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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 16

Cover image of 'My brother or sister has cancer. A children's guide to coping with cancer'

My brother or sister has cancer. A children's guide to coping with cancer (May 2020)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This illustrated booklet tells the story of siblings Tom and Jess, whose little brother Ben has cancer. It describes how they cope with the illness and the changes it brings. It is aimed at children under nine.

Cover image of 'A parent's guide to neuroblastoma. Information and support for when your child is diagnosed with a type of cancer called neuroblastoma'

A parent's guide to neuroblastoma. Information and support for when your child is diagnosed with a type of cancer called neuroblastoma (September 2020)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group|Neuroblastoma UK

This booklet is for parents and carers of a child who has been diagnosed with neuroblastoma. We hope it answers some of your questions and helps you to cope with some of the feelings you may have. There is information about neuroblastoma, the treatments that are used and their possible side effects. It also discusses how a cancer diagnosis can affect you, your child and the rest of the family.

Cover image of 'When your brother or sister has cancer. An information guide for teenagers and young adults whose sibling is diagnosed with cancer'

When your brother or sister has cancer. An information guide for teenagers and young adults whose sibling is diagnosed with cancer (November 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Being told that your brother or sister has cancer can be overwhelming and you may be full of questions. It is a difficult time for everyone in your family as life is turned upside down almost overnight. You will likely feel many different emotions as you try and come to terms with what your sibling’s diagnosis means for you and your family. You may feel worried or upset at this sudden change that you didn’t want or ask for, and you may desperately want everything to go back to normal as it was before their diagnosis. Life can seem very unfair. These feelings are completely normal and you are not alone. This guide covers how your brother or sister’s diagnosis might affect you, your feelings and emotions, and how it is important to take care of yourself during this difficult time. It explains more about cancer, and what you can expect over the coming weeks and months.

Cover image of 'Supporting your pupil after a cancer diagnosis. An information guide for teachers helping children and young
people returning to school after a diagnosis of cancer'

Supporting your pupil after a cancer diagnosis. An information guide for teachers helping children and young people returning to school after a diagnosis of cancer (December 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Getting back to school is vital for children with cancer. School helps them to feel ‘normal’ and reduces the isolation and loneliness which many children with cancer face. Teachers have a really important role to play in encouraging the child’s integration back into a school routine. But cancer is a scary word for many and it is completely normal for teachers and others working at the school to feel upset – not just for the awful situation facing the pupil and their family, but also for the impact on the rest of the class and school community. This guide aims to lessen some of the worries you may have by giving simple practical information and advice on a variety of issues faced by the child and their family, and some ideas on how to help them within a school setting.

Cover image of 'Beyond'

Beyond (2019)

Burning Chair

What happens when we die? Is this really all there is? What exists beyond this life? Alex Duncan is just an ordinary 14 year old boy. His main worries are homework, girls, the school bully......and his sister, Jenna who has ovarian cancer, stage B. As his parents retreat into themselves, Alex is desperate to find a way to help, a way to make things better for his sister. After all, it’s the not knowing that’s the worst thing. Whilst he tries to untangle the ultimate question, life still goes on: his best friend seems oblivious to his feelings about her, the school bully has taken a special interest in him, and everything he does just makes him feel more and more awkward and out of place. Georgia Springate’s debut novel, Beyond, is a funny and touchingly compelling coming-of-age story about love, loss and discovery. Read it and take an emotional journey through one boy’s quest to understand that most tricky of questions: what lies beyond? (Publishers)

Cover image of 'Echo's sister'

Echo's sister (2018)

HarperCollins

Twelve-year-old El has planned on making her first week at a new school fantastic. She won’t go by her given name, Laughter. She’ll sit in the back of the classroom where she can make new friends. She won’t even have time to think about all the fun her old friends are having without her. Everything will be great. But when her dad picks her up after school and tells her that her younger sister, Echo, has a life-threatening illness, her world is suddenly turned upside down. And with her parents now pressed for time and money, El feels lost and powerless. Then she befriends Octavius, the only other kid in school who gets what she’s going through. As El begins to adjust to her new life, she soon finds that maybe a little hope and a lot of love can overcome any obstacle. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'Never too young to grieve. Supporting children under 5 after the death of a parent'

Never too young to grieve. Supporting children under 5 after the death of a parent (2018)

Winston's Wish

A child’s early years are a time of development and change which helps shape the rest of their life. From newborn babies needing constant attention and care to curious children seeking new experiences, an immense amount of learning and change happen during this short period of time. A key focus of early childhood is the relationships that children form with the important people in their lives — usually parents, carers and siblings. Most children will form a strong, secure bond with these people, which enables them to feel safe, and encourages the curiosity that helps them to explore their world. Bereavement during a child’s early years interrupts the attachment that they have with that person. In the absence of strong memories of their own, it can be hard for a young child to remember the person who has died and to feel connected to them. This booklet is designed for parents, carers, childcare professionals and other adults supporting children up to the age of 5 who have experienced the death of a parent or carer. It offers information and ideas as well as some activities which we hope will benefit children and their families. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Having a sibling stem cell transplant'

Having a sibling stem cell transplant (January 2017)

Anthony Nolan

A brief guide to a type of stem cell or bone marrow transplant called a sibling transplant. It describes who can have this type of transplant, how it works, the possible side effects and where to go for further information and support.

Cover image of 'When your child’s cancer comes back or does not respond to initial treatment. Information for parents and families of a child or young person with relapsed or refractory cancer'

When your child’s cancer comes back or does not respond to initial treatment. Information for parents and families of a child or young person with relapsed or refractory cancer (October 2017)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Being told your child’s cancer has come back or hasn’t gone away can come as a huge shock, bringing back many emotions from your child’s first diagnosis. This booklet acknowledges these feelings and gives information to help you cope with the experience once again. 

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