenges of living with the personality and behavior changes brain cancer brings, and offers practical tools to make the journey easier. Joni Aldrich and Neysa Peterson have each cared for a spouse with a brain illness. They have combined their insights in this practical, straight-talking guide. Readers will learn: symptoms a brain cancer patient may experience; how to create and maintain a warm, comfortable and safe environment; methods to use if communication becomes an issue; how to deal with changes in personality, behavior, and emotions, including loss of social inhibition skills; how to handle issues related to changes in memory and the resulting confusion; how to work through indifference, sadness, and depression towards some peace; how to cope with self-destructive behavior-safety is your number one concern; how to have end-of-life discussions and fulfil final wishes. When a family member or friend is diagnosed with cancer, life as you know it has ended. Not only must you face the chaos of doctors' visits, exhausting treatments, and sleepless nights, you must try to savor every precious moment with your loved one. When the diagnosis is brain cancer, you must endure all this plus one more challenge: the person you love may look the same, and sound the same-but he or she is not the same. His or her personality may change in extreme ways. A kind and loving person may become angry and say hurtful things. A warm, upbeat person may withdraw or behave in self-destructive ways. The essence of your loved one can disappear, even as he or she continues to live. With the tools in this book, you can continue to love and be loved during this difficult crisis. 'The last weeks of Gordon's life were spent with someone that I barely knew and didn't know how to approach. It took me two years of counseling to get through the scars. It didn't have to be that way for me. And it certainly doesn't have to be that way for you.' Joni Aldrich (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Beyond the pink moon. A memoir of legacy, loss and survival'

Beyond the pink moon. A memoir of legacy, loss and survival (2010)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

In this touching, frank and informative memoir, Nicki Boscia Durlester intimately chronicles her transformational journey after being diagnosed with breast cancer. Her story begins with her mother, who was diagnosed with the disease in 1962: a time when breast cancer was only discussed behind closed doors, and long before women took an active role in their diagnosis and treatment. Nicki provides unique insight into being part of a large Italian-American family afflicted with the BRCA2 gene, and shares poignant stories about her mother and aunts who faced breast and ovarian cancer with extraordinary grace and courage. Nicki writes candidly about her frustration in finding the right team of doctors as well as the highs and lows of her journey, sharing humor and heart along the way. She puts a human face on statistics ranking breast cancer as the second leading cause of cancer deaths in women in the United States. This deeply moving story of legacy, loss and ultimately survival is told through the eyes of a daughter who shared an unbreakable bond with her mother. As she travels the scary, unpredictable road through her own diagnosis, treatment and recovery, Nicki discovers the most difficult challenge she faces becomes the most spiritually transcendent experience of her life. This Special Edition of Beyond the Pink Moon includes an Afterword from the author. A portion of the proceeds from sales of this book will be donated to breast cancer research. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'I miss you. A first look at death'

I miss you. A first look at death (2009)

Wayland Books

This reassuring picture book explores the difficult issue of death for young children. Children's feelings and questions about this sensitive subject are looked at in a simple but realistic way. This book helps them to understand their loss and come to terms with it. Written by a trained psychotherapist, journalist and parent, and illustrated by an experienced children's book artist, this is part of an acclaimed and successful series of picture-book non-fiction for Early Years. Books in the series give advice and promote interaction between children, parents, and teachers on a wide variety of personal, social and emotional issues. They are excellent tools for teachers to use during classroom discussions. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Remembering...'

Remembering... (2009)

Child Bereavement Charity

A memory/keepsake book for bereaved children for when someone special in their life has died, illustrated with watercolours by Daniel Postgate and written by Dianne Leutner. "Remembering" is a beautiful memory/keepsake book for children when someone special in their life has died. The outstanding illustrations by award-winning Daniel Postgate are light-hearted yet thoughtful. It's part book, part scrapbook, and was created to hellp keep a child's memories alive after the loss of someone special and to give children a place to return to whenever they wish. For ages 10 and under. This book received a 'Highly Commended' BMA Patient Information award. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Her mother's face'

Her mother's face (2009)

Scholastic Children’s Books

Siobhan can remember the way her mother joked. And she can just about feel her mother's hands, lifting her up. But she can't remember her mother's face any more. Then one day, a mysterious woman appears and tells Siobhan a secret, something that will bring back all that's been forgotten... (Publisher)

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