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Publications directory

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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 51

Cover image of 'Tea & chemo. Fighting cancer, living life'

Tea & chemo. Fighting cancer, living life (2015)

Urbane Publications Limited

At the age of 45, wife and mother Jackie Buxton was diagnosed with breast cancer. Lurching between the crippling fear that the cancer had spread, and the great comfort of knowing she was one of the lucky ones who could be treated, she did what she always does when life presents her with a challenge: she wrote it down. Jackie quickly realised that even with cancer, life was far from bad. Never known for her scientific prowess, she nonetheless became a 'bit of an expert' - at least in the field of hair loss, water retention and biscuits - and decided to use her writing to share experiences and help others recognise you don't have to be defined by your cancer. Tea & Chemo is full of laughter, tears, honesty and hope, and offers inspirational words to everyone facing the life challenges that cancer inevitably brings. All proceeds from the sales of Tea & Chemo will go to three incredibly important charities, whose compassionate care and professionalism make the difference to so many lives: The Haven, Breast Cancer Now and The Robert Ogden Macmillan Centre, Harrogate. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The breast cancer cookbook'

The breast cancer cookbook (2015)

Quadrille Publishing Ltd

A specifically tailored lifestyle cookbook to combat breast cancer, from surgical oncologist Professor Mo Keshtgar. Breast cancer is by far the most common cancer in women, affecting 1 in 8 women in the UK. It is now known that diet and lifestyle are significant risk factors in the development of the disease. Adopting a healthier diet can reduce the risk of getting breast cancer and improve the survival of patients who have been diagnosed. Breast cancer specialist Mo Keshtgar takes you through the risk factors and specific dietary associations with breast cancer, including phytoestrogens, fruit and vegetables, fats and dairy products. Advice on foods to avoid, foods to eat in moderation and foods to eat more of follows, with simple suggestions as to how to achieve these changes. The enticing collection of over 100 recipes covers breakfasts, soups, salads, fish and shellfish, poultry and meat, vegetarian dishes, treats and drinks. All the dishes have been specifically created to take in all the dietary considerations linked to breast cancer and the possible side effects of treatments. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Thirty things about cancer. A guide to getting through'

Thirty things about cancer. A guide to getting through (2015)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

1 in 2 people in the UK will have cancer at some time of their lives. If you are one of them, this book is for you. It is packed with straightforward tips and clear guidance about dealing with every aspect of cancer and its treatment, focussed into 30 main topics. It also includes an extensive list of recommended books to read, websites to explore and facts and figures. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Bald is better with earrings. A survivor’s guide to getting through breast cancer'

Bald is better with earrings. A survivor’s guide to getting through breast cancer (2015)

HarperCollins

When Andrea Hutton was diagnosed with breast cancer, she wanted to know everything. She voraciously read books, articles, and websites and talked to everyone she knew. But nothing prepared her for what the surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation would feel like. Were there tricks that could ease her pain and discomfort? What was “fatigue” and how would it affect her? At what exact moment would her hair fall out and how? Hutton wanted what she could not find: a clear how-to guide for the cancer girl she had become. Bald Is Better with Earrings is Hutton’s answer for women diagnosed with breast cancer: a straightforward handbook, leavened with humor and inspiration, to shepherd them though the experience. Warm and down-to-earth, Hutton explains what to expect and walks you through this intense and emotional process: tests, surgery, chemo, losing your hair and shaving your head, being bald, radiation treatments. Hutton offers a wealth of invaluable advice—from tricks for surviving chemo, to treating your skin during radiation, to keeping track of meds—and includes a practical list of tips for each stage of the process at the end of every chapter. Compassionate, friendly, and shaped by Hutton’s first-hand knowledge, Bald Is Better with Earrings is the comprehensive, essential companion for anyone dealing with breast cancer. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'How to live well with chronic pain and illness'

How to live well with chronic pain and illness (2015)

Wisdom Publications

Comfort, understanding, and advice for those who are suffering--and those who care for them. Chronic illness creates many challenges, from career crises and relationship issues to struggles with self-blame, personal identity, and isolation. Toni Bernhard addresses these challenges and many more, using practical examples to illustrate how mindfulness, equanimity, and compassion can help readers make peace with a life turned upside down. In her characteristic conversational style, Bernhard shows how to cope and make the most of life despite the challenges of chronic illness. Benefit from: Mindfulness exercises to mitigate physical and emotional pain Concrete advice for negotiating the everyday hurdles of medical appointments, household chores, and social obligations Tools for navigating the strains illness can place on relationships Several chapters are directed toward family and friends of the chronically ill, helping them to understand what their loved one is going through and how they can help. Humorous and empathetic, Bernhard shares her own struggles and setbacks with unflinching honesty, offering invaluable support in the search to find peace and well-being. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer survivors club'

The cancer survivors club (2015)

Oneworld Publications

The Cancer Survivors Club is a collection of truly inspirational, uplifting and assuring survival stories. These poignant personal accounts from normal people, demonstrate an extraordinary determination to survive against the odds. It proves with survival rates doubling, anything is possible. Unfortunately cancer affects everyone; worldwide there are around 12.7 million new cases diagnosed each year. Every two minutes someone in the UK is diagnosed with cancer. The Cancer Survivors Club has an excellent mix of stories, from the most common cancer, to the rarest. Some of the cancer types mentioned are; brain, bowel, breast, pancreatic, spinal, testicular, leukaemia, nasal and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Included in the book are a number of Chris Geiger's cheerful newspaper columns, including his humorous account of a prostate examination, getting sunburnt on a crowded beach and his Guinness World Record article. The Cancer Survivors Club will provide anyone touched by cancer with hope, strength and encouragement. Each story is written from the survivors or families own perspective, offering a very warm, friendly style of writing. This relaxed and sometimes humorous approach makes The Cancer Survivors Club an informative, positive and inspirational book that the reader will be able to relate to and gain strength from. Many cancer patients and those around them find the gruelling treatments very hard to cope with, they often feel very alone and isolated. This book allows anyone affected by the disease to focus their attention on surviving, ultimately making it their goal to share their story in future editions. Most patients have times when they feel they are the only person going through cancer treatment and have nobody to talk with. It is also a very difficult time for people close to the patient who have no previous experience in dealing with this disease. The Cancer Survivors Club is a must-read for the millions of cancer patients worldwide and a book of great support for their family and friends. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'There's something I've been dying to tell you'

There's something I've been dying to tell you (2014)

Coronet (Hodder & Stoughton)

In 2013 Lynda Bellingham was diagnosed with cancer. Having kept the details of her illness private, now for the very first time Lynda talks with beautiful poignancy about her life since her diagnosis, her family and how together they came to terms with a future they hadn't planned. Having been told that she only has a matter of months left to live and writing this in what will be her final days, There's something I’ve been dying to tell you is a brave and brutally honest memoir and yet Lynda also manages to spread her infectious warmth and humour, bringing light to a very dark time. Woven into this very moving and brave story are extraordinary, colourful tales of her acting and family life that will enlighten and entertain as well as the journey that Lynda has taken to find the family of her birth father having already suffered heartache in her search for her birth mother. In the search for her father's family, Lynda finds a family with a history in entertainment showing that acting was always in the blood. Lynda Bellingham was a tremendously gifted storyteller with a rich collection of tales of love, loss and laughter and this book brings her kind heart, courage and emotion to the page in vivid detail. Lynda's story is an affecting and at times heart-breaking one but it is so often laugh-out-loud too and ultimately the way Lynda tells her life story will serve as a great inspiration. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The c list. Colons, clinics, chemo and (quite a lot of cake): how I survived bowel cancer'

The c list. Colons, clinics, chemo and (quite a lot of cake): how I survived bowel cancer (2014)

Watkins Publishing

When facing with advanced cancer, the first thing this author did was look for other books from long time survivors of stage 4 bowel cancer to give her something to hold on to. Finding none, she wrote her own. With a wicked, taboo-breaking sense of humour and a gift for practicality, she shares her experiences and the lists she made to gain some control over what quickly became an unpredictable life. Both funny and poignant, she vividly describes the absurd situations she finds herself in from a brutally flippant surgeon to dating after cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The iceberg. A memoir'

The iceberg. A memoir (2014)

Atlantic Books

In 2008 the art critic Tom Lubbock was diagnosed with a brain tumour. The tumour was located in the area controlling speech and language, and would eventually rob him of the ability to speak. He died early in 2011. Marion Coutts was his wife. In short bursts of beautiful, textured prose, Coutts describes the eighteen months leading up to her partner's death. This book is an account of a family unit, man, woman, young child, under assault, and how the three of them fought to keep it intact. Written with extraordinary narrative force and power, The Iceberg is almost shocking in its rawness. It charts the deterioration of Tom's speech even as it records the developing language of his child. Fury, selfishness, grief, indignity and impotence are all examined and brought to light. Yet out of this comes a rare story about belonging, an 'adventure of being and dying'. This book is a celebration of each other, friends, family, art, work, love and language. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'How to feel better. Practical ways to recover from illness and injury'

How to feel better. Practical ways to recover from illness and injury (2013)

Piatkus (Little, Brown Book Group)

In days gone by, people understood that a knock to your health takes its toll on your emotions, your relationships, your morale, your 'spirit'. But these days, we think that if the doctor has waved you off, then you are 'better'. If only it were this simple. The truth is that when your body takes a serious knock so does your mind - your thoughts and feelings. Often people feel worried, confused, lonely, depressed, unsupported or overwhelmed. You may be grappling with ongoing physical challenges: disability, pain, treatment side effects, sleep problems and fatigue. And you may have practical concerns over finances or work - or may simply be trying to 'adjust'. That's when this new book, from the authors of The Cancer Survivor's Companion (highly commended by the BMA and winner of the Guild of Health Writers' Best Health Book 2012), will prove invaluable. It offers simple, practical ways to find a path through the space between illness and health. (Publisher)

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