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Publications directory

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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 50

Cover image of 'Cellmates. Our lessons in cancer, life, love and loss'

Cellmates. Our lessons in cancer, life, love and loss (2013)

Saraband

I'm Rose. John and I shared nearly eight years of our lives together. For the last three years of our relationship cancer anchored us together. That's not as grim as it might sound. This is our story. A story of how two ordinary people live with the diagnosis, the check-ups, the disappointments, the relief, the questions, the answers, the operations, the recovery, the emergencies, the denial, the acceptance, the anger, the pain, the loss, the love, the fear, the frustration - and the happiness. Shortly before he died, John made Rose promise to share their story - to tell what they had learned, practically and emotionally, and convey the hope they found even in the darkest of times. He had discovered her hidden stash of letters and diary entries, which she'd been writing to keep herself sane, neither censoring nor intending them to be read. The result is an astonishing, searingly honest, real-time account that reveals our profound capacity for love and how the human spirit can endure the most harrowing of tests to emerge dauntless, flying free. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The end of your life book club'

The end of your life book club (2013)

Two Roads

When New York publisher Will Schwalbe’s mother was diagnosed with cancer, he went with her to her treatments. To while away the time in the hospital they distracted themselves with talk of the books they’d read and shared and recommended and, in Will’s case, sometimes pretended to read. But while you might pretend to a bookseller you’ve read a book you don’t pretend to your mother who is dying of cancer. So they read and re-read and explored that particular bond of books they’d always shared. Thus was born a very special book club with just two members: a mother and a son. The ones they choose range from classic to popular, from fantastic to spiritual, and we hear their passion for reading and their love for each other in their intimate and searching discussions. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Love for now'

Love for now (2012)

Impress Books

The sun has just popped out, after a heavy shower; the washing line a string of pearls. It's time to live. On Valentine s Day, 2006, Anthony Wilson was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a cancer of the lymphatic system. He was 42. In this journal of the days that followed he contemplates love, family and mortality alongside celebrations of Peter Osgood, Ivor Cutler and cooking chicken while listening to funk. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Mortality'

Mortality (2012)

Atlantic Books

During the US book tour for his memoir, Hitch-22, Christopher Hitchens collapsed in his New York hotel room to excoriating pain in his chest and thorax. As he would later write in the first of a series of deeply moving Vanity Fair pieces, he was being deported 'from the country of the well across the stark frontier that marks off the land of malady.' Over the next year he underwent the brutal gamut of modern cancer treatment, enduring catastrophic levels of suffering and eventually losing his voice. Mortality is the most meditative piece of writing Hitchens has ever produced; at once an unsparingly honest account of the ravages of his disease, an examination of cancer etiquette, and the coda to a lifetime of fierce debate and peerless prose. In this eloquent confrontation with mortality, Hitchens returns a human face to a disease that has become a contemporary cipher of suffering. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Mum's list. A mother's life lessons to the husband and sons she left behind'

Mum's list. A mother's life lessons to the husband and sons she left behind (2012)

Penguin

On her deathbed, Kate Greene's only concern was for her two little boys, Reef and Finn, and her loving husband, Singe. She knew she'd be leaving them behind very soon. Over her last few days, Kate created Mum's List. The couple talked and cried together as she wrote her thoughts and wishes down, trying to help the man she loved create the best life for their boys after she was gone. It wasn't the first time Singe and Kate had faced the spectre of death. Four years earlier, doctors discovered a large lump in baby Reef's abdomen. Kate, pregnant with Finn, was so distressed that she gave birth dangerously early. Both boys pulled through, but afterwards Kate received the diagnosis that every woman dreads (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Thrive. The Bah! guide to wellness after cancer'

Thrive. The Bah! guide to wellness after cancer (2012)

Hay House

There's still a part of us that thinks surviving cancer is a bit of freakish good fortune - the medical equivalent of having a cannonball go right through your middle and living to tell the tale - and so often it's hard to know how to 'do' life after cancer. Thrive: The Bah! Guide to Wellness after cancer focuses on moving on from a major physical, social and psychological trauma. Like Stephanie's first book, How I Said Bah! to cancer: A Guide to Thinking, Laughing, Living, and Dancing Your Way Through, Thrive uses a blend of storytelling, practical advice, humour, thinking techniques and strategies, visualisations, meditations, questions, candour and common sense designed to help those who have had a cancer to get from survival to a place where they are truly thriving. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'When I die. Lessons from the death zone'

When I die. Lessons from the death zone (2012)

Little, Brown

On 29 January 2008 Philip Gould was told he had cancer. He was stoical, and set about his treatment, determined to fight his illness. In the face of difficult decisions he sought always to understand the disease and the various medical options open to him, supported by his wife Gail and their two daughters, Georgia and Grace. In 2010, after two hard years of chemotherapy and surgery, the tests came up clear - Philip appeared to have won the battle. But his work as a key strategist for the Labour party took its toll, and feeling ill six months later, he insisted on one extra, precautionary test, which told him that the cancer had returned. Thus began Philip's long, painful but ultimately optimistic journey towards death, during which time he began to appreciate and make sense of his life, his work and his relationships in a way he had never thought possible. He realized something that he had never heard articulated before: death need not be only negative or painful, it can be life-affirming and revelatory. Written during the last few months of his life, When I Die describes the journey Philip took with his illness, leaving to us what he called his lessons from the death zone. This courageous, profoundly moving and inspiring work is as valuable a legacy to the world as anyone could wish to bestow - hugely uplifting, beautifully written with extraordinary insight. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The c-word'

The c-word (2010)

Arrow Books

Carrie Bradshaw fell in Dior, I fell in Debenhams. It was May 2008, and it was spectacular. Uncomfortable heels + slippy floor + head turned by a cocktail dress = thwack. Arms stretched overhead, teeth cracking on floor tiles, chest and knees breaking the fall. It was theatrical, exaggerated, a perfect 6.0. And it was Significant Moment #1 in discovering that I had grade-three breast cancer. The last thing Lisa Lynch had expected to put on her 'things to do before you're 30' list was beating breast cancer, but them's the breaks. So with her life on hold, and her mind close to capacity with unspoken fears, questions and emotions, she turned to her Mac and started blogging about the frustrating, life-altering, sheer pain-in-the-arse inconvenience of getting breast cancer at the age of 28. The C-Word is an unflinchingly honest and darkly humorous account of Lisa’s battle with The Bullshit, as she came to call it. From the good days when she could almost pretend it wasn't happening, to the bad days, when she couldn't bear to wake up, Lisa's story is emotional, heartbreaking and often hilarious. The C-Word will make you laugh and cry, and ultimately reaffirm your faith in life. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The selfish pig's guide to caring'

The selfish pig's guide to caring (2009)

Piatkus (Little, Brown Book Group)

Six million people in the UK provide unpaid care for disabled or elderly relatives or neighbours, often unnoticed. Their job is long, lonely and hard, yet there is limited support and no formal training. As a result, carers suffer frequent damage to physical and mental health and are liable to feelings of guilt brought on by fatigue and isolation. Hugh Marriott, a carer himself, has written this book for them - and also for the rest of us who hadn't realised what went on behind those closed doors. The Selfish Pig's Guide to Caring airs topics such as sex, thoughts of murder, coping with incontinence and dealing with friends and officials who fail to understand. It's a must-read for anyone involved with caring. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'What can I do to help? 75 practical ideas for family and friends from cancer's frontline'

What can I do to help? 75 practical ideas for family and friends from cancer's frontline (2005)

Short Books

'I count myself the luckiest and unluckiest woman in London.' Deborah Hutton's discovery that the niggling cough which had been troubling her for a couple of months was actually an aggressive lung cancer that had already invaded her bones and lymphatic system marked the beginning of a brand-new learning curve - a personal odyssey that taught her to let go of her super-competent I-can-handle-it-myself persona and gratefully accept the huge amount of help beamed at her by her close-knit family and 'world class' network of friends and neighbours. From her own experience and out of her conversations with fellow members of the Cancer Club - 'the only club I can think of which is both rigorously exclusive and which has no waiting list, ever' - comes this anthology of supremely practical examples of ways in which friends and family, often themselves reeling from the shock of the diagnosis and feeling just as helpless and at a loss as to know what to do, can make a real, substantial difference. 'What can I do to help?' she writes. Well, stand by, because the answer is 'Plenty'. (Publisher)

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