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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 342

Cover image of 'POG. Weathering the storm'

POG. Weathering the storm (2014)

Mereo Books

When Samantha received the devastating news that she had a cancer that was difficult to treat - in fact, the treatment itself might be fatal - she had to make some difficult choices about how to try and survive. Her story is full of pain, laughter and hope. Surrounded by her young children and supported by her husband, stepson, close family and friends, Samantha was able to overcome her illness through a mixture of conventional and unconventional treatments, some large leaps of faith and some very fortunate timing. She believes that with a combination of meditation and Eastern medicines she was able to put off further chemotherapies until Western science procured an answer. POG is a big thank-you letter to those who helped her on her journey. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Never say goodbye'

Never say goodbye (2014)

Century (Random House)

How would you cope with the threat of losing someone you love? Josie Clark is a loving wife and mother. She and her husband Jeff don’t have much and it’s often difficult to make ends meet. But Josie will do anything to protect her family and keep them safe. Bel Monkton is a successful property developer, living in a beautiful house by the sea. She seems to have everything going for her, but she’s lonely. And she’s let the shadows from her past cloud her future. Josie’s life couldn’t be more different to Bel’s. But three years ago, tragedy tore Bel’s life in two. Now it’s happening to Josie. And faced with uncertainty and heartbreak, they come to treasure their growing friendship. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The diary of a mother, her son and his monster'

The diary of a mother, her son and his monster (2014)

Empire Publications

Caroline Burch experienced every parent's worst nightmare when her son Elliot was diagnosed with cancer when he was just six months old. To document her experiences she kept a diary detailing the ups and downs of her son's treatment and the emotional anguish of their situation from diagnosis to remission. Ten years later, and with Elliot happily recovered from the condition that threatened his life, Caroline looks back at the traumatic months when there appeared to be no end in sight to the misery. Caroline's story is proof that there is life after cancer and this book is a tribute to the tireless work of the individuals who help parents and their children emerge from their nightmare. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Colour me in'

Colour me in (2014)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Lori fills every piece of paper in the house with tropical scenes, covers her head and face with flowers and even paints a sea-scape on her mother-in-law's dining room walls. Life-affirming and uplifting, Colour Me In is a story of serious illness, the edges of sanity and the transforming power of art. It's about what can happen when crisis strikes and the life you have carefully stitched together comes apart at the seams. When all the relationships you treasure - with your partner, your children, your friends - are challenged. Lori finally connects with the one person who knows her most intimately, someone she has almost forgotten - herself. Through art, friends and a journey of discovery, Lori finds her way to healing a life which has been cruelly interrupted, to make something new, whole, better and as wonderful as her paintings. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer Olympics'

The cancer Olympics (2014)

Self-published using Friesen press

Diagnosed with a late-stage cancer, after years of bungled and inadequate medical attention...and then to discover that the best-practice chemotherapy is not available in your province. After her delayed diagnosis of colorectal cancer, Robin McGee reaches out to her community using a blog entitled "Robin's Cancer Olympics." Often uplifting and humourous, the blog posts and responses follow her into the harsh landscape of cancer treatment, medical regulation, and provincial politics. If she and her supporters are to be successful in lobbying the government for the chemotherapy, she must overcome many formidable and frightening hurdles. And time is running out. . . A true story, The Cancer Olympics is a suspenseful and poignant treatment of an unthinkable situation, an account of advocacy and survival that explores our deepest values regarding democracy, medicine, and friendship. www.thecancerolympics.com (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Remembering hare. The great race'

Remembering hare. The great race (2014)

Southgate Publishers

This beautifully illustrated story, written for children aged 5 - 9 years, is about coming to terms with the death of someone special. Featuring the same much-loved characters from "Saying goodbye to hare", Rabbit and Buzzard reflect together on the ups and downs, feelings and experiences of the first year following the death of their dear friend Hare, as they watch the "Great Race". This lovely book is about treasuring memories, creating a legacy and celebrating the life of the person who has died.  Inspired by the author's experience of supporting her young children following the death of their father, this book delivers a hopeful, supportive message for children and adults alike. There are guidance notes included for the adult who is supporting the child; these are aimed at helping further exploration of the questions and feelings children have at this difficult time. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Getting off the emotional roller coaster of cancer. A toolbox for patients, survivors, family members and caregivers'

Getting off the emotional roller coaster of cancer. A toolbox for patients, survivors, family members and caregivers (2014)

Anchor Rose Publishing

You sit across the desk from your doctor – and you learn you have cancer. As though you just got on a racing roller coaster, you’re suddenly overwhelmed with fear, anxiety, grief and depression. The journey with cancer begins. Are you prepared emotionally? Medical treatments for cancer continue to advance, yet tools to help cancer patients address their emotional wellbeing still lag behind. Physicians and psychologists now realize that healing is often greatly improved when both the physical and emotional needs of patients are met. In Getting Off the Emotional Roller Coaster of Cancer, cancer psychotherapist Niki Barr gently guides you through diagnosis, medical treatment and beyond. This groundbreaking book gives you effective, easy-to-use tools to manage your journey through cancer with confidence and calm. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'What a blip. A breast cancer journal of survival and finding the wisdom'

What a blip. A breast cancer journal of survival and finding the wisdom (2014)

Soul Rocks

It isn't what happens to you, it's what you do when it happens. Through the trauma of breast cancer Alicia Garey came out of the writing closet to share her experience and how she restored her balance. Facing the challenges of motherhood, running an interior design business while also being a wife, daughter, sister and friend, Alicia celebrates the gift of life through a new lens, and finds the joy by seeing the light in her darkest hours. Alicia dedicates her story to all of us who have or will face a terrifying life challenge. As far as she can tell, the challenges do indeed come our way, and we learn from them. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'What does super Jonny do when mum gets sick?'

What does super Jonny do when mum gets sick? (2014)

Books For Caring Kids

Jonny is a little superhero with a BIG problem. His Mum is sick. How can he help? Join Super Jonny and Bear, as they go to the hospital to investigate. LEARN who the staff working in the hospital are and what they do. DISCOVER Jonny's secret weapon. Super Jonny is recommended by teachers for teachers. The question page links to the English and New Zealand national curriculums. These questions teach the children how to help the sick. Some people need regular hospital care to manage their disease. These people have their own page entitled: Preparing for a hospital admission: 5 tips for chronically ill moms. This ensures that any mother who is going into hospital, has some supplies when her children visit. This list of simple suggestions could also be filled by any adult wanting to help a Mom who is suddenly sick. With its big bold professionally drawn illustrations, Super Jonny is a valuable resource for your family, school or medical centre. (Publisher).

Cover image of 'A brain tumour's travel tale'

A brain tumour's travel tale (2014)

Lulu.com

This is the diary of Claire Bullimore, who was diagnosed at the age of 25 with a life-threatening intraventricular meningioma, in other words a brain tumour the size of a grapefruit! It is not always easy for a person on the outside to see what is really happening to someone affected by a traumatic experience such as this. The book shows the true emotion of someone dealing with the hardships of a brain tumour, surgery, recovery and then the scars inside and out. Written as a series of diary entries you will feel like you are there on the journey. There is love, friendship and courage - you will cry, laugh, find things you didn't know before. This book can help families and friends or other outsiders to see what a brain tumour survivor really wants you to know. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The iceberg. A memoir'

The iceberg. A memoir (2014)

Atlantic Books

In 2008 the art critic Tom Lubbock was diagnosed with a brain tumour. The tumour was located in the area controlling speech and language, and would eventually rob him of the ability to speak. He died early in 2011. Marion Coutts was his wife. In short bursts of beautiful, textured prose, Coutts describes the eighteen months leading up to her partner's death. This book is an account of a family unit, man, woman, young child, under assault, and how the three of them fought to keep it intact. Written with extraordinary narrative force and power, The Iceberg is almost shocking in its rawness. It charts the deterioration of Tom's speech even as it records the developing language of his child. Fury, selfishness, grief, indignity and impotence are all examined and brought to light. Yet out of this comes a rare story about belonging, an 'adventure of being and dying'. This book is a celebration of each other, friends, family, art, work, love and language. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A room full of chocolate. A story of friendship, family and pot-bellied pigs'

A room full of chocolate. A story of friendship, family and pot-bellied pigs (2014)

Hodder Children's Books

Grace's fun-loving Mum has found a lump. Her north London world of sleepovers, tap dancing and playing the clarinet fall apart when she is sent to live with her grumpy old granddad on his farm in Yorkshire while her mother goes into hospital to get better. Grace misses her mother so much it hurts, and doesn't quite understand what is happening to her. And things go from bad to worse when she starts school and becomes the bullies' latest target. But Grace is no longer alone when she meets Rainbow Girl Megan and her pig, Claude - when she's with them she feels as if she can confront anything. At Easter time when Grace misses her mum the most, she knows she must find a way to get to London. With Megan's help, she hatches a plan to run away that involves Claude, chocolate Easter eggs and a risky ID swap. But it's all worth it if it means that she finally gets to see her mum ...(Publisher)

Cover image of 'Until further notice, I am alive'

Until further notice, I am alive (2014)

Granta Books

In 2008, Tom Lubbock was diagnosed with a brain tumour, and told he had only one or two years to live. In this remarkable record of those years, lived out in three-month intervals between scans, he examines the question of how to live with death in sight. As the tumour progressed, Tom engaged intensely and imaginatively with work, art, friends, and his wife and their young son, while trying to remain focused on the fact of his impending death. His tumour was located in the area of the brain associated with language, and he describes losing control over the spoken and written word and the resources he drew on to keep communicating; a struggle which brought him ever closer to the mysteries of the origin of speech. As the Independent's chief art critic, he was renowned for the clarity and unconventionality of his writing, and the same fierce intelligence permeates this extraordinary memoir. This is a book written by a man wholly engaged with life even as it ends. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Shrinking the smirch. A workbook to enable and inspire people with physical or mental health challenges'

Shrinking the smirch. A workbook to enable and inspire people with physical or mental health challenges (2014)

Speechmark Publishing Ltd

Shrinking the Smirch is a unique workbook for anybody who is living with a long term physical or psychological condition including MS, Parkinson's, brain injury, epilepsy, chronic fatigue, epilepsy, stroke, cancer, depression, eating disorders, trauma or anxiety. The workbook asks the reader to think about their symptoms as something external to them - a smirch. A smirch is an annoying little imaginary creature who seeks to make humans sad and unhealthy, helps you work out what your smirch makes you think, feel and do and create an image or description of your own smirch, includes twenty practical ways to shrink your smirch ideas, based on psychological approaches that have been proven to work including narrative therapy, CBT. ACT, systemic and solution focused models as well as mindfulness and positive psychological. This book offers a dynamic approach to managing mental and physical health challenges. Written in an accessible but unpatronising manner with marvellous pictures and some positive humour make it an easy read and will be a very useful resource for individuals with health conditions as well as therapists, teachers, life coaches and health professionals. (Publishing)

Cover image of 'Probably nothing. A diary of not-your-average nine months'

Probably nothing. A diary of not-your-average nine months (2014)

Viking

A moving, funny and inspiring graphic memoir by a woman who discovered she had cancer whilst she was pregnant: 'I am glad. And then sad. (But) Mum's bought me a furry snood. 'Ooh, lovely!'' At 31, Matilda Tristram was 17 weeks pregnant and looking forward to having her first baby. Then she discovered she had cancer. This touching and hilarious graphic memoir, which is never morose or self-pitying, starts at the moment Matilda was diagnosed and ends when her course of chemotherapy finishes in October 2013. Recording the awkward conversations, the highs and lows of treatment, the mixed blessings of receiving 'Get Well' cards, and the reality of still having to queue too long for croissants, Matilda captures her experiences with characteristic style and warmth. Along the way she cherishes the small details of life, and learns not to sweat the big things. Her beautiful and boisterous son was born without complications and is reliably keeping her up most nights. Charming, witty and uplifting - this unique and beautifully illustrated book will leave you cherishing the good things in life, and ready to face your own challenges. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer wellness cookbook'

The cancer wellness cookbook (2014)

Sasquatch Books

This book's mission is simple: optimise the quality of life for people living with cancer. Based on the latest scientific research, this nutritional plan focuses on the foods that have been shown to prevent and forestall the spread of cancer. Also, here are 100 recipes that are bountiful in the nutrients that aid a person undergoing chemotherapy. And these dishes taste great, even for someone with a diminished appetite. Super-healthy foods like berries, mushrooms, beans, tomatoes and fish, make for tasty meals that are so, so good for your health. Understand what foods are especially healthy and why, and then make any of the 100 recipes to aid a healthy lifestyle that is so important before, during and after treatment. This is the nutrition plan and cookbook from Seattle's Cancer Lifeline, a 40-year old organisation dedicated to optimising the lives of people living with cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Travels with Cookie. Narrowboat cruising with a cat'

Travels with Cookie. Narrowboat cruising with a cat (2014)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Between 2004 and 2006, David Thomas experienced a series of disasters in his life, culminating in being told that he only had a short time left to live. Rather than sinking into despair as many people would, he decided to fulfil his lifelong dream of living on a canal boat, while he still could. So he bought a narrowboat, LadyRiverMouse (an anagram of 'Live Your Dreams') with a view to spending the rest of his limited life cruising the canals and rivers of England. Naturally, he had to take the love of his life with him – a rather bad-tempered fluffy white prima donna of a cat called Cookie. Cookie was an indoor cat who had rarely been outside, never mind living on a boat, where according to David dogs are usually the pets of choice. Would it work out? David didn't know, but as he put it, “I wasn't going anywhere without my beloved Cookie”. The remainder of the book is an account of the few years David spent travelling through the waterways of his native land. Many people live on boats; few cruise as extensively as David did – to London, along the Thames, up to Wales, then tackling the wild and often desolate rivers of North West England. A beginner to boating when he started, David learned much as time went on, mainly by having numerous – and often hair-raising - adventures. So did Cookie, who contrived to get lost, fall in the water on a number of occasions, and generally use up most of her cat's nine lives. Finally David met Helen, a helicopter instructor, writer, and – most importantly – cat lover. They fell in love, and David's life began to change yet again, leading to the eventual sale of LadyRiverMouse and a new life in the Peak District for David and Cookie. David knows about boating, has an eye for detail, and is also an astute observer of his fellow men and women, both on and off the waterways. Therefore this book will clearly be of interest to those who have ever travelled on the canals or done any other boating, anyone who loves travel of any type, or simply the armchair traveller who enjoys reading about others' adventures. But “Travels With Cookie” is more than just another boating or travel book. It is a tale of bereavement and divorce, of terminal illness and despair, and finally of romance, a seemingly miraculous cure, and a new life. Hence it should appeal to anyone who likes human interest stories of any type. And of course – as Cookie herself would tell you if she could speak - it i

Cover image of 'Laryngectomy is not a tragedy. An introduction to pharyngeal speech'

Laryngectomy is not a tragedy. An introduction to pharyngeal speech (2013)

Cancer Laryngectomee Trust

This updated edition contains the original chapters written by Sydney Norgate in 1989 plus additional material by Dr Nicola Oswald on current speech methods and future developments. It will provide help and encouragement to all laryngectomy patients and their families. It is full of practical advice and information, as well as reassurance. The author, who had himself had his larynx removed, wrote from personal experience of the problems caused by the loss of normal speech, and describes the method of learning to use substitute pharyngeal speech. Written in a straightforward, humorous style and illustrated with cartoons 'Laryngectomy is not a Tragedy' has proved to be a valuable source of advice and inspiration to all those who face this operation. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer survivor's companion. Practical ways to cope with your feelings after cancer'

The cancer survivor's companion. Practical ways to cope with your feelings after cancer (2013)

Piatkus (Little, Brown Book Group)

Coping with life after cancer can be tough. The idea that the end of successful treatment brings relief and peace just isn't true for countless survivors. Many feel unexpectedly alone, worried and adrift. You're supposed to be getting your life 'back on track' but your life has changed. You have changed. With reassurance and understanding, Dr Frances Goodhart and Lucy Atkins help readers deal with the emotional fallout of cancer whether it's days, months or years since the treatment ended. Drawing on Dr Goodhart's extensive experience working in the NHS with cancer survivors, this guide is packed with practical and simple self-help tools to tackle issues such as worry and anxiety, depression and low mood, anger, low self-esteem and body image, relationships and sex, fatigue, sleep and relaxation. If you are a cancer survivor, this book will support you every step of the way. If you are supporting a loved one, friend, colleague or your patient, this is a vital read. Winner of the 2012 Best Health Book category in the Guild of Health Writers Awards and highly commended in the Popular Medicine category at the BMA Medical Book Awards 2012 this is the first UK book to look in depth at cancer survivorship and its emotional fallout. Government statistics indicate around 2 million people in the UK survive for at least 5 years post diagnosis and this figure is set to increase. This book will be an invaluable resource. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Surviving and thriving. My encounter with cancer'

Surviving and thriving. My encounter with cancer (2013)

David Grant

This is a story about fighting the "inevitable". Diagnosed with a Grade 4 Glioblastoma Multiforme in 2005 with medical expectations of 12/15 months, I am living life to the full. Don't accept average survival stats, ask instead, "just what is possible". Good luck. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The paper dolls'

The paper dolls (2013)

Macmillan Children’s Books

A string of paper dolls goes on a fantastical adventure through the house and out into the garden. They soon escape the clutches of the toy dinosaur and the snapping jaws of the oven-glove crocodile, but then a very real pair of scissors threatens. The Paper Dolls is a stunning, rhythmical story of childhood, memory and the power of imagination from the author of The Gruffalo, and illustrating talent Rebecca Cobb. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'My journey'

My journey (2013)

Penguin

In July 2009, Jim Stynes was diagnosed with cancer and given less than a year to live. The diagnosis caught him by surprise - he was 42, healthy, fit - and he didn't have time for illness: he was director of a foundation for young people, president of Melbourne Football Club, father of two primary school-aged kids, husband of Sam. Knowing his odds weren't good, but with so much to lose, Jim put everything he had into trying to beat the disease. He was well equipped to beat the odds - he'd been getting the most out of himself in every aspect of life since his childhood in Dublin. Jim's ability to use mind over matter and his will to succeed gave him two extra years on the prognosis. He had more than 25 tumours removed from his brain and stomach, and defied expectations time and time again. This book is Jim's legacy. Unflinching in its detail, Jim talks about what he found out about himself when things were at their worst - about what really counts when you're stacking it all up. It's a moving, inspiring story of a life lived fearlessly. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Worms on parachutes. Mystical allies in my cancer survival'

Worms on parachutes. Mystical allies in my cancer survival (2013)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

I was diagnosed with Triple Negative Breast Cancer on the 15th June 2007. I remember that day so vividly. It will be ingrained in my memory forever as it is the day I felt my perfect little world crumble. I remember hearing those terrifying words, “I’m sorry it’s cancer” and falling to pieces. I hollered as my mind froze and my body went numb. I was frightened, felt incredibly vulnerable and my greatest fear stared me in the face. I could potentially die, and leave behind my two beautiful daughters and a husband who is also my best friend, and the person I love to have at my side. I’m pleased to report those initial feelings softened as time passed. Now it is important to share my story to give hope, encouragement and inspiration to others faced with a life-threatening illness. I believe that sharing stories helps to inspire those who are touched by cancer. You seek hope reassurance that treatments can be very successful today. Breast Cancer isn’t the only illness I have overcome. I had a near death experience in Africa as a child, I was an accident-prone youngster and the sickly one in my family. I was diagnosed with Hodgkin Disease, a cancer of the lymphatic system at 16, yes, I’m very greedy one cancer wasn’t enough. Fingers crossed cancer will leave me alone now. I will not give in! However, it is quite possible that radiation treatment for that cancer caused my breast cancer 20 years later. Yet from all the mishaps I experienced, I walk away truly blessed that people who entered my life as strangers ended up making the greatest impact on my life. What makes Worms On Parachutes special is that I was inspired to write after receiving outstanding medical care. Therefore, it deals with relationships from medical professionals to family and friends so openly and honestly. It is an insightful read that I believe will be helpful and supportive to anyone experiencing cancer today in whatever role you play. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Emotional support through breast cancer. The alternative handbook'

Emotional support through breast cancer. The alternative handbook (2013)

Radcliffe Publishing

This compassionate guide presents an array of new perspectives on the emotional effects of breast cancer and includes many personal testimonies from women who have been diagnosed with this disease. Written by a breast cancer survivor and practising psychologist, it shares practical ideas to help support sufferers at all stages, be it at diagnosis, during treatment or during life after the initial treatments are over. The concise, easy-to-read format includes exercises to develop an acceptance of thoughts and feelings, whilst the individual accounts validate the multitude of emotions felt by sufferers. It is a must for all breast cancer patients and sufferers, their families and friends. Its real-life approach, using first hand accounts, is also highly recommended for all health and social care professionals wanting a fresh approach to managing the emotional impacts of breast cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The hare who lost her hair'

The hare who lost her hair (2013)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

This one-of-a-kind story is a message of hope for young children and families who are undergoing chemotherapy or any difficult struggle. Without words like cancer and chemo, the kid-friendly tale follows a brave hare on her courageous journey to overcome illness. A mysterious, healing stream offers the potential to get well, but there are surprising side effects that will challenge the hare's strength and determination. This book is about believing wishes can come true even in the most extreme circumstances. Ideal for early stage cancers due to the message of survival. Perfect for pairing with honest discussions about your personal situation. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Expected death at 03:45. A love story'

Expected death at 03:45. A love story (2013)

Julia Dansie

Julia Dansie writes about her experiences of looking after an ex-partner and friend who had breast cancer. It is written as a diary covering 20 months during which the two central characters travel an extraordinary journey, unimagined at the time of inception.

Cover image of 'Suzie goes to a funeral'

Suzie goes to a funeral (2013)

The Choir Press

Join Suzie as she goes to Grandma's funeral and says goodbye. Suzie can help explain to a child who may be anxious about going to a funeral for the first time. A simple story to help and show what they might experience on this sad day. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Always and forever'

Always and forever (2013)

Picture Corgi

When Fox dies the rest of his family are absolutely distraught. How will Mole, Otter and Hare go on without their beloved friend? But, months later, Squirrel reminds them all of how funny Fox used to be, and they realise that Fox is still there in their hearts and memories. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'What not to say to a cancer patient. How to talk about cancer and create a supportive network'

What not to say to a cancer patient. How to talk about cancer and create a supportive network (2013)

Self-published using CustomWorthy

A four-year survivor of stage IV papillary thyroid cancer, Paul Bishop offers the newly diagnosed practical advice to effectively manage their energy, resources, and emotions. To those around them he shares an inside perspective into the thoughts, hopes, and fears from the patient's point of view; and provides helpful suggestions for how one can support them. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'My parent has cancer and it really sucks. Real-life advice from real-life teens'

My parent has cancer and it really sucks. Real-life advice from real-life teens (2013)

Sourcebooks Fire

A book especially for the most forgotten family member when cancer strikes a parent: teens It s estimated that one million teens have a parent or close relative with cancer -- and it really sucks. Which is why father-daughter team Mark and Maya Silver, who was a teenager when her mother was diagnosed with cancer, have written a book of advice and support specifically for the underserved teenage audience. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Anthem for Jackson Dawes'

Anthem for Jackson Dawes (2013)

Bloomsbury Children's Books

Megan Bright and Jackson Dawes are two teenagers who first meet each other on the hospital ward where they are both being treated for cancer. Megan is scared and worried about her illness, but Jackson seems to be an old hand, having been on the ward for ages. And everybody loves Jackson! He is a whirlwind of life and energy, warmth and sparkle. Megan will need to borrow some of Jackson's extraordinary optimism to face her and Jackson's future. A moving story of first love and a remarkably powerful debut novel. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer that wouldn't go away: a story for kids about metastatic cancer'

The cancer that wouldn't go away: a story for kids about metastatic cancer (2013)

Lulu.com

The cancer that wouldn't go away is a groundbreaking book, written especially for the child whose parent is living with metastatic cancer. This sensitively written tale uses a gentle, yet realistic approach to help children ages 4-8 face the unique uncertainties of life with incurable cancer. Unlike stories about early-stage cancer, after which the parent is cured and life goes back to normal, for the family in this story, life has irrevocably changed. The future is uncertain. But love and laughter remain constant, as they take life one day at a time. Includes a comprehensive guide ("How to use this book") for parents and professionals, written by child trauma psychologist. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The end of your life book club'

The end of your life book club (2013)

Two Roads

When New York publisher Will Schwalbe’s mother was diagnosed with cancer, he went with her to her treatments. To while away the time in the hospital they distracted themselves with talk of the books they’d read and shared and recommended and, in Will’s case, sometimes pretended to read. But while you might pretend to a bookseller you’ve read a book you don’t pretend to your mother who is dying of cancer. So they read and re-read and explored that particular bond of books they’d always shared. Thus was born a very special book club with just two members: a mother and a son. The ones they choose range from classic to popular, from fantastic to spiritual, and we hear their passion for reading and their love for each other in their intimate and searching discussions. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Eek! My mummy has breast cancer'

Eek! My mummy has breast cancer (2013)

Club Books

When my mum was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012 it literally rocked my world, the world of my family, and the world of our friends. I searched everywhere looking for information about breast cancer that teenagers could understand and relate to - I couldn't find any. I decided if I couldn't find any books about breast cancer that I, as a teenager, could understand, I would have to write my own book from my experience on dealing with a loved one who has been diagnosed with cancer and in the hope others could find useful that I struggled to find originally. This is what I put together and for all teenagers and young people out there I hope you find this book useful, helpful and most of all: comforting. Emma Sutherland. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'My left boob. A cancer diary'

My left boob. A cancer diary (2013)

Book Guild Publishing

Diagnosed with breast cancer in her fifties, award-winning actress and glamour girl-about-town Sally Farmiloe-Neville decided to keep a diary. This is the frank and honest account of her fight to beat the tumour within, retain as much of her left breast as possible - and carry on working meanwhile. Filled with helpful advice to fellow sufferers based on her own experiences, needle-phobic Sally documents her treatment as she goes through the horrors of chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy, helped by a healer, a hypnotherapist and a special diet. When her trademark 'big' hair falls out she reveals how she coped by getting ‘Crystal’, a long blonde NHS wig that wowed every man she met. Her family and friends - including many famous household names - are by her side throughout, but many of them have fought their own battles with the big C and Sally documents their stories, too. Always upbeat, never sorry for herself, this is the courageous tale of one woman's struggle to regain her health. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'How to feel better. Practical ways to recover from illness and injury'

How to feel better. Practical ways to recover from illness and injury (2013)

Piatkus (Little, Brown Book Group)

In days gone by, people understood that a knock to your health takes its toll on your emotions, your relationships, your morale, your 'spirit'. But these days, we think that if the doctor has waved you off, then you are 'better'. If only it were this simple. The truth is that when your body takes a serious knock so does your mind - your thoughts and feelings. Often people feel worried, confused, lonely, depressed, unsupported or overwhelmed. You may be grappling with ongoing physical challenges: disability, pain, treatment side effects, sleep problems and fatigue. And you may have practical concerns over finances or work - or may simply be trying to 'adjust'. That's when this new book, from the authors of The Cancer Survivor's Companion (highly commended by the BMA and winner of the Guild of Health Writers' Best Health Book 2012), will prove invaluable. It offers simple, practical ways to find a path through the space between illness and health. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Nourish. The cancer care cookbook'

Nourish. The cancer care cookbook (2013)

Penny Brohn Cancer Care

Eating well is important when you are living with cancer. Research proves that what you eat can protect you against cancer as well as having a crucial impact before, during and after treatment. But often you may feel too tired, ill or stressed to prepare a balanced and nutritious meal, or you may not feel like eating at all. Don't worry -help is at hand. Nourish, brought to you by the team at Penny Brohn Cancer Care, shows you how to create simple meals, snacks and drinks that are packed with nutrients to support your body. And if you're cooking for a loved one you can rest assured that you will be providing the best possible meals to make them feel better. In Nourish you will find over 70 easy to prepare recipes that incorporate nutrient rich foods to support your body, optimize your enjoyment of food and benefit your health. Whether you are undergoing treatment, have opted to eat healthier as a preventative measure or are supporting someone through cancer and wish to provide nourishing dishes for them, this book will be your culinary guide. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Living with cancer. The year when even the dog got cancer'

Living with cancer. The year when even the dog got cancer (2013)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

How do you live with cancer, day by day, month by month, year by year? With medical advances, this is what many of us are now doing. In the UK alone, by 2020, it is estimated 50% of people will experience cancer either as a patient or a carer. And this is being repeated all around the world. Living with cancer - The year when even the dog got cancer gives an inspirational insight into how one family dealt with four cases of cancer being treated at the same time over one year. Written as a memoir by the carer who can only watch and be supportive as her loved ones go through the various treatments and their side effects, it brings into reality the true emotional cost of "living with cancer". It does so with heart-warming honesty and a huge amount of humour. It will make you cry. It will make you giggle, but more than anything, it will give you hope. Living with Cancer - The Year When Even The Dog Got Cancer will show you that this frightening illness can be survived and the joy of life can go on. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'I felt a right one... and now I feel a right one again'

I felt a right one... and now I feel a right one again (2013)

Matador

“Whilst in the bath I lay back and take a look at my 'bigger than I would really like' body and focus on my chest. My G cup breasts are not difficult to miss, even with my poor eyesight, but what I see makes me sit up straight. It looks like my right nipple is 'not on straight'. I put my glasses on and have a really good look, then start to gently feel my whole right breast. I feel the left one for good measure and can definitely detect a lump on the right side...” This is the true story of Karen Tighe, an ordinary woman, and her journey through discovery, diagnosis, treatment and reconstruction. Amusing and thoughtfully written, it is particularly helpful in describing the physical, emotional and psychological processes that a patient can go through - and how that impacts upon their life, and that of their family. Karen's aim in writing the book was to make cancer less frightening and anyone who is either suffering from cancer, or knows someone who is, will find the book to be of great help. Karen Tighe is donating the profits from her book to St Luke's Hospice and Breast Cancer Care. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cellmates. Our lessons in cancer, life, love and loss'

Cellmates. Our lessons in cancer, life, love and loss (2013)

Saraband

I'm Rose. John and I shared nearly eight years of our lives together. For the last three years of our relationship cancer anchored us together. That's not as grim as it might sound. This is our story. A story of how two ordinary people live with the diagnosis, the check-ups, the disappointments, the relief, the questions, the answers, the operations, the recovery, the emergencies, the denial, the acceptance, the anger, the pain, the loss, the love, the fear, the frustration - and the happiness. Shortly before he died, John made Rose promise to share their story - to tell what they had learned, practically and emotionally, and convey the hope they found even in the darkest of times. He had discovered her hidden stash of letters and diary entries, which she'd been writing to keep herself sane, neither censoring nor intending them to be read. The result is an astonishing, searingly honest, real-time account that reveals our profound capacity for love and how the human spirit can endure the most harrowing of tests to emerge dauntless, flying free. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Chemo cookery club'

Chemo cookery club (2013)

John Blake Publishing

Chemo Cookery Club is packed with delicious recipes to help make everyday food a positive part of life for cancer sufferers and their carers. With tempting treats and healthy food ideas, the emphasis is on the nutritional values that can make a difference, but most importantly this is a book that lifts the spirits - especially when food and diet can become a bit tricky. If you or someone you love are going through treatment, this book will help you create delicious meals and snacks that tantalise the tastebuds no matter how experienced - or otherwise - you are in the kitchen. Penny Ericson, experienced cook and carer, celebrates everyday meals and how they contribute to wellness, both physically and emotionally. If you're struggling with loss of appetite, wondering how to get more iron into your diet, wanting to relieve 'metal mouth' or dismayed that the foods you used to love now seem boring and tasteless as a result of treatment, Penny can help. Nutritional information and recipe analysis has been contributed by leading cancer research dietician Barbara Parry MSc PD, and the book has been enthusiastically endorsed by major cancer charities. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Gift of time'

Gift of time (2013)

Constable

An heartbreakingly honest and deeply moving memoir in the words of the son, his wife and his mother of her battle with cancer, from one of the UK's best loved travel writers. When his mother Joan was diagnosed with terminal cancer, Rory MacLean and his wife Katrin took her into their home. For five months, as their life fragmented and turned inward, they fought both to resist and to accept the inevitable. Each gave vent to their emotions in different ways, but all three kept a diary. Heartbreakingly honest and deeply moving, Gift of Time is the story of those days, in the words of a son, his wife and his mother. Woven together into a poignant meditation on life and death, they illuminate the courage and dignity of one woman who confronted what we all must face. Threaded through with wisdom and guilt, anger and acceptance, the story is punctuated by a family wedding and the hope of new life, by bin-bags of old letters and books rediscovered, by the end of winter and the first signs of spring. Powerful, raw and urgent, this slender volume is above all a celebration of life. Capturing every moment of beauty and pain it acknowledges that what survives all of us is love. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Mum's way'

Mum's way (2013)

Simon & Schuster UK

Angie and Ian were childhood sweethearts, Angie adored kids and, as one of eight children himself, Ian was only too happy to have as many as they could. After their marriage they had three sons in quick succession. But then, aged just thirty one, Angie was diagnosed with breast cancer and the couple had to accept they might not be able to have any more. Five years on, though, with Angie well again they went on to have five more. But in 2007, Angie had a shadow on her lung and it was the return of the original breast cancer she thought she had beaten. It seemed the disease had returned to tear their world apart again. Though Ian searched tirelessly for cures, Angie practised acceptance. She wouldn't live to see her children grow up. Raising eight children would be a big job for any couple; to raise them alone, without their mother, an almost Herculean feat. But this was exactly what Angie wanted Ian to be able to do. So in the last months of her life, Angie compiled a list of 'rules' to guide Ian in the future, and put him on an intensive training course, so he could learn all the skills he would need. She taught him how to make her special chicken curry, how to soothe away their hurts, pack their lunchboxes with all their favourites and do all the little things she'd done for them so unthinkingly. And Ian knew he wasn't just doing this for the children. He was doing it so his beloved wife could be comforted by knowing that he had the tools to bring their children up her way. Finally, inevitably, came the hardest task of all. Angie, the job done, had to find the courage to let them go, and Ian and the children the courage to carry on without her. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The pink moon lovelies. Empowering stories of survival'

The pink moon lovelies. Empowering stories of survival (2013)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

The Pink Moon Lovelies are members of the Facebook group Beyond the Pink Moon, named after Nicki Boscia Durlester’s memoir that intimately chronicles her journey after a breast cancer diagnosis. Nicki created the group to provide an active forum for discussion to raise awareness about the BRCA gene and breast and ovarian cancer. She never dreamed her homespun story would travel around the globe and Beyond the Pink Moon would become a support group for people from all walks of life coming together to lift each other up with inspiration, humor, faith and love. With Lovelies in Australia, Canada, England, France, Ireland, Israel, Mexico, Namibia, New Zealand, Singapore, Slovakia, South Africa, Sweden, Tasmania and the USA, Nicki, a BRCA2 survivor, and fellow moderator, Melissa Johnson Voight, a BRCA1 previvor, whose journey of steadfast faith and courage of conviction is included in this book, have encouraged their members to tell their stories with one goal in mind, to save lives. With a Foreword written by renowned breast surgeon, Dr. Kristi Funk, this riveting collection of 50 stories includes: the unflinching account of Barbie Ritzco, a United States Marine who kept silent about discovering a lump in her breast in order to deploy with her unit to Afghanistan, putting her country before her health, the moving story of Ally Durlester, Nicki’s daughter, a 25 year old BRCA2 previvor who will undergo prophylactic surgery to try to avoid the same fate as her mother, grandmother and six great-aunts who all had breast, ovarian or fallopian tube cancer, the frustrating story of Erika Grogin Lange, an Israeli Lovely and mother of five, whose nagging symptoms of fatigue, nausea and bloating went undiagnosed for months until she heard the shocking news that she had Stage III ovarian cancer, and the unpredictable journey of Susan Long Martucci, a two-time breast cancer survivor, disease free for 13 years, blindsided by another diagnosis. She is the beacon of hope who coined the term Pink Moon Lovelies. Each story is compelling and has an important message to impart. The Pink Moon Lovelies, Empowering Stories of Survival concludes with the story of the incomparable May Smith, the 32 year old South African Lovely who left a legacy of extraordinary courage, grace and love. Hers was a life well lived. When May sadly passed away on July 22, 2012 from breast cancer she left the Pink Moon Lovelies with one final message filled with wisdom and advice beyond her years. H

Cover image of 'The dog, the chick and the reindeer. The story of a family living with cancer'

The dog, the chick and the reindeer. The story of a family living with cancer (2013)

Apollo Publishing

In 2004 my mother asked us to donate to the Macmillan team in lieu of a present. It is ironic that she then developed and survived endometrial cancer in 2006 and was diagnosed with and died from ovarian cancer in 2012, especially as the Macmillan team supported us to keep her in the home she loved right to the end. The story tells of the effects of both cancers on Mum and the rest of the family. Naturally there were sad times and some excruciatingly painful and stressful times but there were also some funny and touching moments. Audrey, Mum's sister was coincidentally diagnosed with oesophageal cancer and at one point they were in different wards at opposite ends of the same hospital. The day we were told of Mum’s diagnosis, we wheeled her down to sit with Audrey and they held hands and hugged, one in a wheelchair and the other hooked up to all kinds of machinery. Audrey died thirteen days after mum. There is no doubt that my mother loved her family - she had nearly ninety children, grandchildren, great grandchildren and great, great grandchildren, both biological and adopted; whilst the story is written from my perspective, I wasn't the only one to suffer and it could easily have been written by thirty or forty other people. When I found out mum had a terminal illness I made up my mind to take her back to her home, which is the only place she wanted to be; some people thought I was mad but we had a dedicated team of family and were lucky to be further supported by her GP, the DN’s and Macmillan team. I organised weekly rotas to ensure 24 hour care: The book tells how we coped with this and of my panic the day I found out the Macmillan support team didn’t have any sitters for the following week. It also portrays the “normal” things we did along as we rode our six year emotional roller coaster, such as going on holidays and dealing with other family crises. The last twelve months before her death were intolerable. The last six months a nightmare, and the ten weeks between diagnosis and her passing were hell on earth but we had some laughs, we cried and we sang songs. A few weeks before she died, as my daughter entered the room Mum was playing a game with my younger grandchildren, throwing the tiny purple chick to each of them in turn and giggling along with them, its tail flashing as though it too was enjoying the fun. I initially wrote the book to help me deal with my own grief, stress and feelings of guilt that I was glad she had finally let g

Cover image of 'What does dead mean? A book for young children to help explain death and dying'

What does dead mean? A book for young children to help explain death and dying (2012)

Jessica Kingsley Publishers

What Does Dead Mean? is a beautifully illustrated book that guides children gently through 17 of the 'big' questions they often ask about death and dying. Questions such as 'Is being dead like sleeping?', 'Why do people have to die?' and 'Where do dead people go?' are answered simply, truthfully and clearly to help adults explain to children what happens when someone dies. Prompts encourage children to explore the concepts by talking about, drawing or painting what they think or feel about the questions and answers. Suitable for children aged 4+, this is an ideal book for parents and carers to read with their children, as well as teachers, therapists and counsellors working with young children. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Topic of cancer. A positive and supportive guide for patients, families and friends'

Topic of cancer. A positive and supportive guide for patients, families and friends (2012)

Upfront Publishing

Being diagnosed with cancer is a shock for patient, family and friends. But modern medicine ensures that many people with cancer can be cured or go on to enjoy many more years of active and fulfilling life. Fiona Castle experienced living alongside a cancer patient when her husband, Roy, was diagnosed. In this positive and informative guide she combines the practical and emotional aspects to provide resourceful and supportive help for anyone coping with the illness. She includes: Taking it in and asking the right questions; Understanding the facts; How to get information and support; Treatments and their side effects; Living with cancer and the needs of carers; How to help yourself with complementary therapies; Terminal cancer, the fears and preparations; Getting back to ordinary life. All proceeds from the sale of this book will go to The Roy Castle Fund for Cancer Research UK. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Tallulah tumour, friend or foe. A personal insight into a battle with a brain tumour'

Tallulah tumour, friend or foe. A personal insight into a battle with a brain tumour (2012)

Memoirs Publishing

Fiona Goldsby has emerged triumphant from the terrifying experience of suffering a serious brain tumour. She found very little written material was available to help her in her battle, so she has written Tallulah Tumour, Friend or Foe? to help others dealing with a similar diagnosis. It is intended to provide information about what the patient may expect, with hints and tips to deal with the various side effects. The information in the book will not only be helpful to patients but to caregivers and family members. And as you may guess from the title, there is plenty of humour as well. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Love for now'

Love for now (2012)

Impress Books

The sun has just popped out, after a heavy shower; the washing line a string of pearls. It's time to live. On Valentine s Day, 2006, Anthony Wilson was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a cancer of the lymphatic system. He was 42. In this journal of the days that followed he contemplates love, family and mortality alongside celebrations of Peter Osgood, Ivor Cutler and cooking chicken while listening to funk. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Riddance'

Riddance (2012)

Worple

On Valentine's Day, 2006, Anthony Wilson was formally diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a cancer of the lymphatic system. 'Beginning with what happened', the poems in Riddance chart the progress of his treatment for this disease, from initial diagnosis to the uncertain territory of remission. Even more essentially, they recover and celebrate all that is most fundamental and affirming about the act of living. (Publisher)

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