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Publications directory

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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 12

Cover image of 'Relaxation techniques. Evidence-based information to help you self-manage your cancer experience'

Relaxation techniques. Evidence-based information to help you self-manage your cancer experience (2019)

Penny Brohn UK

This evidence-based information sheet aims to provide clearly sourced and reliable information to help you make informed choices about the range of relaxation techniques on offer to support people with cancer. 

Cover image of 'Your feelings after cancer treatment'

Your feelings after cancer treatment (January 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is for people who have had cancer treatment. You may also find it helpful if you are having ongoing treatment to control cancer or prevent it returning. It describes some of the feelings you may have and suggests ways to cope with them. 

Cover image of 'Cancer and complementary therapies'

Cancer and complementary therapies (October 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet describes the complementary therapies most often used for people with cancer and gives an idea of what is involved in each therapy. Includes details of useful organisations and other resources.

Cover image of 'Complementary therapies, relaxation and wellbeing'

Complementary therapies, relaxation and wellbeing (February 2018)

Breast Cancer Care

This booklet is about relaxation and wellbeing during and after breast cancer treatment. It looks at complementary therapies such as acupuncture, Reiki and massage. It also describes some popular relaxation techniques, including meditation and mindfulness, and has information on yoga, Thai Chi and Chi Gung. It discusses why people might use these complementary therapies and relaxation techniques after a diagnosis of breast cancer, and what they may need to think about before trying them. It also explains what herbal medicines and homeopathy are. 

Cover image of 'All the time we thought we had'

All the time we thought we had (2018)

Polygon (Birlinn Imprint)

How do you start a new life when the person you love is about to die? At the age of thirty-six, Gordon Darroch's wife was diagnosed with breast cancer. It was a devastating blow just as he, and their two children with autism, were preparing to move to her native Holland. Eighteen months later, as their plans seemed to be back on course, came the second blow: Magteld was terminally ill and possibly had only a few months to live. As her health rapidly deteriorated, they became caught up in a race against time to get a dying mother home and give their children a future in a country they hardly knew. How could they build a new life in the midst of grief and loss? How would their two sons adjust to such enormous changes? And what would remain of Magteld once she was gone? All the Time We Thought We Had is a story of love and loss and a meditation on grief and memory. It's about how events shape our lives and how we cope with them. And it raises important questions about what we value in life and the legacies we leave behind. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Not that kind of love. A sister, a brother, some tumours and a cat'

Not that kind of love. A sister, a brother, some tumours and a cat (2018)

Quercus

A moving, thought-provoking and surprisingly humorous book which is both a description of a journey to death and a celebration of the act of living. Based on Clare Wise's blog, which she started when she was first diagnosed with cancer in 2013, Not That Kind of Love charts the highs and lows of the last three years of Clare's life. The end result is not a book that fills you with despair and anguish. On the contrary, Not That Kind of Love should be read by everybody for its candour, and for its warmth and spirit. Clare is an astonishingly dynamic, witty and fun personality, and her positivity and energy exude from every page. As she becomes too weak to type, her brother - the actor Greg Wise - takes over, and the book morphs into a beautiful meditation on life, and the necessity of talking about death. With echoes of Atul Gawande's Being Mortal and Cathy Rentzenbrink's The Last Act of Love, it is a very special read that rejoices in the extraordinary and often underestimated sibling bond, and the importance of making the most of the ordinary pleasures life has to offer. As Greg Wise writes in the book: 'Celebrate the small things, the small moments. If you find yourself with matching socks as you leave the house in the morning, that is a cause for celebration. If the rest of the day is spent finding the cure for cancer, or brokering world peace, then that's a bonus.' (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'How to live well with chronic pain and illness'

How to live well with chronic pain and illness (2015)

Wisdom Publications

Comfort, understanding, and advice for those who are suffering--and those who care for them. Chronic illness creates many challenges, from career crises and relationship issues to struggles with self-blame, personal identity, and isolation. Toni Bernhard addresses these challenges and many more, using practical examples to illustrate how mindfulness, equanimity, and compassion can help readers make peace with a life turned upside down. In her characteristic conversational style, Bernhard shows how to cope and make the most of life despite the challenges of chronic illness. Benefit from: Mindfulness exercises to mitigate physical and emotional pain Concrete advice for negotiating the everyday hurdles of medical appointments, household chores, and social obligations Tools for navigating the strains illness can place on relationships Several chapters are directed toward family and friends of the chronically ill, helping them to understand what their loved one is going through and how they can help. Humorous and empathetic, Bernhard shares her own struggles and setbacks with unflinching honesty, offering invaluable support in the search to find peace and well-being. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Dancing with cancer (and how I learnt a few new steps)'

Dancing with cancer (and how I learnt a few new steps) (2014)

O-Books (John Hunt Publishing)

The late Diana Brueton had never been ill and on being diagnosed with metastatic bowel cancer in August 2007 she stepped into a parallel world of waiting rooms, treatments, friends and family who supported - or fled - as life became both exquisitely precious and terrible. Dancing with Cancer is a human drama, a ride on the rollercoaster of hope and despair and, as the gradients became gentler, a journey through meditation and creativity to wisdom and acceptance. Diana was a gifted writer and artist who worked for the BBC, The Bristol Cancer Help Centre and as a teacher and art therapist. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'POG. Weathering the storm'

POG. Weathering the storm (2014)

Mereo Books

When Samantha received the devastating news that she had a cancer that was difficult to treat - in fact, the treatment itself might be fatal - she had to make some difficult choices about how to try and survive. Her story is full of pain, laughter and hope. Surrounded by her young children and supported by her husband, stepson, close family and friends, Samantha was able to overcome her illness through a mixture of conventional and unconventional treatments, some large leaps of faith and some very fortunate timing. She believes that with a combination of meditation and Eastern medicines she was able to put off further chemotherapies until Western science procured an answer. POG is a big thank-you letter to those who helped her on her journey. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Gift of time'

Gift of time (2013)

Constable

An heartbreakingly honest and deeply moving memoir in the words of the son, his wife and his mother of her battle with cancer, from one of the UK's best loved travel writers. When his mother Joan was diagnosed with terminal cancer, Rory MacLean and his wife Katrin took her into their home. For five months, as their life fragmented and turned inward, they fought both to resist and to accept the inevitable. Each gave vent to their emotions in different ways, but all three kept a diary. Heartbreakingly honest and deeply moving, Gift of Time is the story of those days, in the words of a son, his wife and his mother. Woven together into a poignant meditation on life and death, they illuminate the courage and dignity of one woman who confronted what we all must face. Threaded through with wisdom and guilt, anger and acceptance, the story is punctuated by a family wedding and the hope of new life, by bin-bags of old letters and books rediscovered, by the end of winter and the first signs of spring. Powerful, raw and urgent, this slender volume is above all a celebration of life. Capturing every moment of beauty and pain it acknowledges that what survives all of us is love. (Publisher)

Sorry, no publications found.
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