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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 103

Cover image of 'A woman's disease. The history of cervical cancer'

A woman's disease. The history of cervical cancer (2011)

Oxford University Press

Cervical cancer is an emotive disease with multiple connotations. It has stood for the horror of cancer, the curse of femininity, the hope of cutting-edge medical technologies and the promise of screening for malignant tumours. For a long time, this disease was identified with the most dreaded aspects of malignancies: prolonged invalidity and chronic pain, but also physical degradation, shame and social isolation. Cervical cancer displayed in parallel the dangers of being a woman. In the 20th century, innovations initially developed to control cervical cancer - radiotherapy and radium therapy, exfoliate cytology (Pap smear), homogenisation of the 'staging' of tumours, mass campaigns for an early detection of precancerous lesions of the cervix - set standards for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of other malignancies. In the late 20th century, cervical cancer underwent another important change. With the display of the role of selected strands of HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) in the genesis of this malignancy, it was transformed into a sexually transmitted disease. This new understanding of cervical cancer linked it more firmly with lifestyle choices, and thus increased the danger of stigmatisation of patients; on the other hand it opened the possibility for efficient prevention of this malignancy through vaccination. Ilana Lowy follows the disease from antiquity to the 21st century, focussing on the period since the mid-19th century, during which cervical cancer was dissociated from other gynaecological disorders and became a distinct entity. Following the ways in which new developments in science, medicine, and society have affected beliefs about medical progress and an individual's responsibility, gender roles, reproduction, and sex, Lowy demonstrates our understanding of what cervical cancer is, and how it can be prevented and cured. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A guide to examining your breasts'

A guide to examining your breasts (2010)

Family Advice and Information Resource

This illustrated booklet is aimed at women with learning difficulties. It describes why and how to examine the breasts and what to do if a change is noticed. Includes tips on staying healthy.

Cover image of 'Connecting through compassion. Guidance for family and friends of a brain cancer patient'

Connecting through compassion. Guidance for family and friends of a brain cancer patient (2010)

Cancer Lifeline Publications

This book candidly discusses the challenges of living with the personality and behavior changes brain cancer brings, and offers practical tools to make the journey easier. Joni Aldrich and Neysa Peterson have each cared for a spouse with a brain illness. They have combined their insights in this practical, straight-talking guide. Readers will learn: symptoms a brain cancer patient may experience; how to create and maintain a warm, comfortable and safe environment; methods to use if communication becomes an issue; how to deal with changes in personality, behavior, and emotions, including loss of social inhibition skills; how to handle issues related to changes in memory and the resulting confusion; how to work through indifference, sadness, and depression towards some peace; how to cope with self-destructive behavior-safety is your number one concern; how to have end-of-life discussions and fulfil final wishes. When a family member or friend is diagnosed with cancer, life as you know it has ended. Not only must you face the chaos of doctors' visits, exhausting treatments, and sleepless nights, you must try to savor every precious moment with your loved one. When the diagnosis is brain cancer, you must endure all this plus one more challenge: the person you love may look the same, and sound the same-but he or she is not the same. His or her personality may change in extreme ways. A kind and loving person may become angry and say hurtful things. A warm, upbeat person may withdraw or behave in self-destructive ways. The essence of your loved one can disappear, even as he or she continues to live. With the tools in this book, you can continue to love and be loved during this difficult crisis. 'The last weeks of Gordon's life were spent with someone that I barely knew and didn't know how to approach. It took me two years of counseling to get through the scars. It didn't have to be that way for me. And it certainly doesn't have to be that way for you.' Joni Aldrich (Publisher)

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