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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 38

Cover image of 'A parent's guide to neuroblastoma. Information and support for when your child is diagnosed with a type of cancer called neuroblastoma'

A parent's guide to neuroblastoma. Information and support for when your child is diagnosed with a type of cancer called neuroblastoma (September 2020)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group|Neuroblastoma UK

This booklet is for parents and carers of a child who has been diagnosed with neuroblastoma. We hope it answers some of your questions and helps you to cope with some of the feelings you may have. There is information about neuroblastoma, the treatments that are used and their possible side effects. It also discusses how a cancer diagnosis can affect you, your child and the rest of the family.

Cover image of 'Help with the cost of cancer in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland'

Help with the cost of cancer in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland (March 2020)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about getting benefits and other financial help if you are affected by cancer in England, Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland. It is for anyone living with cancer and their family, friends and carers. It explains the types of financial help you could get and how to claim this support. It also tells you who to contact for further help, including Macmillan’s welfare rights advisers.

Cover image of 'I have finished my treatment. What happens next'

I have finished my treatment. What happens next (November 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This booklet for children and teenagers aged 10-16 aims to help answer questions and concerns that arise when treatment for cancer finishes. It covers feelings and emotions, coping with worry, coping with family and friends, school and college, healthy living, and practical issues such as what happens at follow-up, medicines, and what to look out for.

Cover image of 'When your brother or sister has cancer. An information guide for teenagers and young adults whose sibling is diagnosed with cancer'

When your brother or sister has cancer. An information guide for teenagers and young adults whose sibling is diagnosed with cancer (November 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Being told that your brother or sister has cancer can be overwhelming and you may be full of questions. It is a difficult time for everyone in your family as life is turned upside down almost overnight. You will likely feel many different emotions as you try and come to terms with what your sibling’s diagnosis means for you and your family. You may feel worried or upset at this sudden change that you didn’t want or ask for, and you may desperately want everything to go back to normal as it was before their diagnosis. Life can seem very unfair. These feelings are completely normal and you are not alone. This guide covers how your brother or sister’s diagnosis might affect you, your feelings and emotions, and how it is important to take care of yourself during this difficult time. It explains more about cancer, and what you can expect over the coming weeks and months.

Cover image of 'Supporting your pupil after a cancer diagnosis. An information guide for teachers helping children and young
people returning to school after a diagnosis of cancer'

Supporting your pupil after a cancer diagnosis. An information guide for teachers helping children and young people returning to school after a diagnosis of cancer (December 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Getting back to school is vital for children with cancer. School helps them to feel ‘normal’ and reduces the isolation and loneliness which many children with cancer face. Teachers have a really important role to play in encouraging the child’s integration back into a school routine. But cancer is a scary word for many and it is completely normal for teachers and others working at the school to feel upset – not just for the awful situation facing the pupil and their family, but also for the impact on the rest of the class and school community. This guide aims to lessen some of the worries you may have by giving simple practical information and advice on a variety of issues faced by the child and their family, and some ideas on how to help them within a school setting.

Cover image of 'Returning to school. A teacher's guide for pupils with a brain tumour, during and after treatment'

Returning to school. A teacher's guide for pupils with a brain tumour, during and after treatment (2019)

The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust|Cerebra

This publication aims to guide teachers and schools faced with the task of supporting a pupil with a brain or spinal tumour who may be absent for some time, or who may have sporadic attendance with a very serious illness and potentially devastating long term effects. It explains what the pupil may be going through both medically and psychologically. It offers practical strategies for ensuring supportive re-integration back to school. Suggestions are given for how teachers, assistants and SENCOs can provide sustained and targeted support for pupils who face extended treatments, devastating long term side effects or an uncertain future.

Cover image of 'HPV vaccination. Protecting against HPV infection to help reduce your risk of cancer'

HPV vaccination. Protecting against HPV infection to help reduce your risk of cancer (June 2019)

Public Health England

The HPV vaccine has been offered to all girls in school year 8 for over ten years. From September 2019, the vaccine will also be offered to year 8 boys. This leaflet explains why it is given, how HPV spreads, and the impact of the vaccine to date.

Cover image of 'Beyond'

Beyond (2019)

Burning Chair

What happens when we die? Is this really all there is? What exists beyond this life? Alex Duncan is just an ordinary 14 year old boy. His main worries are homework, girls, the school bully......and his sister, Jenna who has ovarian cancer, stage B. As his parents retreat into themselves, Alex is desperate to find a way to help, a way to make things better for his sister. After all, it’s the not knowing that’s the worst thing. Whilst he tries to untangle the ultimate question, life still goes on: his best friend seems oblivious to his feelings about her, the school bully has taken a special interest in him, and everything he does just makes him feel more and more awkward and out of place. Georgia Springate’s debut novel, Beyond, is a funny and touchingly compelling coming-of-age story about love, loss and discovery. Read it and take an emotional journey through one boy’s quest to understand that most tricky of questions: what lies beyond? (Publishers)

Cover image of 'Honest answers, sound advice: a young person's guide to cancer'

Honest answers, sound advice: a young person's guide to cancer (2018)

Teenage Cancer Trust

Comprehensive information for young people with cancer.

Cover image of 'Talking with your children about breast cancer'

Talking with your children about breast cancer (June 2018)

Breast Cancer Care

This booklet explains what children of different ages can understand about a serious illness such as cancer and how they may respond to the news that someone in the family has breast cancer. Individual parents describe their experiences and the booklet has advice on what, when and how to tell children about the diagnosis.

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