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Publications directory

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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 50

Cover image of 'There's something I've been dying to tell you'

There's something I've been dying to tell you (2014)

Coronet (Hodder & Stoughton)

In 2013 Lynda Bellingham was diagnosed with cancer. Having kept the details of her illness private, now for the very first time Lynda talks with beautiful poignancy about her life since her diagnosis, her family and how together they came to terms with a future they hadn't planned. Having been told that she only has a matter of months left to live and writing this in what will be her final days, There's something I’ve been dying to tell you is a brave and brutally honest memoir and yet Lynda also manages to spread her infectious warmth and humour, bringing light to a very dark time. Woven into this very moving and brave story are extraordinary, colourful tales of her acting and family life that will enlighten and entertain as well as the journey that Lynda has taken to find the family of her birth father having already suffered heartache in her search for her birth mother. In the search for her father's family, Lynda finds a family with a history in entertainment showing that acting was always in the blood. Lynda Bellingham was a tremendously gifted storyteller with a rich collection of tales of love, loss and laughter and this book brings her kind heart, courage and emotion to the page in vivid detail. Lynda's story is an affecting and at times heart-breaking one but it is so often laugh-out-loud too and ultimately the way Lynda tells her life story will serve as a great inspiration. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The c list. Colons, clinics, chemo and (quite a lot of cake): how I survived bowel cancer'

The c list. Colons, clinics, chemo and (quite a lot of cake): how I survived bowel cancer (2014)

Watkins Publishing

When facing with advanced cancer, the first thing this author did was look for other books from long time survivors of stage 4 bowel cancer to give her something to hold on to. Finding none, she wrote her own. With a wicked, taboo-breaking sense of humour and a gift for practicality, she shares her experiences and the lists she made to gain some control over what quickly became an unpredictable life. Both funny and poignant, she vividly describes the absurd situations she finds herself in from a brutally flippant surgeon to dating after cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The iceberg. A memoir'

The iceberg. A memoir (2014)

Atlantic Books

In 2008 the art critic Tom Lubbock was diagnosed with a brain tumour. The tumour was located in the area controlling speech and language, and would eventually rob him of the ability to speak. He died early in 2011. Marion Coutts was his wife. In short bursts of beautiful, textured prose, Coutts describes the eighteen months leading up to her partner's death. This book is an account of a family unit, man, woman, young child, under assault, and how the three of them fought to keep it intact. Written with extraordinary narrative force and power, The Iceberg is almost shocking in its rawness. It charts the deterioration of Tom's speech even as it records the developing language of his child. Fury, selfishness, grief, indignity and impotence are all examined and brought to light. Yet out of this comes a rare story about belonging, an 'adventure of being and dying'. This book is a celebration of each other, friends, family, art, work, love and language. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Until further notice, I am alive'

Until further notice, I am alive (2014)

Granta Books

In 2008, Tom Lubbock was diagnosed with a brain tumour, and told he had only one or two years to live. In this remarkable record of those years, lived out in three-month intervals between scans, he examines the question of how to live with death in sight. As the tumour progressed, Tom engaged intensely and imaginatively with work, art, friends, and his wife and their young son, while trying to remain focused on the fact of his impending death. His tumour was located in the area of the brain associated with language, and he describes losing control over the spoken and written word and the resources he drew on to keep communicating; a struggle which brought him ever closer to the mysteries of the origin of speech. As the Independent's chief art critic, he was renowned for the clarity and unconventionality of his writing, and the same fierce intelligence permeates this extraordinary memoir. This is a book written by a man wholly engaged with life even as it ends. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cancer is my teacher'

Cancer is my teacher (2014)

Quartet Books

Every two minutes someone in the UK is diagnosed with cancer. Lucy O'Donnell was herself three years ago. Cancer is My Teacher is her story, describing unflinchingly how she has turned the disease into a positive experience - and how you can do the same. Lucy's approach is determined but disciplined, clinical but also holistic. By addressing the physical, emotional, and spiritual aspects of cancer, Lucy covers the whole spectrum of the disease - including how to tell the family, the dos and donts of communicating with a patient, the side-effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy - and gives practical advice on how to keep looking your best and even what to pack for surgery. Cancer is My Teacher offers guidance for anyone in the early stages of diagnosis, in treatment or trying to readjust afterwards. It also helps family and loved ones to understand what they're going through - and, above all, carries a message of hope for everyone touched by cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Probably nothing. A diary of not-your-average nine months'

Probably nothing. A diary of not-your-average nine months (2014)

Viking

A moving, funny and inspiring graphic memoir by a woman who discovered she had cancer whilst she was pregnant: 'I am glad. And then sad. (But) Mum's bought me a furry snood. 'Ooh, lovely!'' At 31, Matilda Tristram was 17 weeks pregnant and looking forward to having her first baby. Then she discovered she had cancer. This touching and hilarious graphic memoir, which is never morose or self-pitying, starts at the moment Matilda was diagnosed and ends when her course of chemotherapy finishes in October 2013. Recording the awkward conversations, the highs and lows of treatment, the mixed blessings of receiving 'Get Well' cards, and the reality of still having to queue too long for croissants, Matilda captures her experiences with characteristic style and warmth. Along the way she cherishes the small details of life, and learns not to sweat the big things. Her beautiful and boisterous son was born without complications and is reliably keeping her up most nights. Charming, witty and uplifting - this unique and beautifully illustrated book will leave you cherishing the good things in life, and ready to face your own challenges. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer survivor's companion. Practical ways to cope with your feelings after cancer'

The cancer survivor's companion. Practical ways to cope with your feelings after cancer (2013)

Piatkus (Little, Brown Book Group)

Coping with life after cancer can be tough. The idea that the end of successful treatment brings relief and peace just isn't true for countless survivors. Many feel unexpectedly alone, worried and adrift. You're supposed to be getting your life 'back on track' but your life has changed. You have changed. With reassurance and understanding, Dr Frances Goodhart and Lucy Atkins help readers deal with the emotional fallout of cancer whether it's days, months or years since the treatment ended. Drawing on Dr Goodhart's extensive experience working in the NHS with cancer survivors, this guide is packed with practical and simple self-help tools to tackle issues such as worry and anxiety, depression and low mood, anger, low self-esteem and body image, relationships and sex, fatigue, sleep and relaxation. If you are a cancer survivor, this book will support you every step of the way. If you are supporting a loved one, friend, colleague or your patient, this is a vital read. Winner of the 2012 Best Health Book category in the Guild of Health Writers Awards and highly commended in the Popular Medicine category at the BMA Medical Book Awards 2012 this is the first UK book to look in depth at cancer survivorship and its emotional fallout. Government statistics indicate around 2 million people in the UK survive for at least 5 years post diagnosis and this figure is set to increase. This book will be an invaluable resource. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Gift of time'

Gift of time (2013)

Constable

An heartbreakingly honest and deeply moving memoir in the words of the son, his wife and his mother of her battle with cancer, from one of the UK's best loved travel writers. When his mother Joan was diagnosed with terminal cancer, Rory MacLean and his wife Katrin took her into their home. For five months, as their life fragmented and turned inward, they fought both to resist and to accept the inevitable. Each gave vent to their emotions in different ways, but all three kept a diary. Heartbreakingly honest and deeply moving, Gift of Time is the story of those days, in the words of a son, his wife and his mother. Woven together into a poignant meditation on life and death, they illuminate the courage and dignity of one woman who confronted what we all must face. Threaded through with wisdom and guilt, anger and acceptance, the story is punctuated by a family wedding and the hope of new life, by bin-bags of old letters and books rediscovered, by the end of winter and the first signs of spring. Powerful, raw and urgent, this slender volume is above all a celebration of life. Capturing every moment of beauty and pain it acknowledges that what survives all of us is love. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'How to feel better. Practical ways to recover from illness and injury'

How to feel better. Practical ways to recover from illness and injury (2013)

Piatkus (Little, Brown Book Group)

In days gone by, people understood that a knock to your health takes its toll on your emotions, your relationships, your morale, your 'spirit'. But these days, we think that if the doctor has waved you off, then you are 'better'. If only it were this simple. The truth is that when your body takes a serious knock so does your mind - your thoughts and feelings. Often people feel worried, confused, lonely, depressed, unsupported or overwhelmed. You may be grappling with ongoing physical challenges: disability, pain, treatment side effects, sleep problems and fatigue. And you may have practical concerns over finances or work - or may simply be trying to 'adjust'. That's when this new book, from the authors of The Cancer Survivor's Companion (highly commended by the BMA and winner of the Guild of Health Writers' Best Health Book 2012), will prove invaluable. It offers simple, practical ways to find a path through the space between illness and health. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Emotional support through breast cancer. The alternative handbook'

Emotional support through breast cancer. The alternative handbook (2013)

Radcliffe Publishing

This compassionate guide presents an array of new perspectives on the emotional effects of breast cancer and includes many personal testimonies from women who have been diagnosed with this disease. Written by a breast cancer survivor and practising psychologist, it shares practical ideas to help support sufferers at all stages, be it at diagnosis, during treatment or during life after the initial treatments are over. The concise, easy-to-read format includes exercises to develop an acceptance of thoughts and feelings, whilst the individual accounts validate the multitude of emotions felt by sufferers. It is a must for all breast cancer patients and sufferers, their families and friends. Its real-life approach, using first hand accounts, is also highly recommended for all health and social care professionals wanting a fresh approach to managing the emotional impacts of breast cancer. (Publisher)

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