Publications directory

Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 7 days a week, 8am-8pm

The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 342

Cover image of 'Storm in a D cup! One woman’s journey through breast cancer'

Storm in a D cup! One woman’s journey through breast cancer (2017)

Debbie Paton Publishing

Storm in a D Cup! is a blow-by-blow account of Debbie Paton's journey through breast cancer. It is a candid account of the year between her initial diagnosis and her full recovery. When she was first diagnosed, Debbie wrote notes in a diary, but her daughter Georgia dragged her into the 21st century by convincing her to write a blog that could be shared with a wider audience. The blog soon became Debbie's cathartic writing. It gave her the freedom to express the rollercoaster of emotions as they happened, the good, the bad and the irrational. She shared her entries on social media for her friends and family to follow – it took the pressure off endless update phone calls! This is a no holds barred account of the mix of emotions, the highs and lows of the journey. It is not about doom and gloom, but rather the realities of the journey and the experiences Debbie had along the way. It is at times poignant and highly sensitive, at others, filled with laughter and fun. It was a year that shaped her life into something different. It is Debbie’s hope that her experiences can help others by alleviating some of the fear surrounding a breast cancer diagnosis. If she could have read a similar blog before starting her own journey, Debbie feels certain she would’ve been far less fearful of what lay ahead. Yes, everyone's path is different, but there are elements of her experience that will resonate with others in the same position. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'With the end in mind. Dying, death and wisdom in an age of denial'

With the end in mind. Dying, death and wisdom in an age of denial (2017)

William Collins

In this unprecedented book, palliative medicine pioneer Dr Kathryn Mannix explores the biggest taboo in our society and the only certainty we all share: death. Told through a series of beautifully crafted stories taken from nearly four decades of clinical practice, her book answers the most intimate questions about the process of dying with touching honesty and humanity. She makes a compelling case for the therapeutic power of approaching death not with trepidation but with openness, clarity and understanding. With the End in Mind is a book for us all: the grieving and bereaved, ill and healthy. Open these pages and you will find stories about people who are like you, and like people you know and love. You will meet Holly, who danced her last day away; Eric, the retired head teacher who, even with Motor Neurone Disease, gets things done; loving, tender-hearted Nelly and Joe, each living a lonely lie to save their beloved from distress; and Sylvie, 19, dying of leukaemia, sewing a cushion for her mum to hug by the fire after she has died. These are just four of the book’s thirty-odd stories of normal humans, dying normal human deaths. They show how the dying embrace living not because they are unusual or brave, but because that’s what humans do. By turns touching, tragic, at times funny and always wise, they offer us illumination, models for action, and hope. Read this book and you’ll be better prepared for life as well as death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Making peace with the end of life. A clear and comforting guide to help you live well to the last'

Making peace with the end of life. A clear and comforting guide to help you live well to the last (2017)

Creative Pumpkin Publishing

From GP and hospice doctor Patrick Fitzgerald and bestselling author Sarah Rayner (Making Friends with Anxiety, One Moment, One Morning) comes a warm and wise companion to help support you and those caring for you in the last months, weeks and days of life. From the shock of diagnosis, through treatment options and symptom control to the process of dying itself, Making Peace with the End of Life tackles these sensitive issues with compassion and honesty. Full of practical advice and important contact information, it will also help to demystify how the NHS and Social Services work, so you can access the best support more easily. And, drawing on Patrick’s extensive clinical experience, it also looks at how communicating your wishes to those involved in your care can give a feeling of safety and control over whatever happens in the future. There are tips on self-nurturing using diet, light exercise and alternative therapies, plus guidance on how to care for your own mental health – including advice for carers. And for those who are anxious about what lies ahead, patient stories and quotes from those who’ve been there help to explain what to expect, thereby easing worry and panic so you feel less alone. Offset by Sarah’s joyful illustrations, the result is a clear and compassionate guide that aims to make these complex and distressing issues less confusing and overwhelming, so each individual can live the life they have left with a greater sense of comfort and peace. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Dear cancer, love Victoria: a mum’s diary of hope'

Dear cancer, love Victoria: a mum’s diary of hope (2017)

Trapeze (Orion)

Renowned as a much-loved and highly respected BBC journalist, Victoria Derbyshire has spent 20 years finding the human story behind the headlines. In 2015 she found herself at the heart of the news, with a devastating breast cancer diagnosis. With honesty and openness, she decided to live out her treatment and recovery in the spotlight in a series of video diaries that encouraged thousands to seek diagnosis and help. Victoria has kept a diary since she was nine years old and in DEAR CANCER, LOVE VICTORIA she shares her day to day experiences of life following her diagnosis and coming to terms with a future that wasn't planned. From the moment she woke up to find her right breast had collapsed, to telling her partner and children, through to mastectomy and chemotherapy. From wearing a wig to work and hiding it from her colleagues, to the relief and joy of finishing treatment before immediately flying to Glasgow to present a debate on the European Referendum. By sharing her story, she became the person that mums, daughters, sisters, husbands, boyfriends and family members contacted to thank as they tried to find ways to cope with their own and their loved ones' prognosis, and needed to know that they were not alone. Victoria's story is an affecting and at times heart-breaking one but it is so often laugh-out-loud too. Moving, wonderfully heartwarming and ultimately uplifting, this is a powerful account of a brave struggle told with honesty, courage and emotion that gives strength to anyone touched by cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'There is no good card for this: what to say and do when life is scary, awful, and unfair to people you love'

There is no good card for this: what to say and do when life is scary, awful, and unfair to people you love (2017)

HarperOne

The creator of the viral hit "Empathy Cards" teams up with a compassion expert to produce a visually stunning and groundbreaking illustrated guide to help you increase your emotional intelligence and learn how to offer comfort and support when someone you know is in pain. When someone you know is hurting, you want to let her know that you care. But many people don’t know what words to use—or are afraid of saying or doing the wrong thing. This thoughtful, instructive guide, from empathy expert Dr. Kelsey Crowe and greeting card maverick Emily McDowell, blends well-researched, actionable advice with the no-nonsense humor and the signature illustration style of McDowell's immensely popular Empathy Cards, to help you feel confident in connecting with anyone experiencing grief, loss, illness, or any other difficult situation. Written in a how-to, relatable, we’ve-all-been-that-deer-in-the-headlights kind of way, There Is No Good Card for This isn’t a spiritual treatise on how to make you a better person or a scientific argument about why compassion matters. It is a helpful illustrated guide to effective compassion that takes you, step by step by step, past the paralysis of thinking about someone in a difficult time to actually doing something (or nothing) with good judgment instead of fear. There Is No Good Card for This features workbook exercises, sample dialogs, and real-life examples from Dr. Crowe’s research, including her popular "Empathy Bootcamps" that give people tools for building relationships when it really counts. Whether it’s a coworker whose mother has died, a neighbor whose husband has been in a car accident, or a friend who is seriously ill, There Is No Good Card for This teaches you how to be the best friend you can be to someone in need. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Hug everyone you know: a year of community, courage, and cancer'

Hug everyone you know: a year of community, courage, and cancer (2017)

She Writes Press

Antoinette Martin believed herself to be a healthy and sturdy woman--that is, until she received a Stage 1 breast cancer diagnosis. Cancer is scary enough for the brave, but for a wimp like Martin, it was downright terrifying. Martin had to swallow waves of nausea at the thought of her body being poisoned, and frequently fainted during blood draws and infusions. To add to her terror, cancer suddenly seemed to be all around her. In the months following her diagnosis, a colleague succumbed to cancer, and five of her friends were also diagnosed. Though tempted, Martin knew she could not hide in bed for ten months. She had a devoted husband, daughters, and a tribe of friends and relations. Along with work responsibilities, there were graduations, anniversaries, and roller derby bouts to attend, not to mention a house to sell and a summer of beach-bumming to enjoy. In order to harness support without scaring herself or anyone else, she journaled her experiences and began to e-mail the people who loved her--the people she called My Everyone. She kept them informed and reminded all to 'hug everyone you know' at every opportunity. Reading the responses became her calming strategy. Ultimately, with the help of her community, Martin found the courage within herself to face cancer with perseverance and humor. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Tommy v cancer.  One man's battle against the big C'

Tommy v cancer. One man's battle against the big C (2017)

Independently published

On Thursday, 10th of March 2016, I returned home from a hospital appointment and broke the news to my wife and children. I had throat cancer. Stage four. Inoperable. Desperately needing some way to make sense of my situation, I set up a blog to chart my battle against the disease. I hoped it would allow me to understand more about this thing inside me, and what I would have to go through in terms of treatment to try to eradicate it. I also thought it might help other people who found themselves in similar circumstances. I made a promise to my readers to be open and honest all the way. I wouldn't hold anything back, no matter how unpleasant. Now, over a year later, I have adapted that blog into this book. It details my journey from when I first realised that something was wrong, through the intense courses of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, to where I am today. To say that journey was difficult is a vast understatement. The side effects of my treatment utterly kicked my arse, causing me to lose over half my bodyweight and fall seriously ill with double pneumonia and sepsis. Totally unresponsive, I was rushed into intensive care where the doctors told my family that, if they couldn't stabilise me, I had approximately two hours left to live. One option was to put me into a medically induced coma, although the chances were high that I would never emerge from it. Imagine someone telling you that about your loved one as they lie there, unconscious and struggling to breathe. Cancer is an invader that affects more than just the patient. Everyone suffers - spouses, siblings, children, extended family, friends. Even, as I was to discover, strangers from all over the world. I was overwhelmed with the love and kindness of almost everyone who contacted me, but I also suffered terrible abuse at the hands of online trolls. I should warn you that parts of this book do not make for easy reading. I kept my promise to be honest, and wrote many of the blog entries when I was depressed and scared, certain I wouldn't live to see another dawn. I convinced myself that I would quickly perish, leaving my wife and two sons - then aged 9 and 17 - alone, and with no-one to protect them or provide for them. I wouldn't get to see them grow up, develop into young men, and eventually have children of their own. The prospect terrified me. For those of you who followed my blog and read the posts as I uploaded them, you haven't seen everything. This book c

Cover image of 'The breast reconstruction guidebook'

The breast reconstruction guidebook (2017)

Johns Hopkins University Press

For a decade The Breast Reconstruction Guidebook has been the best resource on this topic for women who have had a mastectomy. Equal parts science and support, it is filled with stories that illustrate the emotional and physical components of breast reconstruction. Readers will find advice about choosing a doctor and a procedure, insurance and payment issues, how to prepare for surgery, and what to expect during recovery. Expert commentary by physicians and insights from patients inform this book, as does the exhaustive research by the author, a two-time breast cancer survivor who has twice had reconstructive surgery. New in this edition are discussions of: the pros and cons of saline and silicone implants; solutions for post-lumpectomy cosmetic problems; new immediate-delayed reconstruction when post-mastectomy radiation may be required; the benefits and limitations of nipple-sparing mastectomy; considerations for direct-to-implant reconstruction; newly developed tissue flap procedures; who can best apply nipple and areola tattoos and why tattoos may not last; enriching fat with stem cells so it stays in the breast; patient-controlled tissue expansion; how insurance and health care reform affect reconstruction. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer whisperer. How to let cancer heal your life'

The cancer whisperer. How to let cancer heal your life (2016)

Coronet (Hodder & Stoughton)

This book does not offer a cure for cancer. It offers a cure for your fear of cancer. Both memoir and self-help book, this is the remarkable chronicle of a passage from 'terminal' diagnosis to exuberant wellness in just a few months. The Cancer Whisperer reverses our traditional adversarial relationship with cancer by teaching us how to listen to it; how to be healed by it as well as seek to cure it; and how to be emotionally free of illness even when physically curtailed. Living on the frontier between her fierce will to live and necessary willingness to die, Sophie - now thriving with cancer - shares her journey with searing honesty, unapologetic vulnerability and intelligent pragmatism. Alongside rare insights into a condition now affecting approximately one in three people, she challenges the mental conditioning we need to overcome to redefine our narratives about cancer. As 'the cancer whisperer', she offers a groundbreaking practical guide that will encourage cancer patients to: Direct their own treatment while preserving their personhood in a system that tends to see them as patients more than people. Engage with fear, anger and grief in healthy and healing ways instead of toughing it out, trying to be positive or collapsing into despair. Radically shift from being a cancer victim to a cancer listener-to seeing cancer less as a disease than as a symptom of other underlying causes, and engaging proactively with whatever changes it calls on them to make. Discover what the author calls 'the whispering, the reaching into a well of darkness and finding your hands painted with light'. Inspired, wise and moving, this book is as unflinching as Lisa Lynch's The C Word, as uplifting as Kris Carr's Crazy, Sexy Cancer, and carries us to a new threshold in our relationship with cancer, strengthening our ability to meet it with courage, creativity, gratitude and grace. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A whole new me. Getting to the bottom of bowel cancer'

A whole new me. Getting to the bottom of bowel cancer (2016)

Self-published using XLibris

Come with me on a journey to self-love, self-esteem, and self-healing. I share my experiences with you as a survivor of bowel cancer. I will lead you along my journey from crappy to happy, allow you to feel the multitude of emotions associated with recovery, and share insights into my holistic approach to the wonderful and fulfilling life I now live. Let me also share my successful approach to living life to the fullest, accepting myself and allowing only positive people and experiences to enter my universe. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'What doesn’t kill you, makes you stronger'

What doesn’t kill you, makes you stronger (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

“You’ve got cancer” – three little words that can change your life. “What Doesn’t Kill You, Makes You Stronger” is the honest, straight-from-the-heart account of one woman’s experience of hearing these three words. Right from the start, it follows every step of this journey – and it IS a journey – the tears and laughter, the ups and downs and everything in between. There is loads of information available that give you the facts about what it’s like to be diagnosed with cancer, what happens next, what the options are for treatment and a how to have a life alongside a cancer diagnosis. Most of these are written by those who have never had cancer. Not many of them share the emotional and psychological effects that being diagnosed have. This book does. It talks about the real side effects of chemo, the strange things you crave or can’t stand, the powerful friendships that develop and the fierce spirit within, which is determined to beat cancer. It’s not a “poor me” story……it’s a frank and honest account that has one purpose – to help other people who find themselves with a cancer diagnosis, to show them that what they are thinking and feeling is “OK”, that they aren’t alone and that it’s ok to have a laugh. “What Doesn’t Kill You, Makes You Stronger” – very frank, very honest and very true. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The shock factor. Sarah's story – beating breast cancer one day at a time'

The shock factor. Sarah's story – beating breast cancer one day at a time (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

The door handle started to turn and I knew this was the moment that could change my life forever. Mr Mahadev appeared with another staff member. He introduced himself and then introduced Sally, a breast care nurse, and sat down beside me. He started to go through my notes: family history, the results of the mammogram and the biopsy. Then he delivered the devastating news... I’m really sorry but the mammogram has shown two tumours in the left breast. Sarah Pickles was a normal 32-year-old married woman with a young daughter. On 22nd September 2014 her life changed as she was given the devastating news that she had a triple-negative breast cancer. Read about how Sarah dealt with her diagnosis and how she survived cancer as she shares all the high, lows, tears, and laughter of her journey. This honest and raw account of Sarah’s cancer journey also includes lots of information and top tips on diet, exercise, health, and beauty. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'How to help someone with cancer. 70 ways to help cancer patients and their families during cancer treatment'

How to help someone with cancer. 70 ways to help cancer patients and their families during cancer treatment (2016)

Rebel Redd Books

A loved one was recently diagnosed with cancer and you aren't sure the best way to help. Surely there’s something you can do besides bringing a frozen dinner? This book will be your guide to practical ways you can help a cancer patient as they are progressing through treatment. You may feel you don’t have the time, energy or resources to be of much help, but these 70 recommendations will provide affordable and manageable suggestions to help form your action plan. Topics include: -Advice on how to help patients traveling for treatment -Suggestions for both adult and pediatric patients -How to help families and caregivers -What you can do if you live in a different town or state You have the power to make a difference in a cancer patient’s life. These simple suggestions will allow you to help relieve the patient’s worry and frustration, freeing them to focus on rest, gaining strength, and healing during this difficult time. “Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.” Helen Keller (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The way we die now'

The way we die now (2016)

Head of Zeus

We have lost the ability to deal with death. Most of our friends and beloved relations will die in a busy hospital in the care of strangers, doctors and nurses they have known at best for a couple of weeks. They may not even know they are dying, victims of the kindly lie that there is still hope. They are unlikely to see even their family doctor in their final hours, robbed of their dignity and fed through a tube after a long series of excessive and hopeless medical interventions. This is the starting point of Seamus O'Mahony's thoughtful, moving and unforgettable book on the western way of death. Dying has never been more public, with celebrities writing detailed memoirs of their illness, but in private we have done our best to banish all thought of dying and made a good death increasingly difficult to achieve. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Smiles from the clinic. A humorous look at cancer'

Smiles from the clinic. A humorous look at cancer (2016)

Motivational Press, Inc

You may be wondering why a doctor would attempt to write a (supposedly) humorous book about cancer. Well, I have found that too many people, even other physicians, think that working with cancer patients is very serious business and must be pretty depressing work. However, my experience has been quite the opposite. The cancer patients with whom I have had the privilege to work with demonstrate humour, smiles and positivity every day. It helps them face their disease, cope with treatment and get on with their lives in a positive and meaningful way. They are definitely among the most grateful people I have ever met, and working with them has made me a happier and better person. Much of the practice of medicine is about relationships and, as we all know, relationships, at least good relationships, are often filled with humour. Within oncology (the specialty of cancer treatment), just like any other field of medicine, special relationships develop between patients and their physicians, and humour is often involved. That is definitely what I have observed in my clinical practice. This book is dedicated to cancer patients, as well as their families and friends. All the stories are based on my personal experiences and observations over 25 years of medical practice. Believe me, I am not a comedian or humourist - just ask my kids. I would never be able to make up such funny stories myself. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'What is cancer? A book for kids'

What is cancer? A book for kids (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

It is very difficult for a family to explain to a child what cancer is when a loved one has been diagnosed. This book explains to children what cancer is. 

Cover image of 'Thinks itself a hawk. Poems from the University College Hospital Macmillan Cancer Centre, London'

Thinks itself a hawk. Poems from the University College Hospital Macmillan Cancer Centre, London (2016)

Hippocrates Press

Wendy French’s meticulously observed and profoundly moving new collection grew out of a residency with the University College Hospital MacMillan Cancer Centre in London. Working with patients, sharing in their hopes and fears, tracking the everyday endeavours of a vital medical hub, Wendy French found herself drawn into lives in which blood tests, diagnosis, chemotherapy and hope become as much part of the human experience as cappuccino and Vivaldi on the radio. One life, that of Zipora, a Jewish woman whose origins lay in the darkest days of the twentieth century, is chosen for particular attention for its power to place everyday experience in large frames, but also for the brightness with which it reminds us that everyday life is unique and important. Wendy French brings all her gifts of compassion, precision, and feeling yet understated language, to the high task of accompanying the journey we call cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cancer with a small 'c''

Cancer with a small 'c' (2016)

Self-published using WritersWorld

This book follows the journey of my life through approximately a ten-year period during which time I was diagnosed with breast cancer. It contains highs and lows and hopefully will shine a positive light on this disease that will encourage other women.v Although any cancer diagnosis is devastating not only to a patient but also to their family, a positive outlook, a grateful heart and a belief that life can only get better is vital to recovery. There will be readers who understand the attitude that overtook me at the time; my marriage breakdown will resonate with others - just as our reconciliation will also be close to the hearts of some people.I also draw on some hilarious moments, because it wasn't all bad, my cancer attacked me when I was most in need of a break from life. Disastrous, worrying, life threatening and emotionally draining, the story will touch on some very personal, sad moments but also the victorious end when I refuse to even acknowledge that I had cancer. Yes, it was real, but it deserves no place in my life any more and certainly no capital 'c'.A cathartic book for me and hopefully an encouragement to others who may be going through a similar situation to mine, this book is an honest account of how I drove myself to get well again. Ten years on, my life is so different that I hardly recognise the person in the story. But it was me and it is my story. (Author)

Cover image of 'The fabulous woman’s guide through cancer'

The fabulous woman’s guide through cancer (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

"The fabulous woman’s guide through cancer" is for every woman touched by cancer but still determined to feel in control of their life. Giving real advice from a number of fabulous women affected by cancer, it includes tips, examples, stories, memoirs, information and ideas covering everything from post-operation styling, ideas to stay social when you can't go out, dealing with doctors, ways to stay lifted and lots more, all with plenty of kind words and inspiration to keep women on-track during this time. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Living with Timmy'

Living with Timmy (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

The writer’s personal story, who on the threshold of retirement, is diagnosed with a rare brain tumour. How will he cope as he uncovers more and more detail about the tumour? Does he opt for risky brain surgery or for a “watch and wait” strategy? And will his life ever be the same again? Follow his personal journey from diagnosis to the present day in this story. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'In-between days. A memoir about living with cancer'

In-between days. A memoir about living with cancer (2016)

House of Anansi Press

Teva Harrison was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer at the age of 37. In this brilliant and inspiring graphic memoir, she documents through comic illustration and short personal essays what it means to live with the disease. Ultimately redemptive and uplifting, In-Between Days reminds each one of us how beautiful life is, and what a gift. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The truth about cancer'

The truth about cancer (2016)

Blurb

Kelly Strenge has been explaining cancer to children for more than a decade. This edition educates children about cancer in a very honest, light-hearted, and inspiring way. Children will discover: What cancer is and how it is treated; The side effects cancer treatment can have; Who is affected by cancer; Cancer is not contagious; Ways to prevent cancer; Who they can turn to for comfort and to help them cope; Cancer doesn't define a person; There are positive aspects of the journey; and much more. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Davey’s really magic carpet'

Davey’s really magic carpet (2016)

Blue Canoe Books

A beautifully illustrated children's book which takes the reader, aged 4 upwards, on an adventure with Davey and his Really Magic Carpet. Davey's magic carpet was a gift from his daddy as he died, and each thread is made from a memory they had together. It is an uplifting story about making memories as a family, that is valuable and engaging for any child, but especially those preparing for loss or needing support if bereaved. It is soft back, 21cmx21cm and includes 3 activity pages. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'The pink unicorns of male breast cancer'

The pink unicorns of male breast cancer (2016)

Blossom Spring Publishing

Alan Herbert is a West London born, ex forces, motorcycle riding, all action grandfather who now lives in The Netherlands with his family. In 2012, he was diagnosed with breast cancer. Alan vividly describes his battle with cancer and the often absurd situations he finds himself in as he fights not only the killer disease, but also the ignorance borne out of the feminization of breast cancer. Follow Alan’s courageous story that shows not only the determination, but the admirable spirit of a man who battled and survived. An inspirational, gripping, and down-to-earth story written from a man’s point of view in dealing with breast cancer. “Men have breasts too!” (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Dying. A memoir'

Dying. A memoir (2016)

Canongate Books Ltd

At the age of sixty, Cory Taylor was dying of melanoma-related brain cancer. With her illness no longer treatable, she began at the start of 2016 to write about her experiences and, in an extraordinary creative surge, wrote what would become Dying: A Memoir. This is a brief and clear-eyed account of what dying taught Cory: amid the tangle of her feelings, she reflects on the patterns of her life, and remembers the lives and deaths of her parents. She tells us why she would like to be able to choose the circumstances of her own death. Dying is about the vulnerability and strength, courage and humility, anger and acceptance that it takes to live a good life and say goodbye to it in peace. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A series of catastrophes and miracles. A true story of love, science and cancer'

A series of catastrophes and miracles. A true story of love, science and cancer (2016)

National Geographic

After being diagnosed in her early 40s with metastatic melanoma, journalist and mother of two Mary Elizabeth Williams finds herself in a race against the clock. She takes a once-in-a-lifetime chance and joins a clinical trial for immunotherapy, a revolutionary drug regimen that trains the body to vanquish malignant cells. Astonishingly, her cancer disappears entirely in just a few weeks. But at the same time, her best friend embarks on a cancer journey of her own - with very different results. Williams's experiences as a patient and a medical test subject reveal with stark honesty what it takes to weather disease, the extraordinary new developments that are rewriting the rules of science - and the healing power of human connection. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Embroidered cancer comic'

Embroidered cancer comic (2016)

Singing Dragon (Jessica Kingsley)

'Come to bed with me?' 'Huh? No, I'd rather read this book about cancer...' As soon as Bob was diagnosed with aggressive prostate cancer, he and his wife Elizabeth started making cancer jokes to take the edge off of an otherwise frightening situation. A lot of those jokes were about sex. Here, textile artist Elizabeth Shefrin has picked up a needle and thread to share those intimate jokes, revealing how they helped her and her husband to process the realities of cancer treatment. Giving lightness and humour to a rarely discussed topic, this unpretentious and wry embroidered comic will create awareness and discourse around a taboo topic, resonating with others in similar situations and reassuring us that it's ok to laugh. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The best medicine'

The best medicine (2016)

Little Island Books

Philip is twelve years old and life is pretty good. He gets on with his mum and gets by pretty well at school - in spite of girl problems, teacher problems, bully problems and - er - poetry problems. Philip's happy-go-lucky life is disrupted when his mother gets breast cancer. Bad enough that your mother is seriously ill - but could she not have developed a less embarrassing kind of cancer - toe cancer, maybe, or ear cancer? Philip's attempts to cope with his situation are both hilarious and touching. Through it all, he's writing letters to his hero, the comedian Harry Hill, looking for advice. A hilarious take on the unfunny subject of cancer; this book brings one of modern life's most prevalent illnesses into the light and gives it a human face. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'They said I had six months to live. Surviving prostate cancer – 10 years on'

They said I had six months to live. Surviving prostate cancer – 10 years on (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

There are few things in life as shocking as finding out that you are about to die. We all know, of course, that this is an inevitable part of living but we put it out of mind. Yes life will end, but not today, not any time soon. Coming face to face with the reality that it could indeed be sometime soon is just one part of being diagnosed with terminal cancer. There are other things too - coping with treatment, coping with the side effects of treatment, dealing with the reactions of loved ones. Then there is the constant uncertainty of the next blood test, and the difficulty of getting on with everyday life, fearful of what the future might bring. However, the crunch is that this is a terminal illness which can only end one way. This is the story of how I dealt with that... (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Living for a reason - a true cancer journey'

Living for a reason - a true cancer journey (2016)

Austin Macauley

There can be up to 50,000 cases of breast cancer a year in the UK. Ann, in J.A. Prescott's Living for a Reason, is just one. On receiving the news of her condition Ann greets it with the response - You haven't told me that I'm dying yet?' and that is the spirit she carries throughout the book. It is a moving and powerful portrait of a woman who, faced with the vicissitudes of cancer, determines to live life to the full. The book shows Ann as she goes through the stages of cancer and the phases of treatment; the well known mastectomy, the loss of hair, the cosmetic surgery, the chemotherapy and the less well-known side-effects of the drugs. With her condition compounded with the onset of arthritis Ann's determination is inspirational and her story is one of great courage. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'I am here. Stories from a cancer ward'

I am here. Stories from a cancer ward (2016)

Scribe Publications

Looking for more meaning in his work, Johannes Klabbers gave up a tenured academic position to spend his days caring for the sick and dying. He trained as a secular pastoral carer in a cancer hospital, and from the patients there he learned how simply talking and listening can provide comfort: from chatting about the football to discussing life’s meaning and how one prepares for death. I Am Here is a frank, moving, and sometimes funny record of his encounters. It gives an unforgettable insight into the variety of ways people cope with suffering, and suggests how we can support them — through caring, through conversation, and by acknowledging that although we may not be able to answer all of life’s questions, we can face them together. From one of the saddest places comes this powerful affirmation of our capacity for humane care. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Achievement: cancer free for 20 years'

Achievement: cancer free for 20 years (2016)

Achievement Specialists Ltd

Full of tips, tools, techniques, and the secrets Curly Martin used to overcome cancer. How she now lives a passionate, exciting, healthy, wealthy, happy life. Curly Martin was diagnosed with breast cancer, and an aggressive form of lymphatic cancer in 1992 and she was given nine months to live. At that time she became homeless and was unemployed. This book is all about her fascinating and funny 20 year journey from cancer to coaching. Since the terminal diagnosis, she has become an international bestselling author of, The Coaching Handbook Series of books. She is a highly sought-after international speaker, a pioneer of life coach training and the founder of a very successful training company, Achievement Specialists Limited. She intuitively combines her personal experiences with accepted methodologies and cutting edge innovations, to create exciting, very entertaining and effective approaches to living a healthy, happy and successful life. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Fighting spirit. A cancer survivor’s journey'

Fighting spirit. A cancer survivor’s journey (2016)

Austin Macauley

When your enemy is clearly visible, it makes fighting them so much easier, than if they are elusive, such as cancer. Being diagnosed with cancer is everybody's worst nightmare. It is automatically seen as a death sentence. It was no different for Nicolas. His first thoughts were about his mortality, but to help him through his treatment and recovery he used the skills and discipline he had learnt in martial arts. His 'Fighting Spirit' helped him deal with everything that cancer brings with it, along with his faith and support network of family and friends. Rather than focusing on the negative, Nicolas remains positive, using references from some of his favourite films to give him direction, steering him towards a healthy, cancer-free future. The 'Fighting Spirit' helps Nicolas to see his cancer as an enemy that needs to be defeated in battle. He uses his martial arts mindset to visualise and conquer his foe. There will be only one winner. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The buoy projects. A story of breast cancer, bucket-lists, life lessons, Facebook and love'

The buoy projects. A story of breast cancer, bucket-lists, life lessons, Facebook and love (2016)

Self-published using AuthorHouse

Wanda Stairs Howard was many things to many people, but first and foremost, she was a mother, grandmother, and wife. Her daughter Lorna’s book is an account of how Wanda took what was left of her life and squeezed it until the pips squeaked, how she and her tireless Team Wanda celebrated her life whilst she was still living it, and how eventually they set her free for the ultimate journey. This book was written because so many people responded so strongly to her story as it played out through the medium of Facebook, and many of those people asked Lorna to put her mother’s story into print so that she could inspire others who weren’t lucky enough to know her personally. By the end of the book, I hope that readers will feel like they knew Wanda and that many will take comfort and inspiration from her life and death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Rising from the ashes of loss: my voyage through grief'

Rising from the ashes of loss: my voyage through grief (2016)

Ayni Books

Death is inevitable and is an existential fear for all human beings. But it is the devastating thought of departing this earth alone and in agony that renders our inevitable transition such a fearful endeavour. For many, it is not so much facing the afterlife, as most religions provide some support in that area, but it is in the way we will end our lives that is the major source of concern. How many of us hope and pray to be blessed with an angel, a loved one that will give us the patient support and attend to our very needs during our last days? Such dedicated souls are few and far apart, and rare are the ones that will undertake that exhausting and onerous task. This book is about one of them though, Pierre, a loving husband who, without hesitation, put his life aside to become the sole caretaker of his wife, Louise, diagnosed with a devastating cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Rise. Surviving and thriving after trauma'

Rise. Surviving and thriving after trauma (2016)

Weidenfeld and Nicholson

Renowned as a much-loved and highly respected journalist and broadcaster with thirty years' experience, Sian Williams has studied the impact of acute stress for many years and is also a trained trauma assessor. In RISE, she explores the science of resilience and growth after trauma, offers advice from the experts, and learns from those who have emerged from horrific experiences, feeling changed yet stronger, with a new perspective on their life, their relationships and their work. She also documents her own path through breast cancer, with candid and unflinching honesty. Her story provides a narrative thread through a book designed to help others deal with all manner of adversity, including physical or mental ill health; loss of a loved one; abuse and post-traumatic stress. RISE is a deeply researched exploration of trauma, grief and illness, and most importantly resilience in the darkest of days. It is an inspiring and powerful piece of work, full of honesty, warmth and wisdom. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'It's all just rock and roll...: a terrifically truthful tale of one girl's bust up with breast cancer'

It's all just rock and roll...: a terrifically truthful tale of one girl's bust up with breast cancer (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

A truly inspirational story about love, life, happiness and hair. A true story about a girl's victorious battle with breast cancer. She had a choice to make - to crumble or to fight. Her daughter was four, her job was full on and she was spinning a million plates. She was the queen of dodging reality through all the twists and turns of life. This was different - she had to find a way to face her worst fears and to get herself out of the pickle of all pickles. Little did she know that the very same disease that had claimed her parents when she was far too young was to be her most unlikely saviour. She tells the story in real time with humour, a blunt Yorkshire honesty and breath taking courage. What really happens when you're trying to keep your head (and your hair) when the rest of the world is going mad. And what really happens when you finally find your very own sunshine. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The holistic guide for cancer survivors'

The holistic guide for cancer survivors (2016)

Sheldon Press

While cancer causes more than one in four deaths in the UK, many cancers are increasingly chronic diseases, and holistic management is common. Up to a half of all cancer patients admit to visiting CAM providers; more use complementary therapies. Holistic health isn't a quick fix, but many CAMs are now established, respected and effective parts of the treatment journey in cancer, and indeed many cancer drugs come from plants. This book is a balanced, informative look at how holistic methods may help in the cancer journey. Topics include: Understanding cancer; Why does cancer arise; Common symptoms; How holistic methods may help; Diet; CAM treatments such as acupressure, acupuncture and moxibustion, art therapy, aromatherapy; An anti-cancer lifestyle; Spirituality and healing; How to ensure treatment is safe - never trust anyone who claims to cure cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'What does super Jonny do when mum gets sick? [Spanish]'

What does super Jonny do when mum gets sick? [Spanish] (2016)

Books For Caring Kids

Jonny is a little superhero with a BIG problem. His Mum is sick. How can he help? Join Super Jonny and Bear, as they go to the hospital to investigate. LEARN who the staff working in the hospital are and what they do. DISCOVER Jonny's secret weapon. Super Jonny is recommended by teachers for teachers. The question page links to the English and New Zealand national curriculums. These questions teach the children how to help the sick. Some people need regular hospital care to manage their disease. These people have their own page entitled: Preparing for a hospital admission: 5 tips for chronically ill moms. This ensures that any mother who is going into hospital, has some supplies when her children visit. This list of simple suggestions could also be filled by any adult wanting to help a Mom who is suddenly sick. With its big bold professionally drawn illustrations, Super Jonny is a valuable resource for your family, school or medical centre. (Publisher).

Cover image of 'The street-wise patient’s guide to surviving cancer'

The street-wise patient’s guide to surviving cancer (2016)

Edward Everett Root, Publishers

This book tells you how you can do everything possible to survive cancer. The author is one of the world's leading experts on cancer care. This is an insider's guide to taking control of your own life, and care. YOU can survive cancer - although many patients do not know this. It: offers short, sharp practical guidance; shows patients how to can take control of their care; is essential to patients, and their family; shows you how to get the system to work for you; it gives 100 advisory websites, with expert notes; is absolutely up-to-date. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The butterfly within. A triathlete's race against a brain tumour'

The butterfly within. A triathlete's race against a brain tumour (2016)

Book Guild Publishing

"The butterfly within" follows Special Educational Needs PE teacher and international triathlete Rachel Bown through a year which changes her life forever. It begins on the day she is diagnosed with a brain tumour and finishes when she proudly returns to racing for Team GB. The reader is taken on a roller coaster ride of emotions. We witness hope exploring new depths and determination reaching new heights. She writes about the characters she meets along the way and how they have helped her to become the person she is today. Throughout her story, Rachel recognises the love of those closest to her and understands fully how lucky she is to have their unwavering support. Her focus is always on embracing the life she has been given and defying the so-called insurmountable. Rachel's humorous outlook will have the reader laughing with her wit and honesty; and perhaps shedding a few tears at the low points of her story. Fundamentally, she wants to show that people are good and kind and that if you have faith, there is always hope. A truly inspirational story as Rachel fights her tumour with everything she's got! (Publisher)

Cover image of 'I’m just a person. My year of death, cancer and epiphany'

I’m just a person. My year of death, cancer and epiphany (2016)

Bluebird (Pan Macmillan)

In the span of four months in 2012, Tig Notaro was hospitalized for a debilitating intestinal disease called C. diff, her mother unexpectedly died, she went through a breakup, and then she was diagnosed with bilateral breast cancer. Hit with this devastating barrage, Tig took her grief onstage. Days after receiving her cancer diagnosis, she broke new comedic ground, opening an unvarnished set with the words: 'Good evening. Hello. I have cancer. How are you? Hi, how are you? Is everybody having a good time? I have cancer.' The set instantly went viral, and was ultimately released as Tig's sophomore album, Live, which sold one hundred thousand units in just six weeks and was later nominated for a Grammy. Now, the wildly popular star takes stock of that no good, very bad year - a difficult yet astonishing period in which tragedy turned into absurdity and despair transformed into joy. An inspired combination of the deadpan silliness of her comedy and the open-hearted vulnerability that has emerged in the wake of that dire time, I'm Just a Person is a moving and often hilarious look at this very brave, very funny woman's journey into the darkness and her thrilling return from it. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Living with lymphoma. A patient's guide'

Living with lymphoma. A patient's guide (2016)

Johns Hopkins University Press

When neurobiologist Elizabeth M. Adler was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma almost twenty years ago, she learned everything she could about the disease, both to cope with the emotional stress of her diagnosis and to make the best possible decisions for her treatment. In Living with lymphoma, she combines her scientific expertise and personal knowledge with a desire to help other people who have lymphoma manage this complex and often baffling disease. With the availability of more effective treatment regimens, many people with lymphoma are living longer; in fact, there are more than 700,000 lymphoma survivors in the United States alone. Given this change in the lymphoma landscape, the second edition of this book places a greater emphasis on survivorship. The new edition includes the latest information on lymphoma diagnosis, treatment, and incidence and describes the most recent update to the WHO system of lymphoma classification and staging. Adler discusses new targeted therapies like ibrutinib and idelalisib and describes how other treatments, including radiation therapy and stem cell transplants, have been modified while others have been discontinued. She also addresses new developments, such as the possible role of lack of sunlight and vitamin D in the pathogenesis of lymphoma, and the use of medical marijuana. The book includes suggestions for further reading, including the latest material available online. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Jamie’s journey. Cancer from the voice of a sibling'

Jamie’s journey. Cancer from the voice of a sibling (2016)

Little Five Star

When a child is diagnosed with cancer, his or her siblings may struggle with complex emotions such as confusion, guilt, and fear. Part story, part journal, Jamie's Journey: Cancer from the Voice of a Sibling helps siblings of pediatric cancer patients cope with those intense feelings. The first half of the book is about 13-year-old Jamie who describes the roller coaster of emotions she experiences when her 10-year-old sister, Jordan, is diagnosed with cancer. Jamie laments the loss of her 'normal' teenage life and describes feeling forgotten as her family focuses on Jordan's medical needs. Jamie finds solace through journaling about her experience, and encourages the reader to write about his or her own journey on the pages provided in the book. Jamie's Journey is unique in that it's designed especially for the siblings of pediatric cancer patients. Author Sharon Wozny draws from her experience volunteering with Children's Cancer Network for the past three years. During the time she's spent with young cancer patients and their families, Wozny has discovered that the patients' siblings face unique challenges. "They endure so much," she said. "They feel so much pain on so many levels and need to know that they are heroes also." Wozny has made the second half of the book an interactive journal, offering siblings of pediatric cancer patients a safe place to share their own journey. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The living well with cancer cookbook. An essential guide to nutrition, lifestyle and health'

The living well with cancer cookbook. An essential guide to nutrition, lifestyle and health (2016)

Bantam Press (imprint of Transworld Publications)

When authors Fran Warde and Catherine Zabilowicz met at the Maggie’s centre at Charing Cross Hospital in London, they quickly discovered they shared a passion for good food and healthy eating. They also realized that with their combined knowledge and experience – Fran as an acclaimed food writer, and Catherine as an experienced nutritional therapist working at Maggie’s – they could provide invaluable guidance for anyone living with cancer, their families and friends. The Living Well With Cancer Cookbook, published in support of the Maggie’s charity, is the result of Fran and Catherine’s collaboration. Aimed at helping readers through each stage of their journey – diagnosis, during and after treatment – this essential guide is packed with advice on nutrition and health and offers a range of delicious recipes. There are healthy twists on classic favourites and tempting new treats to try, with every ingredient considered for its health benefits. Positive and empowering, the book contains a wealth of information on the best food choices to make, and reveals why many scientists today believe that certain foods and a balanced diet are crucial in sustaining strength throughout treatment. Taking a holistic approach, this book also seeks to alleviate anxieties, such as those concerning weight-loss, loss of appetite and the changes in how food tastes. Above all, the simple, comforting recipes will help both experienced cooks and novices to create nutritious, easily adapted meals – from breakfast right through to dinner – each one designed to nourish and sustain. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'In gratitude'

In gratitude (2016)

Bloomsbury Publishing

The future flashed before my eyes in all its pre-ordained banality. Embarrassment, at first, to the exclusion of all other feelings. But embarrassment curled at the edges with a weariness. I got a joke in. 'So - we'd better get cooking the meth,' I said to the Poet. In August 2014, Jenny Diski was diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer and given 'two or three years' to live. She didn't know how to react. All responses felt scripted, laden with cliché. Being a writer, she decided to write about it (grappling with the unoriginality even of this), and also to tell a story she has not yet told: that of being taken in, aged fifteen, by the author Doris Lessing, and the subsequent fifty years of their complex relationship. In September 2014 Jenny Diski began writing in the London Review of Books, describing her experience of living with terminal cancer, examining her life and history with Doris Lessing: the fairy-tale rescue from 'the bin' as a teenager, the difficulties of being absorbed into an unfamiliar family and the influence this had on her. Swooping from one memory to the next - alighting on the hysterical battlefield of her parental home, her expulsion from school, stacking shelves in Banbury and the drug-taking twenty-something in and out of psychiatric hospitals, Diski paints a portrait of two extraordinary writers - Lessing and herself. From one of our most original voices comes a book like no other: a cerebral, witty, dazzlingly candid masterpiece about an uneasy relationship; about memory and writing, ingratitude and anger; about living with illness and facing death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'When breath becomes air'

When breath becomes air (2016)

The Bodley Head

At the age of thirty-six, on the verge of completing a decade’s worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, and the next he was a patient struggling to live. And just like that, the future he and his wife had imagined evaporated. When Breath Becomes Air chronicles Kalanithi’s transformation from a naïve medical student “possessed,” as he wrote, “by the question of what, given that all organisms die, makes a virtuous and meaningful life” into a neurosurgeon at Stanford working in the brain, the most critical place for human identity, and finally into a patient and new father confronting his own mortality. What makes life worth living in the face of death? What do you do when the future, no longer a ladder toward your goals in life, flattens out into a perpetual present? What does it mean to have a child, to nurture a new life as another fades away? These are some of the questions Kalanithi wrestles with in this profoundly moving, exquisitely observed memoir. Paul Kalanithi died in March 2015, while working on this book, yet his words live on as a guide and a gift to us all. “I began to realize that coming face to face with my own mortality, in a sense, had changed nothing and everything,” he wrote. “Seven words from Samuel Beckett began to repeat in my head: ‘I can’t go on. I’ll go on.’” When Breath Becomes Air is an unforgettable, life-affirming reflection on the challenge of facing death and on the relationship between doctor and patient, from a brilliant writer who became both. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Marrow. A love story'

Marrow. A love story (2016)

Harper Wave (HarperCollins imprint)

The author of the New York Times bestseller Broken Open returns with a visceral and profound memoir of two sisters who, in the face of a bone marrow transplant—one the donor and one the recipient—begin a quest for acceptance, authenticity, and most of all, love. A mesmerizing and courageous memoir: the story of two sisters uncovering the depth of their love through the life-and-death experience of a bone marrow transplant. Throughout her life, Elizabeth Lesser has sought understanding about what it means to be true to oneself and, at the same time, truly connected to the ones we love. But when her sister Maggie needs a bone marrow transplant to save her life, and Lesser learns that she is the perfect match, she faces a far more immediate and complex question about what it really means to love—honestly, generously, and authentically. Hoping to give Maggie the best chance possible for a successful transplant, the sisters dig deep into the marrow of their relationship to clear a path to unconditional acceptance. They leave the bone marrow transplant up to the doctors, but take on what Lesser calls a "soul marrow transplant," examining their family history, having difficult conversations, examining old assumptions, and offering forgiveness until all that is left is love for each other’s true selves. Their process—before, during, and after the transplant—encourages them to take risks of authenticity in other aspects their lives. But life does not follow the storylines we plan for it. Maggie’s body is ultimately too weak to fight the relentless illness. As she and Lesser prepare for the inevitable, they grow ever closer as their shared blood cells become a symbol of the enduring bond they share. Told with suspense and humor, Marrow is joyous and heartbreaking, incandescent and profound. The story reveals how even our most difficult experiences can offer unexpected spiritual growth. Reflecting on the multifaceted nature of love—love of other, love of self, love of the world—Marrow is an unflinching and beautiful memoir about getting to the very center of ourselves. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'An ABC of prostate cancer today. My journey over 4 continents to find the best cure'

An ABC of prostate cancer today. My journey over 4 continents to find the best cure (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

“An ABC of prostate cancer today – 2nd Edition replaces its best-selling predecessor, “An ABC of prostate cancer in 2015”. The new edition provides the reader with comprehensive information on the very latest diagnosis tests that are available and now becoming routinely used in leading clinics, hospitals and specialist practice around the world. A leading urological surgeon who reviewed the book said: “All my registrars (interns) should get a copy of this book and fully digest its contents.” Another specialist said: “Every general practitioner (physician) in the country should read the book to bring them up-to- date on prostate cancer.” Not with standing these comments, the easy-to-read book, is targeted at the layman, and is written in easily understood language. The book provides the reader with more than 100 questions that prostate cancer sufferers should consider asking their doctors. It also details “My Journey over Four Continents to find the Best Cure”. The book (99,500 words over 344 pages) is presented in three parts: In Part 1, the book looks at what prostate cancer is and examines, in detail, PSA testing and its derivatives such as PSA density, PSA doubling time, free PSA, etc. It also looks in depth at the biopsy process and explains the increasing use of multiparametric MRI as a diagnostic tool. The staging and grading of prostate cancers are explained. Part 2 focusses on the 10 top treatments available to treat prostate cancer. Some of these treatments are broken down into multiple sub-sets. One such treatment is radiation, which is broken down into nine different forms of radiation, each of which is fully presented. Some of these, like proton beam therapy, might offer better alternative outcomes to some sufferers than more ‘popular’ treatments. Whilst the book focusses mainly on the treatment of patients with low and intermediate risk prostate cancer that is localised, the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer is also considered. The book considers diet and nutrition issues in detail and also has chapters on alternative treatments and a comprehensive cancer-fighting plan. This part of the book concludes with a chapter on the all-important prostate cancer support groups. Part 3 of the book details my consideration of various treatment options, my visits to three urologists and a radiation oncologist, my treatment selection process and my subsequent proton beam therapy treatment at the National Cancer Centre in Sout

Cover image of 'Mummy's lump'

Mummy's lump (April 2015)

Breast Cancer Care

This book is aimed at children under six and follows Elly and Jack as they learn of their mother's diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer. Also available as a read-aloud iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch download, read by Zoe Wanamaker (free iOS version or download from iTunes).

Sorry, no publications found.
Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 7 days a week, 8am-8pm