Publications directory

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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 402

Cover image of 'Sore mouth or gut (mucositis)'

Sore mouth or gut (mucositis) (December 2019)

Blood Cancer UK

Mucositis is a condition that affects your mucous membrane, the thin skin that covers and protects the inside surface of parts of your body. It can be a painful side effect of chemotherapy or radiotherapy. This factsheet explains how it is caused and who gets it, and describes the signs and symptoms, and how to look after yourself.

Cover image of 'Letrozole'

Letrozole (February 2019)

Breast Cancer Care

This leaflet describes what letrozole (Femara®) is, how it works, when it may be prescribed, how it is taken, and the possible side-effects.

Cover image of 'Financial support - benefits [Chinese, Traditional]'

Financial support - benefits [Chinese, Traditional] (March 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This factsheet is about claiming benefits. Includes the English-language version.. 

Cover image of 'Radiotherapy for advanced prostate cancer'

Radiotherapy for advanced prostate cancer (March 2019)

Prostate Cancer UK

This factsheet is for men with advanced prostate cancer who would like to know more about treatment with palliative radiotherapy. It explains who can have palliative radiotherapy, how it treats advanced prostate cancer and the advantages and disadvantages. It covers external beam radiotherapy and internal radiotherapy (radioisotopes), describing what the treatment involves and the side effects. It does not cover the treatment of localised or locally-advanced prostate cancer.

Cover image of 'Exemestane'

Exemestane (February 2019)

Breast Cancer Care

This booklet explains what exemestane is, how it works, when it may be prescribed and possible side effects. 

Cover image of 'Radiotherapy for primary breast cancer'

Radiotherapy for primary breast cancer (May 2019)

Breast Cancer Care

This booklet describes radiotherapy for primary (early) breast cancer. It explains what radiotherapy is, why it might be needed, how it is given, what to expect, treatment planning, and the possible side-effects. 

Cover image of 'Dry, sore and itchy skin'

Dry, sore and itchy skin (June 2019)

Lymphoma Action

Skin problems can be a symptom of lymphoma. They can also be a side effect of some treatments. This factsheet has suggestions to help you manage dry, sore and itchy skin. Contents: Skin problems as a symptom of lymphoma; Skin problems as a side effect of treatment; Managing sore, dry and itchy skin.

Cover image of 'Being cared for at home'

Being cared for at home (July 2019)

Marie Curie

This booklet is for people living with a terminal illness, and their family and friends. Inside you’ll find information about the care and support that’s available for you at home. 

Cover image of 'I have finished my treatment. What happens next'

I have finished my treatment. What happens next (November 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This booklet for children and teenagers aged 10-16 aims to help answer questions and concerns that arise when treatment for cancer finishes. It covers feelings and emotions, coping with worry, coping with family and friends, school and college, healthy living, and practical issues such as what happens at follow-up, medicines, and what to look out for.

Cover image of 'When your brother or sister has cancer. An information guide for teenagers and young adults whose sibling is diagnosed with cancer'

When your brother or sister has cancer. An information guide for teenagers and young adults whose sibling is diagnosed with cancer (November 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Being told that your brother or sister has cancer can be overwhelming and you may be full of questions. It is a difficult time for everyone in your family as life is turned upside down almost overnight. You will likely feel many different emotions as you try and come to terms with what your sibling’s diagnosis means for you and your family. You may feel worried or upset at this sudden change that you didn’t want or ask for, and you may desperately want everything to go back to normal as it was before their diagnosis. Life can seem very unfair. These feelings are completely normal and you are not alone. This guide covers how your brother or sister’s diagnosis might affect you, your feelings and emotions, and how it is important to take care of yourself during this difficult time. It explains more about cancer, and what you can expect over the coming weeks and months.

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