We understand that people with cancer are worried about coronavirus. Here is the latest guidance. We will update it regularly.

Publications directory

Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 7 days a week, 8am-8pm

The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 12

Cover image of 'Behaviour and personality change. A resource to help you understand and manage behaviour and personality change when living with a brain tumour'

Behaviour and personality change. A resource to help you understand and manage behaviour and personality change when living with a brain tumour (January 2020)

Brainstrust

Up 60% of people diagnosed with a brain tumour experience behaviour and personality changes (BPC). This booklet covers: understanding BPC; what we mean by BPC; causes; symptoms; how BPC is manifested; how it is measured; mood journals; strategies to help people cope; and treatment options and self-help strategies. It also has information for carers, details of who can help, and questions to ask.

Cover image of 'Complementary therapy'

Complementary therapy (June 2019)

Lymphoma Action

This factsheet describes complementary therapies and how they may be used in lymphoma. It has brief information about the different types (acupuncture, aromatherapy, art therapy, chiropractic care, massage, mindfulness, music therapy, tai chi and yoga), and also looks at choosing a complementary therapy, finding a practitioner, the availability of complementary therapy and regulation.

Cover image of 'Relaxation techniques. Evidence-based information to help you self-manage your cancer experience'

Relaxation techniques. Evidence-based information to help you self-manage your cancer experience (2019)

Penny Brohn UK

This evidence-based information sheet aims to provide clearly sourced and reliable information to help you make informed choices about the range of relaxation techniques on offer to support people with cancer. 

Cover image of 'Your feelings after cancer treatment'

Your feelings after cancer treatment (January 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is for people who have had cancer treatment. You may also find it helpful if you are having ongoing treatment to control cancer or prevent it returning. It describes some of the feelings you may have and suggests ways to cope with them. 

Cover image of 'The cancer roller coaster. How to manage the emotional and mental impact'

The cancer roller coaster. How to manage the emotional and mental impact (2019)

Librotas

Two days after celebrating her 50th birthday, Juliette Chan had an unexpected birthday present: bowel cancer. Luckily, they caught it early, but once the treatment was over, the psychological side-effects surfaced. For many months, Juliette was adrift and felt lost. It seemed that everything in her life was up for review and she struggled to gain clarity about what to do next. There were many questions, such as: When will I feel normal again; Why am I not as motivated as before; Will the cancer come back; Why am I mentally exhausted. It took her a while to realise that the cancer had caused a whole load of losses: loss of trust in her body, self-image as a fit and healthy person, energy, confidence, motivation, income and much more. And that’s when the penny dropped; she was grieving. Cancer not only involves coping with the physical disease and treatment – it also means experiencing and dealing with hidden losses that will affect how you view and live your life. Every time you experience a loss, there is an emotional response: grief. Most people only associate grief with bereavement but it is in fact a natural reaction to any and all losses, including the hidden and intangible losses you face with cancer. Anyone who has or has had cancer, as well as their family and friends, will experience grief – because life has changed. This can show up as anger, frustration, anxiety, ‘depression’, fear, sadness, for example. If left unchecked or suppressed, grief will affect your mental health and emotional wellbeing. It doesn’t have to be like this; it is possible to take care of the emotional and mental impact of cancer and to live well. In her easy, relaxed style of writing, Juliette explains the emotional and mental impact of cancer and highlights the limitations of Mindfulness and positive thinking. She has also included a workbook with simple practical exercises that help to release the psychological side-effects and provide clarity. You can also read the candid stories of eight others who faced cancer: Robert describes his initial feelings of shock on diagnosis and how others helped him to cope, whereas Meena recounts going it alone; Petra shares how she continued to run throughout her treatment, and Susan talks movingly about the seemingly endless decision-making from diagnosis onwards; Mary, Tony and June recount their unique experiences of the same cancer

Cover image of 'Complementary therapies, relaxation and wellbeing'

Complementary therapies, relaxation and wellbeing (February 2018)

Breast Cancer Care

This booklet is about relaxation and wellbeing during and after breast cancer treatment. It looks at complementary therapies such as acupuncture, Reiki and massage. It also describes some popular relaxation techniques, including meditation and mindfulness, and has information on yoga, Thai Chi and Chi Gung. It discusses why people might use these complementary therapies and relaxation techniques after a diagnosis of breast cancer, and what they may need to think about before trying them. It also explains what herbal medicines and homeopathy are. 

Cover image of 'My fatigue book. A resource to help you understand, manage and own fatigue'

My fatigue book. A resource to help you understand, manage and own fatigue (September 2017)

Brainstrust

This resource aims to enable patients and caregivers living with a brain tumour to understand what is meant by fatigue and to self-manage fatigue relating to brain tumours so that they: learn a new pace of living; take steps to mitigate the impact of fatigue; and make the most of what they can do, rather than what they can’t.

Cover image of 'Laughing at cancer. How to heal with love, laughter and mindfulness'

Laughing at cancer. How to heal with love, laughter and mindfulness (2017)

Brolga Publishing Pty

Laughing at cancer is a unique book based on a series of journals following the author's shock diagnosis of bowel cancer at 43. Brimming with humour, insight and sensitivity, it explores how we talk about and view illness, and how changing your mindset can do wonders on the journey to health. Through explanations of mindful healing techniques and the power of laughter, Laughing at cancer is both a touching memoir and powerful healing guide for anyone undergoing a significant health or life challenge, and not specifically cancer. Wellbeing and mindfulness healing techniques at the conclusion of each chapter empower readers and provide strategies to enhance resilience - a factor often diminished by ill health. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Well. A doctor's journey through fear to freedom'

Well. A doctor's journey through fear to freedom (2017)

Saraband

When Dr Mary Gunn was diagnosed with cancer, her first reaction was fear, and to fight the disease aggressively for the sake of not only herself but her young children and husband. But when it came back – and turned out to be incurable – she knew that she couldn’t live the rest of her life in fear. Mary embraced a new approach to life: to accept all the joy and sorrow, safety and danger, certainty and unpredictability… in essence, to live freely. In our uncertain times, when it’s difficult not to feel the fear, Dr Mary Gunn’s remarkable memoir offers mindfulness tools for resilience, and shows how we can all use acceptance, compassion and love to live courageously, magnificently. Backed up by many years of experience as both a doctor and a patient, her story will inspire you to let go of fear, love life and live well. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'How to live well with chronic pain and illness'

How to live well with chronic pain and illness (2015)

Wisdom Publications

Comfort, understanding, and advice for those who are suffering--and those who care for them. Chronic illness creates many challenges, from career crises and relationship issues to struggles with self-blame, personal identity, and isolation. Toni Bernhard addresses these challenges and many more, using practical examples to illustrate how mindfulness, equanimity, and compassion can help readers make peace with a life turned upside down. In her characteristic conversational style, Bernhard shows how to cope and make the most of life despite the challenges of chronic illness. Benefit from: Mindfulness exercises to mitigate physical and emotional pain Concrete advice for negotiating the everyday hurdles of medical appointments, household chores, and social obligations Tools for navigating the strains illness can place on relationships Several chapters are directed toward family and friends of the chronically ill, helping them to understand what their loved one is going through and how they can help. Humorous and empathetic, Bernhard shares her own struggles and setbacks with unflinching honesty, offering invaluable support in the search to find peace and well-being. (Publisher)

Sorry, no publications found.
Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 7 days a week, 8am-8pm