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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 51

Cover image of 'F*** you cancer. How to face the big C, live your life and still be yourself'

F*** you cancer. How to face the big C, live your life and still be yourself (2018)

Vermilion (Random House)

You are stronger than you know, more positive than you ever thought and you can still LIVE with cancer. Drink more green juices, eat turmeric, walk for three hours a day... Arghh, I wanted to scream, run away and tell every well-meaning person to go and do one! Whilst this book doesn’t advocate throwing all advice down the kitchen sink, it will empower you to do things your way as you navigate the big C roller coaster. Deborah James, campaigner and co-presenter of the top-charting podcast You, Me and the Big C, will take you through every twist and turn, reminding you that it’s okay to feel one hundred different things in the space of a minute and showing you how you can still live your life and BE YOURSELF with cancer. Taking you from diagnosis (welcome to the club you never wanted to join), to coping with family and friends (can everyone just fuck off sometimes?!), looking good and feeling better (drink the wine), and celebrating milestones along the way (drink more wine!), this inspiring cancer coach in a book will transform your outlook and encourage you to shout #FUCKYOUCANCER as loudly as you can! (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Not that kind of love. A sister, a brother, some tumours and a cat'

Not that kind of love. A sister, a brother, some tumours and a cat (2018)

Quercus

A moving, thought-provoking and surprisingly humorous book which is both a description of a journey to death and a celebration of the act of living. Based on Clare Wise's blog, which she started when she was first diagnosed with cancer in 2013, Not That Kind of Love charts the highs and lows of the last three years of Clare's life. The end result is not a book that fills you with despair and anguish. On the contrary, Not That Kind of Love should be read by everybody for its candour, and for its warmth and spirit. Clare is an astonishingly dynamic, witty and fun personality, and her positivity and energy exude from every page. As she becomes too weak to type, her brother - the actor Greg Wise - takes over, and the book morphs into a beautiful meditation on life, and the necessity of talking about death. With echoes of Atul Gawande's Being Mortal and Cathy Rentzenbrink's The Last Act of Love, it is a very special read that rejoices in the extraordinary and often underestimated sibling bond, and the importance of making the most of the ordinary pleasures life has to offer. As Greg Wise writes in the book: 'Celebrate the small things, the small moments. If you find yourself with matching socks as you leave the house in the morning, that is a cause for celebration. If the rest of the day is spent finding the cure for cancer, or brokering world peace, then that's a bonus.' (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'A funny thing happened on the way to chemo. A rather unusual memoir'

A funny thing happened on the way to chemo. A rather unusual memoir (2018)

Short Books

"Cancer is not a laughing matter, as I was told by a cross German lady from Dortmund when I showed her this journal. She had herself had breast cancer and is right of course; there are lots of things that are not fun about cancer, most of them unavoidable. I was therefore as surprised as the next person to realise that a huge amount of funny things happen on the way to chemo, or indeed on the way to most places, and that once you get your eye in, you completely forget to be scared..." This is not just an educational book about cancer, although it is certainly safe to give to cancer patients as a cheerful present. More importantly, it sheds new light on why Kim Kardashian is worth Keeping Up With, what playlists to make for MRI scans, the truth behind the legend of Medea, bikini etiquette on a deserted beach, what to do with a glut of rainbow chard, what an Oscar-winner should say in an acceptance speech, how to deal with cold-callers selling life insurance, and what to wear on a March Against Menopause (layers, obviously)... (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Anti cancer living. The six-step solution to transform your health'

Anti cancer living. The six-step solution to transform your health (2018)

Vermilion (Random House)

“You have cancer.” These are perhaps the most feared three words that will ever come out of a doctor’s mouth, and more and more people are hearing them. Yet most patients (and some doctors) do not realize that lifestyle changes can dramatically reduce risk, assist treatment and improve chances of surviving and even thriving after a diagnosis. Over the course of a major study Servan-Schreiber designed with Dr Lorenzo Cohen at the MD Anderson Cancer Center, six key areas have emerged: love and social support, stress management, rest, movement, nutrition and avoiding environmental toxins. Each plays a role--but it's the synergies created by this potent "Mix of Six" that can bring about real shifts in health and well-being, significantly improving quality of life and positively supporting conventional cancer treatments. Dr. David Servan-Schreiber's Anticancer introduced a revolutionary way to understand and confront cancer, changing the lives of millions around the world. He laid out the principles of integrative care that had allowed him to live many years beyond expectations for his own cancer, but readers have long requested a specific plan to implement his approach. Anti cancer Living is that book. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Breast cancer'

Breast cancer (2018)

Oxford University Press

Breast Cancer: The Facts provides essential, easy to follow information on all aspects of the diagnosis and management of breast cancer. It provides essential background information on the disease, from the ways breast problems are investigated, through treatment options and new therapies, to follow-up processes after remission. Fully updated to cover new and emerging therapies in breast cancer, this second edition also features new chapters on treating special or unusual types of breast cancer; surviving and thriving post-treatment; and coping and support strategies for the partners, families, friends, and colleagues of the person diagnosed with breast cancer. Each chapter is enriched with resources such as websites, links to videos, and care plans so the reader can explore relevant topics in greater detail. Written by specialists in breast cancer, the focus is on the whole patient, their family, and social networks, to make this book a holistic guide to better health at and after diagnosis with the disease, equipping patients affected by breast cancer and their families to be able to ask their health care team the questions they need to have answered to make informed decisions about their treatment. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'P.S. I have cancer. Wrestling melanoma and falling in love'

P.S. I have cancer. Wrestling melanoma and falling in love (2018)

Poetry Space Ltd

Mark Sims, a young doctor was diagnosed with advanced skin cancer just before his 27th birthday. This is the story of his 23-month wrestle with the disease, his passion to raise awareness and funds for vital research and how he found love quite unexpectedly, while working through his bucket list. Sadly, Mark died on January 19th 2017. His book is being published posthumously. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'On smaller dogs and larger life questions'

On smaller dogs and larger life questions (2018)

Virago Press (Little, Brown Book Group)

Coming up to her sixtieth birthday, Kate Figes found herself turning to the larger questions of family, love and life's meaning. It is like this author to examine different stages in writing, and her books - from new motherhood and adolescence to coupledom and infidelity - testify to this way of understanding herself and others: so naturally she turned to writing to explore the challenges of becoming sixty. And then - a horrible, and sudden diagnosis of breast cancer which had metastasised. Instead of a gentle journey into middle age, Kate Figes began to write for her life. Now, clawing back confidence and control was not just the ordinary business of these years: it was the only way to try and survive great pain and emotional turmoil. As her writing became an honest reflection on ageing, failing, regrets and the importance of childhood memory, friends, family and love she found a new determination to live to the full and about finding ways to face up to a shortened life expectancy with dignity. Original, passionate, funny and moving, On Smaller Dogs and Larger Life Questions will resonate with anyone dealing with the many griefs and freedoms of midlife. It is about living with a life-threatening disease but it is even more: an intelligent and passionate look at the way we can approach disappointment and trouble, friendship and love - every day. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Dear cancer. A diary of hope to help you through'

Dear cancer. A diary of hope to help you through (2018)

Trapeze (Orion)

Renowned as a much-loved and highly respected BBC journalist, Victoria Derbyshire has spent 20 years finding the human story behind the headlines. In 2015 she found herself at the heart of the news, with a devastating breast cancer diagnosis. With honesty and openness, she decided to live out her treatment and recovery in the spotlight in a series of video diaries that encouraged thousands to seek diagnosis and help. Victoria has kept a diary since she was nine years old and in this book she shares her day to day experiences of life following her diagnosis and coming to terms with a future that wasn't planned. From the moment she woke up to find her right breast had collapsed, to telling her partner and children, through to mastectomy and chemotherapy. From wearing a wig to work and hiding it from her colleagues, to the relief and joy of finishing treatment before immediately flying to Glasgow to present a debate on the European Referendum. y sharing her story, she became the person that mums, daughters, sisters, husbands, boyfriends and family members contacted to thank as they tried to find ways to cope with their own and their loved ones' prognosis, and needed to know that they were not alone. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The complete guide to breast cancer: how to feel empowered and take control'

The complete guide to breast cancer: how to feel empowered and take control (2018)

Vermilion (Random House)

The book you can trust to support you at every stage of your treatment - and beyond. Professor Trisha Greenhalgh, an academic GP, and Dr Liz O’Riordan, a Consultant Breast Cancer Surgeon, are not only outstanding doctors, but they have also experienced breast cancer first-hand. The Complete Guide to Breast Cancer brings together all the knowledge they have gathered as patients and as doctors to give you and your family a trusted, thorough and up-to-date source of information. Designed to empower you during your breast cancer treatment, it covers: simple explanations of every breast cancer treatment; coping with the emotional burden of breast cancer; frank advice about sex and relationships; staying healthy during and after treatment; dealing with the fear of recurrence; living with secondary breast cancer. Packed full of all the things the authors wished they’d known when they were diagnosed, and tips on how to cope with surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and beyond, this is the only book you need to read to guide you through your breast cancer diagnosis. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Love, light and mermaid tails. One woman's healing journey back to wholeness through stage four cancer'

Love, light and mermaid tails. One woman's healing journey back to wholeness through stage four cancer (2017)

Fi Munro

In January 2016, at the age of 30, Fi Munro was diagnosed with non-genetic stage four ovarian cancer. In that moment, after months of pain, tests and assurances that it was ‘nothing to worry about’, her instincts were proved right and her worst fears were realised. In the months that followed, understanding her diagnosis, recovery and health became her full-time job. Using her expertise as a researcher she dedicated her time to understanding everything she could about her diagnosis and subsequent prognosis. In this honest, open and often tear-jerking account of her journey back to wholeness, Fi openly shares her story from diagnosis with stage four ‘terminal’ cancer to living an incredible, healthy life full of joy and laughter. This book is a guide for anyone, not just those with cancer, who wants to embrace a happier, healthier and more caring approach to their life. May it bring you hope, peace and, above all, joy. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Connecting with cancer. Living with and beyond cancer'

Connecting with cancer. Living with and beyond cancer (2017)

Melrose Books

Surgeon: You’ve got cancer, but we can keep you going for a few months, or maybe a few years. Me: Okay, which is it, months or years? Surgeon: Silence. Me: Will it kill me? Surgeon: Yes, it probably will. That was when my head went into overdrive and I lost the plot. Hearing that you have cancer is a life-changing moment. Connecting with Cancer tells the stories of different people affected by different cancers: how their lives were changed, how they found an inner strength, how they found hope and a life after cancer. Each story is personal and sometimes very intimate; in the pages of this book, you will learn what cancer feels like. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cancer was my companion. A memoir'

Cancer was my companion. A memoir (2017)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

This is the story of a man coming to terms with his own mortality. Originally diagnosed with colon cancer, he fought to survive the treatment, only to find that the disease had spread to his liver. Further surgery saved his life again. It was an experience that helped him realise what he thought he already knew, but really didn’t: that he could die. David I Brown writes with both sensitivity and raging anger. It is an unusual mixture of styles with plenty of black humour peppered in between. Drawing on his keen observations, Brown explains the medical processes he underwent from diagnosis through treatment to recovery and provides us with a harsh but beautifully fierce – almost surreal – understanding of his emotional journey. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Thinking out loud. Love, grief and being mum and dad'

Thinking out loud. Love, grief and being mum and dad (2017)

Hodder & Stoughton

In 2015, former England football star Rio Ferdinand suddenly and tragically lost his wife and soulmate Rebecca, aged 34, to cancer. It was a profound shock and Rio found himself struggling to cope not just with the pain of his grief, but also with his new role as both mum and dad to their three young children. Rio's BBC1 documentary, Being Mum and Dad, touched everyone who watched it and won huge praise for the honesty and bravery he showed in talking about his emotions and experiences. His book now shares the story of meeting, marrying and losing Rebecca, his own and the family's grief - as well as the advice and support that get him through each day as they strive to piece themselves back together. Thinking Out Loud is written in the hope that he can inspire others struggling with loss and grief to find the help they need through this most difficult of times. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Run for your life. How one woman ran circles around breast cancer'

Run for your life. How one woman ran circles around breast cancer (2017)

Pitch Publishing Ltd

Running has been many things to Jenny Baker – a space to achieve new things, a way to keep fit and healthy, and a source of friendship and community. She had planned a year of running to celebrate her birthday; instead Jenny was hit with a bombshell which rocked her life when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. She had one question for her oncologist: can I keep running? It gave her a sense of identity through her chemotherapy, while her treatment was stripping away everything that was important to her. Run for Your Life is the story of how she kept running to help her beat cancer, and how it helped her get her life back on track after an intensive spell of treatment and a turbulent time in her life. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Laughing at cancer. How to heal with love, laughter and mindfulness'

Laughing at cancer. How to heal with love, laughter and mindfulness (2017)

Brolga Publishing Pty

Laughing at cancer is a unique book based on a series of journals following the author's shock diagnosis of bowel cancer at 43. Brimming with humour, insight and sensitivity, it explores how we talk about and view illness, and how changing your mindset can do wonders on the journey to health. Through explanations of mindful healing techniques and the power of laughter, Laughing at cancer is both a touching memoir and powerful healing guide for anyone undergoing a significant health or life challenge, and not specifically cancer. Wellbeing and mindfulness healing techniques at the conclusion of each chapter empower readers and provide strategies to enhance resilience - a factor often diminished by ill health. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Well. A doctor's journey through fear to freedom'

Well. A doctor's journey through fear to freedom (2017)

Saraband

When Dr Mary Gunn was diagnosed with cancer, her first reaction was fear, and to fight the disease aggressively for the sake of not only herself but her young children and husband. But when it came back – and turned out to be incurable – she knew that she couldn’t live the rest of her life in fear. Mary embraced a new approach to life: to accept all the joy and sorrow, safety and danger, certainty and unpredictability… in essence, to live freely. In our uncertain times, when it’s difficult not to feel the fear, Dr Mary Gunn’s remarkable memoir offers mindfulness tools for resilience, and shows how we can all use acceptance, compassion and love to live courageously, magnificently. Backed up by many years of experience as both a doctor and a patient, her story will inspire you to let go of fear, love life and live well. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Grief works. Stories of life, death and surviving'

Grief works. Stories of life, death and surviving (2017)

Penguin Life

Death affects us all. Yet it is still the last taboo in our society, and grief is still profoundly misunderstood... In Grief Works we hear stories from those who have experienced great love and great loss - and survived. Stories that explain how grief unmasks our greatest fears, strips away our layers of protection and reveals our innermost selves. Julia Samuel, a grief psychotherapist, has spent twenty-five years working with the bereaved and understanding the full repercussions of loss. This deeply affecting book is full of psychological insights on how grief, if approached correctly, can heal us. Through elegant, moving stories, we learn how we can stop feeling awkward and uncertain about death, and not shy away from talking honestly with family and friends. This extraordinary book shows us how to live and learn from great loss. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Dear cancer, love Victoria: a mum’s diary of hope'

Dear cancer, love Victoria: a mum’s diary of hope (2017)

Trapeze (Orion)

Renowned as a much-loved and highly respected BBC journalist, Victoria Derbyshire has spent 20 years finding the human story behind the headlines. In 2015 she found herself at the heart of the news, with a devastating breast cancer diagnosis. With honesty and openness, she decided to live out her treatment and recovery in the spotlight in a series of video diaries that encouraged thousands to seek diagnosis and help. Victoria has kept a diary since she was nine years old and in DEAR CANCER, LOVE VICTORIA she shares her day to day experiences of life following her diagnosis and coming to terms with a future that wasn't planned. From the moment she woke up to find her right breast had collapsed, to telling her partner and children, through to mastectomy and chemotherapy. From wearing a wig to work and hiding it from her colleagues, to the relief and joy of finishing treatment before immediately flying to Glasgow to present a debate on the European Referendum. By sharing her story, she became the person that mums, daughters, sisters, husbands, boyfriends and family members contacted to thank as they tried to find ways to cope with their own and their loved ones' prognosis, and needed to know that they were not alone. Victoria's story is an affecting and at times heart-breaking one but it is so often laugh-out-loud too. Moving, wonderfully heartwarming and ultimately uplifting, this is a powerful account of a brave struggle told with honesty, courage and emotion that gives strength to anyone touched by cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Pretty sick. The beauty guide for woman with cancer. How to look your best when you feel your worst'

Pretty sick. The beauty guide for woman with cancer. How to look your best when you feel your worst (2017)

Piatkus (Little, Brown Book Group)

The ultimate resource to looking your best during and after cancer treatment, from a veteran beauty industry insider. Like many women who receive the shattering diagnosis of cancer, Caitlin Kiernan was concerned about her health and her future, but also about how the treatment would affect how she felt and looked - would she lose her hair? Would she lose her nails? How would she look after a double mastectomy? But unlike other women who battle cancer, Kiernan has spent her entire career as a beauty editor, beauty director (most recently for Life & Style Weekly), and now beauty producer. As someone who works in the public eye and in the fashion industry, Kiernan had to quickly learn how to look her best even when she was feeling her worst. So she called on her list of extensive contacts and beauty insiders - from hair professionals to top medical doctors (at institutions like Memorial Sloan Kettering and Mt Sinai Hospital) to style mavens and even celebrities (including Wendy Williams and Hoda Kotb) - to gather the best and most useful beauty tips for cancer treatment. The result is Pretty Sick: the ultimate guide to beauty during (and after) cancer treatment, covering skin care, hair care (and wig shopping), nail care, makeup, an explanation of breast cancer surgical options, style advice for life post mastectomy, and much, much more. Illustrated with charming line drawings and peppered with advice from celebrities and cancer survivors, Pretty Sick will be a welcome and trusted resource during treatment, helping women to look their best even when they don't feel their best. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer-fighting kitchen. Nourishing, big-flavor recipes for cancer treatment and recovery'

The cancer-fighting kitchen. Nourishing, big-flavor recipes for cancer treatment and recovery (2017)

Ten Speed Press

This new and revised edition of the IACP award-winning cookbook brings the healing power of delicious, nutritious foods to those whose hearts and bodies crave a revitalizing meal, through 150 new and updated recipes. Featuring science-based, nutrient-rich recipes that are easy to prepare and designed to give patients a much-needed boost by stimulating appetite and addressing treatment side effects including fatigue, nausea, dehydration, mouth and throat soreness, taste bud changes, and weight loss. A step-by-step guide helps patients nutritionally prepare for all phases of treatment, and a full nutritional analysis accompanies each recipe. This remarkable resource teaches patients and caregivers how to use readily available powerhouse ingredients to build a symptom- and cancer-fighting culinary toolkit. Blending fantastic taste and meticulous science, these recipes for soups, vegetable dishes, proteins, and sweet and savory snacks are rich in the nutrients, minerals, and phytochemicals that help patients thrive during treatment. This second edition also includes a dozen new recipes--many of which are simpler and less complicated, for cancer patients to prepare on their low days--as well as a list of cancer-fighting foods that can be incorporated into everyday life without stepping behind the stove. Rebecca has also revised the text with the most up-to-date scientific research and includes a section on how friends and family can build a culinary support team. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'The essential guide to breast cancer'

The essential guide to breast cancer (2017)

Need2Know

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in the UK; there are approximately 45,000 new cases every year. A new diagnosis can be very frightening and many people will have no prior knowledge of the disease. This book is for women and their families who are looking for a comprehensive but plain language guide to breast cancer and its treatments. Many people find that doctors, although highly qualified and well meaning, can forget how little the layperson knows about medical procedures and terminology. Starting with the basics, this guide will look at what breast cancer is and how it’s diagnosed, right through to support options, the treatment available and how to care for your carers. The emotional after-effects of being a survivor are also covered in detail. Written by a survivor of breast cancer and peer reviewed by a breast cancer specialist, this book will provide everything women need to know about breast care, being diagnosed with breast cancer and the road to recovery. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Living with cancer. A step-by-step guide for coping medically and emotionally with a serious diagnosis'

Living with cancer. A step-by-step guide for coping medically and emotionally with a serious diagnosis (2017)

Johns Hopkins University Press

The prospect of entering treatment is overwhelming for anyone facing a diagnosis of cancer. While patients have access to a vast amount of medical information online, this advice is often unreliable or confusing. In Living with Cancer, Drs. Vicki A. Jackson and David P. Ryan have crafted the first step-by-step guide aimed at helping people with this life-defining disease grasp what’s happening to them while coping physically and emotionally with cancer treatment. An empathetic resource full of relatable patient stories, this book teaches patients and caregivers how to ask the right questions to get the best possible care―beginning at the moment of diagnosis. Drs. Jackson and Ryan explain how to work with a team of doctors and nurse practitioners to minimize symptoms and side effects while living as fully as possible in the face of cancer. They relay important information about understanding prognosis, and they translate what doctors mean when they describe tests, treatments, and medical procedures. Finally, they discuss hospice care and answer questions about continuing treatment and managing the final phase of life. Based on new research and a groundbreaking program in which patients are treated with palliative care―along with the best cancer care―during the course of their illness, this honest and caring book provides the right advice to use at the right time throughout a journey with cancer. It allows a person with cancer to concentrate on living the best life possible, despite an uncertain future. Patients at every stage will find Living with Cancer a comprehensive, thoughtful, and accessible guide for navigating the illness and its treatment. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'There is no good card for this: what to say and do when life is scary, awful, and unfair to people you love'

There is no good card for this: what to say and do when life is scary, awful, and unfair to people you love (2017)

HarperOne

The creator of the viral hit "Empathy Cards" teams up with a compassion expert to produce a visually stunning and groundbreaking illustrated guide to help you increase your emotional intelligence and learn how to offer comfort and support when someone you know is in pain. When someone you know is hurting, you want to let her know that you care. But many people don’t know what words to use—or are afraid of saying or doing the wrong thing. This thoughtful, instructive guide, from empathy expert Dr. Kelsey Crowe and greeting card maverick Emily McDowell, blends well-researched, actionable advice with the no-nonsense humor and the signature illustration style of McDowell's immensely popular Empathy Cards, to help you feel confident in connecting with anyone experiencing grief, loss, illness, or any other difficult situation. Written in a how-to, relatable, we’ve-all-been-that-deer-in-the-headlights kind of way, There Is No Good Card for This isn’t a spiritual treatise on how to make you a better person or a scientific argument about why compassion matters. It is a helpful illustrated guide to effective compassion that takes you, step by step by step, past the paralysis of thinking about someone in a difficult time to actually doing something (or nothing) with good judgment instead of fear. There Is No Good Card for This features workbook exercises, sample dialogs, and real-life examples from Dr. Crowe’s research, including her popular "Empathy Bootcamps" that give people tools for building relationships when it really counts. Whether it’s a coworker whose mother has died, a neighbor whose husband has been in a car accident, or a friend who is seriously ill, There Is No Good Card for This teaches you how to be the best friend you can be to someone in need. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'With the end in mind. Dying, death and wisdom in an age of denial'

With the end in mind. Dying, death and wisdom in an age of denial (2017)

William Collins

In this unprecedented book, palliative medicine pioneer Dr Kathryn Mannix explores the biggest taboo in our society and the only certainty we all share: death. Told through a series of beautifully crafted stories taken from nearly four decades of clinical practice, her book answers the most intimate questions about the process of dying with touching honesty and humanity. She makes a compelling case for the therapeutic power of approaching death not with trepidation but with openness, clarity and understanding. With the End in Mind is a book for us all: the grieving and bereaved, ill and healthy. Open these pages and you will find stories about people who are like you, and like people you know and love. You will meet Holly, who danced her last day away; Eric, the retired head teacher who, even with Motor Neurone Disease, gets things done; loving, tender-hearted Nelly and Joe, each living a lonely lie to save their beloved from distress; and Sylvie, 19, dying of leukaemia, sewing a cushion for her mum to hug by the fire after she has died. These are just four of the book’s thirty-odd stories of normal humans, dying normal human deaths. They show how the dying embrace living not because they are unusual or brave, but because that’s what humans do. By turns touching, tragic, at times funny and always wise, they offer us illumination, models for action, and hope. Read this book and you’ll be better prepared for life as well as death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Tommy v cancer.  One man's battle against the big C'

Tommy v cancer. One man's battle against the big C (2017)

Independently published

On Thursday, 10th of March 2016, I returned home from a hospital appointment and broke the news to my wife and children. I had throat cancer. Stage four. Inoperable. Desperately needing some way to make sense of my situation, I set up a blog to chart my battle against the disease. I hoped it would allow me to understand more about this thing inside me, and what I would have to go through in terms of treatment to try to eradicate it. I also thought it might help other people who found themselves in similar circumstances. I made a promise to my readers to be open and honest all the way. I wouldn't hold anything back, no matter how unpleasant. Now, over a year later, I have adapted that blog into this book. It details my journey from when I first realised that something was wrong, through the intense courses of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, to where I am today. To say that journey was difficult is a vast understatement. The side effects of my treatment utterly kicked my arse, causing me to lose over half my bodyweight and fall seriously ill with double pneumonia and sepsis. Totally unresponsive, I was rushed into intensive care where the doctors told my family that, if they couldn't stabilise me, I had approximately two hours left to live. One option was to put me into a medically induced coma, although the chances were high that I would never emerge from it. Imagine someone telling you that about your loved one as they lie there, unconscious and struggling to breathe. Cancer is an invader that affects more than just the patient. Everyone suffers - spouses, siblings, children, extended family, friends. Even, as I was to discover, strangers from all over the world. I was overwhelmed with the love and kindness of almost everyone who contacted me, but I also suffered terrible abuse at the hands of online trolls. I should warn you that parts of this book do not make for easy reading. I kept my promise to be honest, and wrote many of the blog entries when I was depressed and scared, certain I wouldn't live to see another dawn. I convinced myself that I would quickly perish, leaving my wife and two sons - then aged 9 and 17 - alone, and with no-one to protect them or provide for them. I wouldn't get to see them grow up, develop into young men, and eventually have children of their own. The prospect terrified me. For those of you who followed my blog and read the posts as I uploaded them, you haven't seen everything. This book c

Cover image of 'The fabulous woman’s guide through cancer'

The fabulous woman’s guide through cancer (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

"The fabulous woman’s guide through cancer" is for every woman touched by cancer but still determined to feel in control of their life. Giving real advice from a number of fabulous women affected by cancer, it includes tips, examples, stories, memoirs, information and ideas covering everything from post-operation styling, ideas to stay social when you can't go out, dealing with doctors, ways to stay lifted and lots more, all with plenty of kind words and inspiration to keep women on-track during this time. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A series of catastrophes and miracles. A true story of love, science and cancer'

A series of catastrophes and miracles. A true story of love, science and cancer (2016)

National Geographic

After being diagnosed in her early 40s with metastatic melanoma, journalist and mother of two Mary Elizabeth Williams finds herself in a race against the clock. She takes a once-in-a-lifetime chance and joins a clinical trial for immunotherapy, a revolutionary drug regimen that trains the body to vanquish malignant cells. Astonishingly, her cancer disappears entirely in just a few weeks. But at the same time, her best friend embarks on a cancer journey of her own - with very different results. Williams's experiences as a patient and a medical test subject reveal with stark honesty what it takes to weather disease, the extraordinary new developments that are rewriting the rules of science - and the healing power of human connection. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The living well with cancer cookbook. An essential guide to nutrition, lifestyle and health'

The living well with cancer cookbook. An essential guide to nutrition, lifestyle and health (2016)

Bantam Press (imprint of Transworld Publications)

When authors Fran Warde and Catherine Zabilowicz met at the Maggie’s centre at Charing Cross Hospital in London, they quickly discovered they shared a passion for good food and healthy eating. They also realized that with their combined knowledge and experience – Fran as an acclaimed food writer, and Catherine as an experienced nutritional therapist working at Maggie’s – they could provide invaluable guidance for anyone living with cancer, their families and friends. The Living Well With Cancer Cookbook, published in support of the Maggie’s charity, is the result of Fran and Catherine’s collaboration. Aimed at helping readers through each stage of their journey – diagnosis, during and after treatment – this essential guide is packed with advice on nutrition and health and offers a range of delicious recipes. There are healthy twists on classic favourites and tempting new treats to try, with every ingredient considered for its health benefits. Positive and empowering, the book contains a wealth of information on the best food choices to make, and reveals why many scientists today believe that certain foods and a balanced diet are crucial in sustaining strength throughout treatment. Taking a holistic approach, this book also seeks to alleviate anxieties, such as those concerning weight-loss, loss of appetite and the changes in how food tastes. Above all, the simple, comforting recipes will help both experienced cooks and novices to create nutritious, easily adapted meals – from breakfast right through to dinner – each one designed to nourish and sustain. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Embroidered cancer comic'

Embroidered cancer comic (2016)

Singing Dragon (Jessica Kingsley)

'Come to bed with me?' 'Huh? No, I'd rather read this book about cancer...' As soon as Bob was diagnosed with aggressive prostate cancer, he and his wife Elizabeth started making cancer jokes to take the edge off of an otherwise frightening situation. A lot of those jokes were about sex. Here, textile artist Elizabeth Shefrin has picked up a needle and thread to share those intimate jokes, revealing how they helped her and her husband to process the realities of cancer treatment. Giving lightness and humour to a rarely discussed topic, this unpretentious and wry embroidered comic will create awareness and discourse around a taboo topic, resonating with others in similar situations and reassuring us that it's ok to laugh. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'When breath becomes air'

When breath becomes air (2016)

The Bodley Head

At the age of thirty-six, on the verge of completing a decade’s worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, and the next he was a patient struggling to live. And just like that, the future he and his wife had imagined evaporated. When Breath Becomes Air chronicles Kalanithi’s transformation from a naïve medical student “possessed,” as he wrote, “by the question of what, given that all organisms die, makes a virtuous and meaningful life” into a neurosurgeon at Stanford working in the brain, the most critical place for human identity, and finally into a patient and new father confronting his own mortality. What makes life worth living in the face of death? What do you do when the future, no longer a ladder toward your goals in life, flattens out into a perpetual present? What does it mean to have a child, to nurture a new life as another fades away? These are some of the questions Kalanithi wrestles with in this profoundly moving, exquisitely observed memoir. Paul Kalanithi died in March 2015, while working on this book, yet his words live on as a guide and a gift to us all. “I began to realize that coming face to face with my own mortality, in a sense, had changed nothing and everything,” he wrote. “Seven words from Samuel Beckett began to repeat in my head: ‘I can’t go on. I’ll go on.’” When Breath Becomes Air is an unforgettable, life-affirming reflection on the challenge of facing death and on the relationship between doctor and patient, from a brilliant writer who became both. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Living with lymphoma. A patient's guide'

Living with lymphoma. A patient's guide (2016)

Johns Hopkins University Press

When neurobiologist Elizabeth M. Adler was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma almost twenty years ago, she learned everything she could about the disease, both to cope with the emotional stress of her diagnosis and to make the best possible decisions for her treatment. In Living with lymphoma, she combines her scientific expertise and personal knowledge with a desire to help other people who have lymphoma manage this complex and often baffling disease. With the availability of more effective treatment regimens, many people with lymphoma are living longer; in fact, there are more than 700,000 lymphoma survivors in the United States alone. Given this change in the lymphoma landscape, the second edition of this book places a greater emphasis on survivorship. The new edition includes the latest information on lymphoma diagnosis, treatment, and incidence and describes the most recent update to the WHO system of lymphoma classification and staging. Adler discusses new targeted therapies like ibrutinib and idelalisib and describes how other treatments, including radiation therapy and stem cell transplants, have been modified while others have been discontinued. She also addresses new developments, such as the possible role of lack of sunlight and vitamin D in the pathogenesis of lymphoma, and the use of medical marijuana. The book includes suggestions for further reading, including the latest material available online. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Rise. Surviving and thriving after trauma'

Rise. Surviving and thriving after trauma (2016)

Weidenfeld and Nicholson

Renowned as a much-loved and highly respected journalist and broadcaster with thirty years' experience, Sian Williams has studied the impact of acute stress for many years and is also a trained trauma assessor. In RISE, she explores the science of resilience and growth after trauma, offers advice from the experts, and learns from those who have emerged from horrific experiences, feeling changed yet stronger, with a new perspective on their life, their relationships and their work. She also documents her own path through breast cancer, with candid and unflinching honesty. Her story provides a narrative thread through a book designed to help others deal with all manner of adversity, including physical or mental ill health; loss of a loved one; abuse and post-traumatic stress. RISE is a deeply researched exploration of trauma, grief and illness, and most importantly resilience in the darkest of days. It is an inspiring and powerful piece of work, full of honesty, warmth and wisdom. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Achievement: cancer free for 20 years'

Achievement: cancer free for 20 years (2016)

Achievement Specialists Ltd

Full of tips, tools, techniques, and the secrets Curly Martin used to overcome cancer. How she now lives a passionate, exciting, healthy, wealthy, happy life. Curly Martin was diagnosed with breast cancer, and an aggressive form of lymphatic cancer in 1992 and she was given nine months to live. At that time she became homeless and was unemployed. This book is all about her fascinating and funny 20 year journey from cancer to coaching. Since the terminal diagnosis, she has become an international bestselling author of, The Coaching Handbook Series of books. She is a highly sought-after international speaker, a pioneer of life coach training and the founder of a very successful training company, Achievement Specialists Limited. She intuitively combines her personal experiences with accepted methodologies and cutting edge innovations, to create exciting, very entertaining and effective approaches to living a healthy, happy and successful life. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Going into hospital? A guide for patients, carers and families'

Going into hospital? A guide for patients, carers and families (2015)

Eastdown Publishing

Hospitals are a constant presence in the lives of many people. Almost everyone will visit or go into hospital at some point in their life. This can be a confusing experience: the environment is strange, the daily routine is unfamiliar and it is hard to understand the medical language. Going into hospital is, in many ways, like visiting a foreign country. This book is your guide to the foreign land of the hospital. It provides clear, practical information about how hospitals work, who the staff are and the investigations and treatments you may receive. The book helps you understand hospital-speak by translating it into straightforward English. The book has been written by a consultant surgeon, a pharmacist and a psychologist who have all worked in hospitals for many years. If you are better informed and can understand concepts like choice, risk and benefit, you can work more effectively with your healthcare team to make the right decisions, and you will be better equipped to help yourself and your family. You will find this book an invaluable guide to a journey through the hospital. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The Royal Marsden cancer cookbook'

The Royal Marsden cancer cookbook (2015)

Kyle Books

The book is divided into three: a detailed section by Clare Shaw about diet and cancer and the problems you may face during treatment (like loss of appetite, nausea, sore mouth, change of taste); recipes to cook during treatment, which are nutritionally beneficial and wholesome enough to keep you strong even if you can’t eat too much; and a section of recipes for after treatment aimed at keeping you healthy. These recipes are designed to serve smaller portions and two people as well as for families, and there are lots of tips about budgeting, leftovers and freezing. Clare and Catherine want to emphasise that you don’t have to cook ‘special’, separate meals for one, the rest of the family can eat in the same way, saving on time and stress as well as encouraging a healthier diet for all. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The c-word'

The c-word (2015)

Arrow Books

The last thing Lisa Lynch had expected to put on her 'things to do before you're 30' list was beating breast cancer, but them's the breaks. So with her life on hold, and her mind stuffed with unspoken fears, questions and emotions, she turned to her computer and started blogging about the frustrating, life-altering, sheer pain-in-the-arse inconvenience of getting breast cancer at the age of 28. The C-Word is an unflinchingly honest and darkly humorous account of Lisa's battle with The Bullshit, as she came to call it. From the good days when she could almost pretend it wasn't happening, to the bad days, when she couldn't bear to wake up, Lisa's story is emotional, heartbreaking and often hilarious. The C-Word will make you laugh and cry, and ultimately reaffirm your faith in life. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Late fragments'

Late fragments (2015)

William Collins

Ambitious and talented, Kate Gross worked at Number 10 Downing Street for two British Prime Ministers whilst only in her twenties. At thirty, she was CEO of a charity working with fragile democracies in Africa. She had married 'the best looking man I've ever kissed' – and given birth to twin boys in 2008. The future was bright. But aged 34, Kate was diagnosed with advanced colon cancer. After a two-year battle with the disease, Kate died peacefully at home on Christmas morning, just ten minutes before her sons awoke to open their stockings. She began to write as a gift to herself, a reminder that she could create even as her body began to self-destruct. Written for those she loves,her book is not a conventional cancer memoir; nor is it filled with medical jargon or misery. Instead, it is Kate's powerful attempt to make sense of the woman who emerged in the strange, lucid final chunk of her life. Her book aspires to give hope and purpose to the lives of her readers even as her own life drew to its close. Kate should have been granted decades to say all that she says in these pages. Denied the chance to bore her children and grandchildren with stories when she became fat and old, she offers us all instead her thoughts on how to live; on the wonder to be found in the everyday; the importance of friendship and love; what it means to die before your time and how to fill your life with hope and joy even in the face of tragedy. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'From both ends of the stethoscope. Getting through breast cancer – by a doctor who knows'

From both ends of the stethoscope. Getting through breast cancer – by a doctor who knows (2015)

Faito Books

Whilst dealing with her own breast cancer, Dr Kathleen Thompson recognised the desperate need for a 'going through breast cancer' guide. Her experiences make a fascinating story in themselves, and Kathleen uses them to guide the reader through diagnostic tests and treatment options, what to do when things go wrong, and when mistakes are made. All the while she explains what is happening and why. Recognising that anyone encountering cancer is in a state of shock, she delivers factual information intermingled with her own story, in an easily-digestible, and often amusing format. Each chapter ends with further information sources and a summary. Kathleen looks back on her cancer journey with honesty, humour and compassion, and with the benefit of her medical understanding and knowledge of the system. Later in the book she also explains medical research and how to assess the credibility of the numerous cancer treatment claims, and what we can all do to protect ourselves from cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'My cancer journey. A rendezvous with myself'

My cancer journey. A rendezvous with myself (2015)

Balboa Press

My book is a candid narration of my encounter with breast cancer. It is the story of an ordinary woman who was put in extraordinary circumstances, and who undertook her cancer journey with the utmost courage. This memoir is not just about describing a difficult medical condition. It is about going through the experience, and emerging from it wiser and stronger. It is about using cancer as a life changing experience, despite all the trauma and the loss – and the change needn’t be for the worse. It is about understanding the choice that a human being has – the choice to accept what cannot be changed, and to use one of the toughest fights of life to evolve into a better person, irrespective of the prognosis. Pick up a copy to embark on a rendezvous with your inner self! (Author)

Cover image of 'Cook for your life: delicious, nourishing recipes for before, during, and after cancer treatment'

Cook for your life: delicious, nourishing recipes for before, during, and after cancer treatment (2015)

Avery Publishing Group

A beautiful, unique cookbook with delicious recipes for all stages of cancer treatment and recovery, from a two-time cancer survivor and founder of the Cook for Your Life nutrition-based cooking programs. Two-time cancer survivor Ann Ogden Gaffney discovered during her months of treatment for breast cancer that she was able to find powerful relief for her symptoms through cooking. Realizing that other patients and families could benefit from the skills and techniques she'd learned, she began to offer advice, recipes, and free classes to patients. A former fashion consultant, Gaffney realized after her treatment that her heart was no longer in seasonal colors and hemline trends. Instead, she wanted to help people with cancer and their families cook and care for themselves. In 2007,the non-profit organization Cook for Your Life was born. Its programs have received funding from NIH and have been embraced by organizations such as Columbia University's School of Public Health, Mount Sinai, Atlantic Health, the American Cancer Society, and more, and has touched hundreds of thousands of lives. Now Gaffney delivers her highly anticipated cookbook, based on her classes. So many cancer cookbooks are too complicated to follow, or too clinical and uninspired. This is the first cookbook to organize the recipes into categories according to the way patients feel for example, Simple recipes when the patient is fatigued, Safe recipes when a patient's immune system is compromised, and Spicy recipes when a patient is feeling better and needs to wake up her taste buds. With its warmth, authority, beautiful design, and smartly conceived format, Cook for Your Life empowers patients and families to cook their way back to health. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'Tea & chemo. Fighting cancer, living life'

Tea & chemo. Fighting cancer, living life (2015)

Urbane Publications Limited

At the age of 45, wife and mother Jackie Buxton was diagnosed with breast cancer. Lurching between the crippling fear that the cancer had spread, and the great comfort of knowing she was one of the lucky ones who could be treated, she did what she always does when life presents her with a challenge: she wrote it down. Jackie quickly realised that even with cancer, life was far from bad. Never known for her scientific prowess, she nonetheless became a 'bit of an expert' - at least in the field of hair loss, water retention and biscuits - and decided to use her writing to share experiences and help others recognise you don't have to be defined by your cancer. Tea & Chemo is full of laughter, tears, honesty and hope, and offers inspirational words to everyone facing the life challenges that cancer inevitably brings. All proceeds from the sales of Tea & Chemo will go to three incredibly important charities, whose compassionate care and professionalism make the difference to so many lives: The Haven, Breast Cancer Now and The Robert Ogden Macmillan Centre, Harrogate. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The breast cancer cookbook'

The breast cancer cookbook (2015)

Quadrille Publishing Ltd

A specifically tailored lifestyle cookbook to combat breast cancer, from surgical oncologist Professor Mo Keshtgar. Breast cancer is by far the most common cancer in women, affecting 1 in 8 women in the UK. It is now known that diet and lifestyle are significant risk factors in the development of the disease. Adopting a healthier diet can reduce the risk of getting breast cancer and improve the survival of patients who have been diagnosed. Breast cancer specialist Mo Keshtgar takes you through the risk factors and specific dietary associations with breast cancer, including phytoestrogens, fruit and vegetables, fats and dairy products. Advice on foods to avoid, foods to eat in moderation and foods to eat more of follows, with simple suggestions as to how to achieve these changes. The enticing collection of over 100 recipes covers breakfasts, soups, salads, fish and shellfish, poultry and meat, vegetarian dishes, treats and drinks. All the dishes have been specifically created to take in all the dietary considerations linked to breast cancer and the possible side effects of treatments. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Thirty things about cancer. A guide to getting through'

Thirty things about cancer. A guide to getting through (2015)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

1 in 2 people in the UK will have cancer at some time of their lives. If you are one of them, this book is for you. It is packed with straightforward tips and clear guidance about dealing with every aspect of cancer and its treatment, focussed into 30 main topics. It also includes an extensive list of recommended books to read, websites to explore and facts and figures. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Bald is better with earrings. A survivor’s guide to getting through breast cancer'

Bald is better with earrings. A survivor’s guide to getting through breast cancer (2015)

HarperCollins

When Andrea Hutton was diagnosed with breast cancer, she wanted to know everything. She voraciously read books, articles, and websites and talked to everyone she knew. But nothing prepared her for what the surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation would feel like. Were there tricks that could ease her pain and discomfort? What was “fatigue” and how would it affect her? At what exact moment would her hair fall out and how? Hutton wanted what she could not find: a clear how-to guide for the cancer girl she had become. Bald Is Better with Earrings is Hutton’s answer for women diagnosed with breast cancer: a straightforward handbook, leavened with humor and inspiration, to shepherd them though the experience. Warm and down-to-earth, Hutton explains what to expect and walks you through this intense and emotional process: tests, surgery, chemo, losing your hair and shaving your head, being bald, radiation treatments. Hutton offers a wealth of invaluable advice—from tricks for surviving chemo, to treating your skin during radiation, to keeping track of meds—and includes a practical list of tips for each stage of the process at the end of every chapter. Compassionate, friendly, and shaped by Hutton’s first-hand knowledge, Bald Is Better with Earrings is the comprehensive, essential companion for anyone dealing with breast cancer. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'How to live well with chronic pain and illness'

How to live well with chronic pain and illness (2015)

Wisdom Publications

Comfort, understanding, and advice for those who are suffering--and those who care for them. Chronic illness creates many challenges, from career crises and relationship issues to struggles with self-blame, personal identity, and isolation. Toni Bernhard addresses these challenges and many more, using practical examples to illustrate how mindfulness, equanimity, and compassion can help readers make peace with a life turned upside down. In her characteristic conversational style, Bernhard shows how to cope and make the most of life despite the challenges of chronic illness. Benefit from: Mindfulness exercises to mitigate physical and emotional pain Concrete advice for negotiating the everyday hurdles of medical appointments, household chores, and social obligations Tools for navigating the strains illness can place on relationships Several chapters are directed toward family and friends of the chronically ill, helping them to understand what their loved one is going through and how they can help. Humorous and empathetic, Bernhard shares her own struggles and setbacks with unflinching honesty, offering invaluable support in the search to find peace and well-being. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer survivors club'

The cancer survivors club (2015)

Oneworld Publications

The Cancer Survivors Club is a collection of truly inspirational, uplifting and assuring survival stories. These poignant personal accounts from normal people, demonstrate an extraordinary determination to survive against the odds. It proves with survival rates doubling, anything is possible. Unfortunately cancer affects everyone; worldwide there are around 12.7 million new cases diagnosed each year. Every two minutes someone in the UK is diagnosed with cancer. The Cancer Survivors Club has an excellent mix of stories, from the most common cancer, to the rarest. Some of the cancer types mentioned are; brain, bowel, breast, pancreatic, spinal, testicular, leukaemia, nasal and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Included in the book are a number of Chris Geiger's cheerful newspaper columns, including his humorous account of a prostate examination, getting sunburnt on a crowded beach and his Guinness World Record article. The Cancer Survivors Club will provide anyone touched by cancer with hope, strength and encouragement. Each story is written from the survivors or families own perspective, offering a very warm, friendly style of writing. This relaxed and sometimes humorous approach makes The Cancer Survivors Club an informative, positive and inspirational book that the reader will be able to relate to and gain strength from. Many cancer patients and those around them find the gruelling treatments very hard to cope with, they often feel very alone and isolated. This book allows anyone affected by the disease to focus their attention on surviving, ultimately making it their goal to share their story in future editions. Most patients have times when they feel they are the only person going through cancer treatment and have nobody to talk with. It is also a very difficult time for people close to the patient who have no previous experience in dealing with this disease. The Cancer Survivors Club is a must-read for the millions of cancer patients worldwide and a book of great support for their family and friends. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'There's something I've been dying to tell you'

There's something I've been dying to tell you (2014)

Coronet (Hodder & Stoughton)

In 2013 Lynda Bellingham was diagnosed with cancer. Having kept the details of her illness private, now for the very first time Lynda talks with beautiful poignancy about her life since her diagnosis, her family and how together they came to terms with a future they hadn't planned. Having been told that she only has a matter of months left to live and writing this in what will be her final days, There's something I’ve been dying to tell you is a brave and brutally honest memoir and yet Lynda also manages to spread her infectious warmth and humour, bringing light to a very dark time. Woven into this very moving and brave story are extraordinary, colourful tales of her acting and family life that will enlighten and entertain as well as the journey that Lynda has taken to find the family of her birth father having already suffered heartache in her search for her birth mother. In the search for her father's family, Lynda finds a family with a history in entertainment showing that acting was always in the blood. Lynda Bellingham was a tremendously gifted storyteller with a rich collection of tales of love, loss and laughter and this book brings her kind heart, courage and emotion to the page in vivid detail. Lynda's story is an affecting and at times heart-breaking one but it is so often laugh-out-loud too and ultimately the way Lynda tells her life story will serve as a great inspiration. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The c list. Colons, clinics, chemo and (quite a lot of cake): how I survived bowel cancer'

The c list. Colons, clinics, chemo and (quite a lot of cake): how I survived bowel cancer (2014)

Watkins Publishing

When facing with advanced cancer, the first thing this author did was look for other books from long time survivors of stage 4 bowel cancer to give her something to hold on to. Finding none, she wrote her own. With a wicked, taboo-breaking sense of humour and a gift for practicality, she shares her experiences and the lists she made to gain some control over what quickly became an unpredictable life. Both funny and poignant, she vividly describes the absurd situations she finds herself in from a brutally flippant surgeon to dating after cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The iceberg. A memoir'

The iceberg. A memoir (2014)

Atlantic Books

In 2008 the art critic Tom Lubbock was diagnosed with a brain tumour. The tumour was located in the area controlling speech and language, and would eventually rob him of the ability to speak. He died early in 2011. Marion Coutts was his wife. In short bursts of beautiful, textured prose, Coutts describes the eighteen months leading up to her partner's death. This book is an account of a family unit, man, woman, young child, under assault, and how the three of them fought to keep it intact. Written with extraordinary narrative force and power, The Iceberg is almost shocking in its rawness. It charts the deterioration of Tom's speech even as it records the developing language of his child. Fury, selfishness, grief, indignity and impotence are all examined and brought to light. Yet out of this comes a rare story about belonging, an 'adventure of being and dying'. This book is a celebration of each other, friends, family, art, work, love and language. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'How to feel better. Practical ways to recover from illness and injury'

How to feel better. Practical ways to recover from illness and injury (2013)

Piatkus (Little, Brown Book Group)

In days gone by, people understood that a knock to your health takes its toll on your emotions, your relationships, your morale, your 'spirit'. But these days, we think that if the doctor has waved you off, then you are 'better'. If only it were this simple. The truth is that when your body takes a serious knock so does your mind - your thoughts and feelings. Often people feel worried, confused, lonely, depressed, unsupported or overwhelmed. You may be grappling with ongoing physical challenges: disability, pain, treatment side effects, sleep problems and fatigue. And you may have practical concerns over finances or work - or may simply be trying to 'adjust'. That's when this new book, from the authors of The Cancer Survivor's Companion (highly commended by the BMA and winner of the Guild of Health Writers' Best Health Book 2012), will prove invaluable. It offers simple, practical ways to find a path through the space between illness and health. (Publisher)

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