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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 33

Cover image of 'Understanding stem cell transplants using your own cells (autologous)'

Understanding stem cell transplants using your own cells (autologous) (January 2020)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about having a stem cell transplant using your own cells. It is for anyone who is going to have this treatment and there is also information for carers, family members and friends. The booklet explains what an autologous stem cell transplant is, the different stages of treatment, and the possible side effects. It also has information about emotional, practical and financial issues. 

Cover image of 'Autologous stem cell transplant'

Autologous stem cell transplant (November 2019)

Lymphoma Action

This booklet describes autologous stem cell transplant in detail. 

Cover image of 'Understanding testicular cancer'

Understanding testicular cancer (August 2018)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet explains what testicular cancer is, the symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and surgery. It also has sections on sexuality and fertility (including sperm storage), emotions, self-help and support. Includes details of useful organisations.

Cover image of 'Myeloma XII (ACCoRd)'

Myeloma XII (ACCoRd) (September 2017)

Myeloma UK

This factsheet provides information about the Myeloma XII clinical trial (to see if using a novel drug called ixazomib can strengthen the effect of the second HDT-SCT), what is involved if patients decide to take part in the trial, and the advantages and disadvantages of taking part. The purpose of the Myeloma XII trial is to see if using a novel drug called ixazomib can strengthen the effect of the second HDT-SCT.

Cover image of 'BEAM chemotherapy [Punjabi]'

BEAM chemotherapy [Punjabi] (November 2017)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This information from the Macmillan Cancer Support website has been translated into Punjabi. BEAM is a combination chemotherapy treatment used to treat Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. It is given before a stem cell transplant. It may also be used to treat other cancers. This factsheet describes what it is, how it is given, and possible side effects.

Cover image of 'Allogeneic stem cell transplants. A guide for patients'

Allogeneic stem cell transplants. A guide for patients (January 2020)

Leukaemia Care

This booklet explains what an allogeneic stem cell transplant is and who receives one. It describes the procedure and what happens on transplant day, the side effects, graft-versus-host dsease, and what happens if the transplant doesn’t work. It also has a glossary and details of useful contacts and further support.

Cover image of 'Understanding stem cell transplants using donor cells (allogeneic)'

Understanding stem cell transplants using donor cells (allogeneic) (January 2020)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is for anyone who is going to have a donor stem cell transplant.There is also information for carers, family members and friends. The booklet explains what a donor stem cell transplant is, the different stages of treatment, and the possible side effects. It also has information about emotional, practical and financial issues. 

Cover image of 'Helping your child through their stem cell transplant'

Helping your child through their stem cell transplant (August 2020)

Anthony Nolan

This booklet is for anyone with a child who needs a stem cell transplant (sometimes also called a bone marrow transplant). It will help you understand why they need one, what will happen to them and how to look after them as they recover. It will also help you answer any questions your child might have about what they’re going through. It is a supplement to our children’s activity books: Going to hospital for my stem cell transplant; Having my stem cell transplant; and Coming home after my stem cell transplant. 

Cover image of 'Going back to work after your stem cell transplant'

Going back to work after your stem cell transplant (September 2020)

Anthony Nolan

Returning to work after a stem cell transplant can be an important milestone on the road to recovery. For many people, work can help them get back into their everyday life and give them different focus away from the medical world of a transplant. But returning to work isn’t always straightforward. After a transplant, you’ll be recovering physically and emotionally from major treatment. You may need to make adjustments to the way you work, and take things gradually. For some people, going back to work isn’t always possible. We’ve put together this booklet to help you prepare for and manage work after a transplant. It might also be useful if you’re a carer, family member or supporter 

Cover image of 'Having a matched unrelated donor (MUD) stem cell transplant'

Having a matched unrelated donor (MUD) stem cell transplant (June 2020)

Anthony Nolan

A brief guide to a type of stem cell or bone marrow transplant called a matched unrelated donor or MUD transplant. It describes who can have this type of transplant, how it works, the possible side effects and where to find further information and support.

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