Publications directory

Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 7 days a week, 8am-8pm

The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 103

Cover image of 'Living with a terminal illness. Support for you and those close to you'

Living with a terminal illness. Support for you and those close to you (April 2019)

Marie Curie

This booklet aims to help you understand your feelings and gives information about how to live well and get the most from your time. It’s divided into short chapters so you can read through it at your own pace. People caring for someone who is living with a terminal illness may also find this information useful. 

Cover image of 'How are you feeling? The emotional effects of cancer'

How are you feeling? The emotional effects of cancer (February 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Having cancer affects all areas of your life, including the way you feel. This booklet is about the main emotions that many people with cancer have. This may be after diagnosis, during treatment or after treatment has ended.

Cover image of 'How long have I got? The story of a ‘terminal’ cancer patient'

How long have I got? The story of a ‘terminal’ cancer patient (2019)

Independently published

Suitcases filled with medication. Life and death situations. Multiple organ removal. Risking everything to stay alive just one more day. And people still moan to you when they have a cold. Welcome to the life of a ‘terminal’ cancer patient. In January 2016 thirty-year-old Fi Munro was diagnosed with stage four ovarian cancer. Told from day one that her cancer was incurable and ‘terminal’, Fi faced unimaginable pain, heartache and suffering as the life she’d dreamed of was suddenly pulled away from her. Yet in the wake of this news she did not wallow. Instead she discovered a remarkable inner strength, resilience and, above all, a very dark sense of humour. Years later and she is still here, having outlived, in her opinion, two ‘very unreasonable’ prognoses. How Long Have I Got? is her inspiring story. Honest, open and often tear-jerking this is everything you wanted to know - and some stuff you’ll want to forget - about living with cancer and an important reminder that we are all terminal. Reading this will change your life forever. Fi Munro is a multi-award-winning researcher, author, blogger, speaker and mentor recognised internationally for her presentations and articles on her journey and the importance of holistic health. She has been featured in two BBC documentaries, in TV and radio shows, and in newspaper and magazine articles across the globe. Today she is healthier and happier than ever before and believes cancer saved her life. She is currently training to be a shaman and is excited for what the future holds. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Self-management and remote monitoring'

Self-management and remote monitoring (October 2018)

Lymphoma Action

More and more people are living longer after a diagnosis of lymphoma. This has prompted some hospitals to change the way they organise long-term management and follow-up for people who have finished treatment. This factsheet explains how self-management support and remote monitoring may be used for people who have finished treatment. It covers: Self-management; Self-management support; Remote monitoring; When to book an appointment; Life on self-management and remote monitoring.

Cover image of 'Transformation of lymphoma'

Transformation of lymphoma (April 2018)

Lymphoma Action

Low-grade (slow-growing) lymphoma can sometimes transform (change) into a faster-growing type of lymphoma. This factsheet explains what transformation is, who could be affected, and why and when it happens. It also describes the symptoms, treatment options and outlook.

Cover image of 'Clinical trials for lymphoma'

Clinical trials for lymphoma (December 2018)

Lymphoma Action

This booklet aims to explain what clinical trials are and what they might involve. It also describes some recent trials of importance for people with lymphoma. It includes the personal experiences of four people who took part in clinical trials for lymphoma.

Cover image of 'Lung cancer [Easy read]'

Lung cancer [Easy read] (December 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

An easy read booklet on the signs, symptoms, treatments and tests for lung cancer.  

Cover image of 'Talking about cancer and your feelings [Easy read]'

Talking about cancer and your feelings [Easy read] (May 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about how you can talk about cancer and share your feelings about cancer. You can find out how talking about cancer can help you.

Cover image of 'Claiming benefits when you have cancer [Easy read]'

Claiming benefits when you have cancer [Easy read] (September 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

An easy read booklet on claiming benefits when you have cancer.

Cover image of 'Help with the costs of cancer [Easy read]'

Help with the costs of cancer [Easy read] (September 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

An easy read booklet on help with costs when you have cancer.

Cover image of 'Breast cancer and how to spot it [Easy read]'

Breast cancer and how to spot it [Easy read] (2018)

Public Health England

Leaflet aimed at encouraging women over 70 to check their breasts regularly and to go to the doctor as soon as they notice any change.

Cover image of 'Never too young to grieve. Supporting children under 5 after the death of a parent'

Never too young to grieve. Supporting children under 5 after the death of a parent (2018)

Winston's Wish

A child’s early years are a time of development and change which helps shape the rest of their life. From newborn babies needing constant attention and care to curious children seeking new experiences, an immense amount of learning and change happen during this short period of time. A key focus of early childhood is the relationships that children form with the important people in their lives — usually parents, carers and siblings. Most children will form a strong, secure bond with these people, which enables them to feel safe, and encourages the curiosity that helps them to explore their world. Bereavement during a child’s early years interrupts the attachment that they have with that person. In the absence of strong memories of their own, it can be hard for a young child to remember the person who has died and to feel connected to them. This booklet is designed for parents, carers, childcare professionals and other adults supporting children up to the age of 5 who have experienced the death of a parent or carer. It offers information and ideas as well as some activities which we hope will benefit children and their families. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Spike and the blue chair'

Spike and the blue chair (2018)

Austin Macauley

The writer tells the story of her family and their transition through grief and bereavement. However, the story is told through the eyes of Spike the Cat, who joins them at the start of their crisis and takes on the role of observer, protector and helper. Spike is curious about many things, but he is especially curious about the blue chair. One day, he discovers its magic and begins to see how he can help his family by gently leading them onto its seat. He is a cat with purpose, helping his family through the 'rubbish days' that slowly change into new hope and fresh beginnings. He watches as they become a new blended family and learns what it means to move on with courage and love. "For cats know what you're thinking, they know just how you feel; They soak up all your sadness and purr with steadfast zeal." 

Cover image of 'Stronger than before. Take charge of your healing to survive and thrive with breast cancer'

Stronger than before. Take charge of your healing to survive and thrive with breast cancer (2018)

Hay House

Stronger than before is the book Alison Porter went looking for when she first learned she had breast cancer. It's a practical handbook to guide you - and your friends and family - through every stage of the illness, from early diagnosis to treatment choices, and ultimately to a life beyond cancer. In this book, you'll discover: the different types of breast cancer, what to ask your doctor and how to make the choices that are right for you; self-help techniques on every level - physical, emotional, mental and spiritual - to support you through treatment and recovery; how to view your illness as a catalyst for post-traumatic growth, and move on with your life with greater meaning and purpose; your options for reconstruction and how to maintain a cancer-preventative lifestyle; advice for friends and family, so they can be truly helpful in how they offer you support. Written by a breast cancer survivor and thriver, Stronger than before contains invaluable information, guidance and tips, as well as tools and techniques to help you emerge from this life-changing experience healthier, more purposeful and stronger than before. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Testicular and prostate cancer'

Testicular and prostate cancer (May 2017)

Action Cancer

Z-card with facts about prostate cancer (what is the prostate, the symptoms of prostate cancer) and testicular cancer (what it is, the causes, how to examine the testicles, what to do of a change is noticed).

Cover image of 'How Macmillan Cancer Support can help you [Easy read]'

How Macmillan Cancer Support can help you [Easy read] (October 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

A booklet explaining how Macmillan Cancer Support can help people affected by cancer. It talks about the support line, information and support services, Macmillan professionals and practical ways Macmillan can help. 

Cover image of 'A guide for young people looking after someone with cancer'

A guide for young people looking after someone with cancer (October 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Booklet for young people aged under 18 who are looking after someone who has cancer. It has been written by young people who have been through the experience and covers some of the practical issues young carers may face.

Cover image of 'Hair everywhere'

Hair everywhere (2017)

Istros Books

Hair Everywhere is the story of one family and how they manage to cope when the mother is diagnosed with cancer. It is a delicate tale that balances itself between the generations, revealing their strengths and weaknesses in times of trouble. It is also a story about how roles within a family can change when things become challenging, due to sickness or death, allowing some to grow and others to fade. Ultimately, this is a book about life; full of humour and absurdity as well as sadness, and set against an everyday background where the ordinary takes on new significance and colour. Tea Tulic’s debut novel is a brave glance at the human condition. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The finch in my brain'

The finch in my brain (2017)

Hodder & Stoughton

When film producer Martino Sclavi began experiencing intense headaches, he attributed them to his frenetic lifestyle. As it turned out, he had grade 4 brain cancer and was given 18 months to live. After undergoing brain surgery - while awake - Martino found he had lost the ability to recognise words. His response was to close his eyes and begin to move his fingers across the keyboard to write this, an account of life before diagnosis and since. Defying all predictions Martino is still very much alive, words read out to him by the monotone of a computerised voice he calls Alex. But he must now live in a new way. This book - that he has written but cannot read - charts the effects of his experience: on his relationship with his young son, his marriage, his work and with himself. In the wake of his illness, everything must be reconfigured and Martino is made to question the habits, dreams and beliefs of his old life and confront the present. What he finds is strange and beautiful. Searching for the words between life and death, Sclavi shows that with determination and a subtle, persistent sense of humour, it is possible to change the story of our lives. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Ladies...What is it that only men have but can cause problems or worry... The Prostate! A simple guide'

Ladies...What is it that only men have but can cause problems or worry... The Prostate! A simple guide (July 2016)

Prostate Scotland

This leaflet for women has information about prostate cancer with tips to help them encourage men to see a doctor, change their lifestyle and talk about the issues.

Cover image of 'Ladies...What is it that only men have but can cause problems or worry... The Prostate! A simple guide [Large print]'

Ladies...What is it that only men have but can cause problems or worry... The Prostate! A simple guide [Large print] (July 2016)

Prostate Scotland

This leaflet for women has information about prostate cancer with tips to help them encourage men to see a doctor, change their lifestyle and talk about the issues.

Cover image of 'The shock factor. Sarah's story – beating breast cancer one day at a time'

The shock factor. Sarah's story – beating breast cancer one day at a time (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

The door handle started to turn and I knew this was the moment that could change my life forever. Mr Mahadev appeared with another staff member. He introduced himself and then introduced Sally, a breast care nurse, and sat down beside me. He started to go through my notes: family history, the results of the mammogram and the biopsy. Then he delivered the devastating news... I’m really sorry but the mammogram has shown two tumours in the left breast. Sarah Pickles was a normal 32-year-old married woman with a young daughter. On 22nd September 2014 her life changed as she was given the devastating news that she had a triple-negative breast cancer. Read about how Sarah dealt with her diagnosis and how she survived cancer as she shares all the high, lows, tears, and laughter of her journey. This honest and raw account of Sarah’s cancer journey also includes lots of information and top tips on diet, exercise, health, and beauty. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Living with lymphoma. A patient's guide'

Living with lymphoma. A patient's guide (2016)

Johns Hopkins University Press

When neurobiologist Elizabeth M. Adler was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma almost twenty years ago, she learned everything she could about the disease, both to cope with the emotional stress of her diagnosis and to make the best possible decisions for her treatment. In Living with lymphoma, she combines her scientific expertise and personal knowledge with a desire to help other people who have lymphoma manage this complex and often baffling disease. With the availability of more effective treatment regimens, many people with lymphoma are living longer; in fact, there are more than 700,000 lymphoma survivors in the United States alone. Given this change in the lymphoma landscape, the second edition of this book places a greater emphasis on survivorship. The new edition includes the latest information on lymphoma diagnosis, treatment, and incidence and describes the most recent update to the WHO system of lymphoma classification and staging. Adler discusses new targeted therapies like ibrutinib and idelalisib and describes how other treatments, including radiation therapy and stem cell transplants, have been modified while others have been discontinued. She also addresses new developments, such as the possible role of lack of sunlight and vitamin D in the pathogenesis of lymphoma, and the use of medical marijuana. The book includes suggestions for further reading, including the latest material available online. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'What doesn’t kill you, makes you stronger'

What doesn’t kill you, makes you stronger (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

“You’ve got cancer” – three little words that can change your life. “What Doesn’t Kill You, Makes You Stronger” is the honest, straight-from-the-heart account of one woman’s experience of hearing these three words. Right from the start, it follows every step of this journey – and it IS a journey – the tears and laughter, the ups and downs and everything in between. There is loads of information available that give you the facts about what it’s like to be diagnosed with cancer, what happens next, what the options are for treatment and a how to have a life alongside a cancer diagnosis. Most of these are written by those who have never had cancer. Not many of them share the emotional and psychological effects that being diagnosed have. This book does. It talks about the real side effects of chemo, the strange things you crave or can’t stand, the powerful friendships that develop and the fierce spirit within, which is determined to beat cancer. It’s not a “poor me” story……it’s a frank and honest account that has one purpose – to help other people who find themselves with a cancer diagnosis, to show them that what they are thinking and feeling is “OK”, that they aren’t alone and that it’s ok to have a laugh. “What Doesn’t Kill You, Makes You Stronger” – very frank, very honest and very true. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A guide to examining your testicles'

A guide to examining your testicles (2015)

Family Advice and Information Resource

Illustrated booklet aimed at men with learning difficulties. It explains how and when to examine the testicles and what to do if a change is noticed. Includes tips on general health.

Cover image of 'The Royal Marsden cancer cookbook'

The Royal Marsden cancer cookbook (2015)

Kyle Books

The book is divided into three: a detailed section by Clare Shaw about diet and cancer and the problems you may face during treatment (like loss of appetite, nausea, sore mouth, change of taste); recipes to cook during treatment, which are nutritionally beneficial and wholesome enough to keep you strong even if you can’t eat too much; and a section of recipes for after treatment aimed at keeping you healthy. These recipes are designed to serve smaller portions and two people as well as for families, and there are lots of tips about budgeting, leftovers and freezing. Clare and Catherine want to emphasise that you don’t have to cook ‘special’, separate meals for one, the rest of the family can eat in the same way, saving on time and stress as well as encouraging a healthier diet for all. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cooking for chemo...and after!'

Cooking for chemo...and after! (2015)

Callahan Publishing

'Cooking for Chemo ...and After!' is a how-to-cook cookbook that teaches you how to adjust your cooking for someone going through chemotherapy. This cookbook focuses on teaching you how to adjust the flavor of your favorite foods so you can enjoy eating again. It is filled with 90 pages of culinary theory and over 100 pages of recipes that will teach you how to apply what you have learned. It was written by Chef Ryan Callahan based on his first-hand experience acting as primary caregiver for his mother, while she went through chemotherapy. Anybody who has ever been through chemotherapy, acted as a caregiver, or knows someone who has been through chemo will admit that combating and living with the metallic tastes in your mouth is one of the hardest parts. This book specifically addresses this problem and gives you easy, real-life solutions. These solutions can be employed in conjunction with any diet regimen or dietary restriction. 'Cooking for Chemo …and After!' is not a "new fad-diet" cookbook or a “what to eat, what not to eat” nutritional guide. It is a book that teaches you how to think and cook like a chef. It is a book that teaches you how to adjust flavor. It will change the way you cook and see food. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'My cancer journey. A rendezvous with myself'

My cancer journey. A rendezvous with myself (2015)

Balboa Press

My book is a candid narration of my encounter with breast cancer. It is the story of an ordinary woman who was put in extraordinary circumstances, and who undertook her cancer journey with the utmost courage. This memoir is not just about describing a difficult medical condition. It is about going through the experience, and emerging from it wiser and stronger. It is about using cancer as a life changing experience, despite all the trauma and the loss – and the change needn’t be for the worse. It is about understanding the choice that a human being has – the choice to accept what cannot be changed, and to use one of the toughest fights of life to evolve into a better person, irrespective of the prognosis. Pick up a copy to embark on a rendezvous with your inner self! (Author)

Cover image of 'Travels with Cookie. Narrowboat cruising with a cat'

Travels with Cookie. Narrowboat cruising with a cat (2014)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Between 2004 and 2006, David Thomas experienced a series of disasters in his life, culminating in being told that he only had a short time left to live. Rather than sinking into despair as many people would, he decided to fulfil his lifelong dream of living on a canal boat, while he still could. So he bought a narrowboat, LadyRiverMouse (an anagram of 'Live Your Dreams') with a view to spending the rest of his limited life cruising the canals and rivers of England. Naturally, he had to take the love of his life with him – a rather bad-tempered fluffy white prima donna of a cat called Cookie. Cookie was an indoor cat who had rarely been outside, never mind living on a boat, where according to David dogs are usually the pets of choice. Would it work out? David didn't know, but as he put it, “I wasn't going anywhere without my beloved Cookie”. The remainder of the book is an account of the few years David spent travelling through the waterways of his native land. Many people live on boats; few cruise as extensively as David did – to London, along the Thames, up to Wales, then tackling the wild and often desolate rivers of North West England. A beginner to boating when he started, David learned much as time went on, mainly by having numerous – and often hair-raising - adventures. So did Cookie, who contrived to get lost, fall in the water on a number of occasions, and generally use up most of her cat's nine lives. Finally David met Helen, a helicopter instructor, writer, and – most importantly – cat lover. They fell in love, and David's life began to change yet again, leading to the eventual sale of LadyRiverMouse and a new life in the Peak District for David and Cookie. David knows about boating, has an eye for detail, and is also an astute observer of his fellow men and women, both on and off the waterways. Therefore this book will clearly be of interest to those who have ever travelled on the canals or done any other boating, anyone who loves travel of any type, or simply the armchair traveller who enjoys reading about others' adventures. But “Travels With Cookie” is more than just another boating or travel book. It is a tale of bereavement and divorce, of terminal illness and despair, and finally of romance, a seemingly miraculous cure, and a new life. Hence it should appeal to anyone who likes human interest stories of any type. And of course – as Cookie herself would tell you if she could speak - it i

Cover image of 'When I die. Lessons from the death zone'

When I die. Lessons from the death zone (2012)

Little, Brown

On 29 January 2008 Philip Gould was told he had cancer. He was stoical, and set about his treatment, determined to fight his illness. In the face of difficult decisions he sought always to understand the disease and the various medical options open to him, supported by his wife Gail and their two daughters, Georgia and Grace. In 2010, after two hard years of chemotherapy and surgery, the tests came up clear - Philip appeared to have won the battle. But his work as a key strategist for the Labour party took its toll, and feeling ill six months later, he insisted on one extra, precautionary test, which told him that the cancer had returned. Thus began Philip's long, painful but ultimately optimistic journey towards death, during which time he began to appreciate and make sense of his life, his work and his relationships in a way he had never thought possible. He realized something that he had never heard articulated before: death need not be only negative or painful, it can be life-affirming and revelatory. Written during the last few months of his life, When I Die describes the journey Philip took with his illness, leaving to us what he called his lessons from the death zone. This courageous, profoundly moving and inspiring work is as valuable a legacy to the world as anyone could wish to bestow - hugely uplifting, beautifully written with extraordinary insight. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A woman's disease. The history of cervical cancer'

A woman's disease. The history of cervical cancer (2011)

Oxford University Press

Cervical cancer is an emotive disease with multiple connotations. It has stood for the horror of cancer, the curse of femininity, the hope of cutting-edge medical technologies and the promise of screening for malignant tumours. For a long time, this disease was identified with the most dreaded aspects of malignancies: prolonged invalidity and chronic pain, but also physical degradation, shame and social isolation. Cervical cancer displayed in parallel the dangers of being a woman. In the 20th century, innovations initially developed to control cervical cancer - radiotherapy and radium therapy, exfoliate cytology (Pap smear), homogenisation of the 'staging' of tumours, mass campaigns for an early detection of precancerous lesions of the cervix - set standards for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of other malignancies. In the late 20th century, cervical cancer underwent another important change. With the display of the role of selected strands of HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) in the genesis of this malignancy, it was transformed into a sexually transmitted disease. This new understanding of cervical cancer linked it more firmly with lifestyle choices, and thus increased the danger of stigmatisation of patients; on the other hand it opened the possibility for efficient prevention of this malignancy through vaccination. Ilana Lowy follows the disease from antiquity to the 21st century, focussing on the period since the mid-19th century, during which cervical cancer was dissociated from other gynaecological disorders and became a distinct entity. Following the ways in which new developments in science, medicine, and society have affected beliefs about medical progress and an individual's responsibility, gender roles, reproduction, and sex, Lowy demonstrates our understanding of what cervical cancer is, and how it can be prevented and cured. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A guide to examining your breasts'

A guide to examining your breasts (2010)

Family Advice and Information Resource

This illustrated booklet is aimed at women with learning difficulties. It describes why and how to examine the breasts and what to do if a change is noticed. Includes tips on staying healthy.

Cover image of 'Connecting through compassion. Guidance for family and friends of a brain cancer patient'

Connecting through compassion. Guidance for family and friends of a brain cancer patient (2010)

Cancer Lifeline Publications

This book candidly discusses the challenges of living with the personality and behavior changes brain cancer brings, and offers practical tools to make the journey easier. Joni Aldrich and Neysa Peterson have each cared for a spouse with a brain illness. They have combined their insights in this practical, straight-talking guide. Readers will learn: symptoms a brain cancer patient may experience; how to create and maintain a warm, comfortable and safe environment; methods to use if communication becomes an issue; how to deal with changes in personality, behavior, and emotions, including loss of social inhibition skills; how to handle issues related to changes in memory and the resulting confusion; how to work through indifference, sadness, and depression towards some peace; how to cope with self-destructive behavior-safety is your number one concern; how to have end-of-life discussions and fulfil final wishes. When a family member or friend is diagnosed with cancer, life as you know it has ended. Not only must you face the chaos of doctors' visits, exhausting treatments, and sleepless nights, you must try to savor every precious moment with your loved one. When the diagnosis is brain cancer, you must endure all this plus one more challenge: the person you love may look the same, and sound the same-but he or she is not the same. His or her personality may change in extreme ways. A kind and loving person may become angry and say hurtful things. A warm, upbeat person may withdraw or behave in self-destructive ways. The essence of your loved one can disappear, even as he or she continues to live. With the tools in this book, you can continue to love and be loved during this difficult crisis. 'The last weeks of Gordon's life were spent with someone that I barely knew and didn't know how to approach. It took me two years of counseling to get through the scars. It didn't have to be that way for me. And it certainly doesn't have to be that way for you.' Joni Aldrich (Publisher)

Sorry, no publications found.
Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 7 days a week, 8am-8pm