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Publications directory

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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 24

Cover image of 'Love for now'

Love for now (2012)

Impress Books

The sun has just popped out, after a heavy shower; the washing line a string of pearls. It's time to live. On Valentine s Day, 2006, Anthony Wilson was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a cancer of the lymphatic system. He was 42. In this journal of the days that followed he contemplates love, family and mortality alongside celebrations of Peter Osgood, Ivor Cutler and cooking chicken while listening to funk. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Mum's list. A mother's life lessons to the husband and sons she left behind'

Mum's list. A mother's life lessons to the husband and sons she left behind (2012)

Penguin

On her deathbed, Kate Greene's only concern was for her two little boys, Reef and Finn, and her loving husband, Singe. She knew she'd be leaving them behind very soon. Over her last few days, Kate created Mum's List. The couple talked and cried together as she wrote her thoughts and wishes down, trying to help the man she loved create the best life for their boys after she was gone. It wasn't the first time Singe and Kate had faced the spectre of death. Four years earlier, doctors discovered a large lump in baby Reef's abdomen. Kate, pregnant with Finn, was so distressed that she gave birth dangerously early. Both boys pulled through, but afterwards Kate received the diagnosis that every woman dreads (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Mortality'

Mortality (2012)

Atlantic Books

During the US book tour for his memoir, Hitch-22, Christopher Hitchens collapsed in his New York hotel room to excoriating pain in his chest and thorax. As he would later write in the first of a series of deeply moving Vanity Fair pieces, he was being deported 'from the country of the well across the stark frontier that marks off the land of malady.' Over the next year he underwent the brutal gamut of modern cancer treatment, enduring catastrophic levels of suffering and eventually losing his voice. Mortality is the most meditative piece of writing Hitchens has ever produced; at once an unsparingly honest account of the ravages of his disease, an examination of cancer etiquette, and the coda to a lifetime of fierce debate and peerless prose. In this eloquent confrontation with mortality, Hitchens returns a human face to a disease that has become a contemporary cipher of suffering. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Thrive. The Bah! guide to wellness after cancer'

Thrive. The Bah! guide to wellness after cancer (2012)

Hay House

There's still a part of us that thinks surviving cancer is a bit of freakish good fortune - the medical equivalent of having a cannonball go right through your middle and living to tell the tale - and so often it's hard to know how to 'do' life after cancer. Thrive: The Bah! Guide to Wellness after cancer focuses on moving on from a major physical, social and psychological trauma. Like Stephanie's first book, How I Said Bah! to cancer: A Guide to Thinking, Laughing, Living, and Dancing Your Way Through, Thrive uses a blend of storytelling, practical advice, humour, thinking techniques and strategies, visualisations, meditations, questions, candour and common sense designed to help those who have had a cancer to get from survival to a place where they are truly thriving. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'When I die. Lessons from the death zone'

When I die. Lessons from the death zone (2012)

Little, Brown

On 29 January 2008 Philip Gould was told he had cancer. He was stoical, and set about his treatment, determined to fight his illness. In the face of difficult decisions he sought always to understand the disease and the various medical options open to him, supported by his wife Gail and their two daughters, Georgia and Grace. In 2010, after two hard years of chemotherapy and surgery, the tests came up clear - Philip appeared to have won the battle. But his work as a key strategist for the Labour party took its toll, and feeling ill six months later, he insisted on one extra, precautionary test, which told him that the cancer had returned. Thus began Philip's long, painful but ultimately optimistic journey towards death, during which time he began to appreciate and make sense of his life, his work and his relationships in a way he had never thought possible. He realized something that he had never heard articulated before: death need not be only negative or painful, it can be life-affirming and revelatory. Written during the last few months of his life, When I Die describes the journey Philip took with his illness, leaving to us what he called his lessons from the death zone. This courageous, profoundly moving and inspiring work is as valuable a legacy to the world as anyone could wish to bestow - hugely uplifting, beautifully written with extraordinary insight. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Milo and the restart button'

Milo and the restart button (2011)

Simon and Schuster

Starting over is like pressing the reset button on a game that makes you lose all your points and wipes out any of the good stuff you've spent hundreds of hours learning...Surviving the year is all Milo has to do. Start to finish in one whole piece...But it's not just a new school he's dealing with; it's a new house, a new neighbourhood - a whole new life. And it's one without his mum in it. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Not the last goodbye. Reflections on life, death, healing and cancer'

Not the last goodbye. Reflections on life, death, healing and cancer (2011)

Pan Macmillan

This is the story of an award-winning psychiatrist and neuroscientist who was diagnosed with a brain tumour by his own MRI machine at the age of thirty. It is the story of a doctor turned patient who, after overcoming cancer against the odds, started a twenty-year crusade to inform people about the disease and inspire them to take responsibility for their health. It is the story of a husband and father who is told that the cancer has returned, and that he only has a short time left. This is a story about dying. But most of all, it is a story about living. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'How I said Bah! to cancer. A guide to thinking, laughing, living and dancing your way through cancer'

How I said Bah! to cancer. A guide to thinking, laughing, living and dancing your way through cancer (2011)

Hay House

This book tells how one woman said 'Bah!' to cancer through thinking strategies, a proactive approach to treatment, and a determination to keep the rest of her life going and retain a sense of humour (most of the time!). It shares everything she learnt along the way, from the nature of cancer cells and chemotherapy drugs, to how she was able to help her friends and family to help her. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Being Sarah'

Being Sarah (2011)

Wordscapes

Being Sarah is Sarah Horton's personal story about breast cancer. As the shock of diagnosis subsides, Sarah starts looking for a treatment plan that suits her, searching for choices, and asks questions about all the medical drugs and treatment offered to her, from chemotherapy to hormone treatment. There are so many questions: in a field where so little is certain, what's best for Sarah? Why do we concentrate on cure rather than prevention? Is our terror about breast cancer sanitised by the 'pink' movement? And will I die? And there aren’t always answers. From the minutiae of getting through each day to the wider feelings of rage, hope, sadness, fear, loss, joy and helplessness, Being Sarah is about life, death, questions, options and choices. Breast cancer statistics in the UK are alarming, and the politics surrounding the illness perplexing. Mortality rates are falling, but diagnoses are rising. One in every nine women can now expect to be diagnosed with breast cancer at some time in her life, and - while we’re getting better at surviving - it’s happening more and more frequently. Sarah Horton is one of the 46,000 women diagnosed with breast cancer in the UK every year. This is her story. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Coping with the psychological effects of cancer'

Coping with the psychological effects of cancer (2010)

Sheldon Press

Cancer affects more than one in three of us. Until recently, the emphasis has been on battling cancer physically. Today, there is increasing recognition of the emotional aspect of having cancer, and survivorship and its issues are hot topics. This book tackles a sensitive subject in an upfront and practical way that acknowledges the uncomfortable and painful emotions associated with cancer. (Publisher)

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