Publications directory

Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 7 days a week, 8am-8pm

The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 371

Cover image of 'Heart health and cancer treatment'

Heart health and cancer treatment (February 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support and British Heart Foundation

Some people affected by cancer have problems with their heart health. This is because some cancer treatments can affect the heart. Problems can also arise if you already have a heart condition when you’re diagnosed with cancer. This booklet is for you if: you’ve been told that your cancer treatment may affect your heart; you have a heart condition and need cancer treatment; you’d like to find out how you can improve the health of your heart before, during and after cancer treatment.

Cover image of 'The man manual. Men's health made easy'

The man manual. Men's health made easy (February 2019)

Haynes Publishing for Men's Health Forum

One careful owner? With a little care, the high-performance machine that is the male body will run smoothly for a lifetime with just basic maintenance and minimal need for spare parts. The new fully-revised 2019 edition of this easy-to-read handbook will show you how to fine tune your engine, choose the right fuel and keep your mind on the road ahead. There are also brand new interviews with men who've been on the journey and have a tale to tell. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Late effects of lymphoma treatment'

Late effects of lymphoma treatment (May 2019)

Lymphoma Action

Late effects are health problems that may develop months or years after treatment for lymphoma. This factsheet explains some of the potential late effects of lymphoma treatment, and who might get them. It covers second cancers, heart disease, lung problems, hormone problems and how to reduce your risk.

Cover image of 'Move more. Your guide to becoming more active'

Move more. Your guide to becoming more active (January 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

Taking part in physical activity before, during and after cancer treatment can have many health benefits. It can help prevent and manage some of the effects of treatment, such as fatigue, depression and risks to your heart health. Lots of people say physical activity helps them feel more like they did before cancer. It can also help you take back control. This is your step-by-step guide to becoming more active. Here you will find tips on choosing which activity to do and where to get support. If you have not been active for a while or are new to being active, this guide will help you set realistic and achievable goals. We have included some tips to help you get started, information on how to set goals and an activity diary to help you keep track of how you are doing.

Cover image of 'Common side effects of treatment. A guide for patients'

Common side effects of treatment. A guide for patients (October 2018)

Leukaemia Care

Cancer treatment can cause side-effects and sometimes these can be more difficult to manage than the illness itself. Some of these are common and experienced by many, some are much rarer and occur in very few patients. This booklet is designed to provide you with information about the common side-effects you may experience, what to expect and how they may be managed. It covers the following side effects: increased chance of infection; fatigue; hair loss; anaemia; gastrointestinal side-effects (nausea and vomiting, appetitie changes, constipation, diarrhoea); mouth changes; cognitive effects; pain and tingling; fertility; cardiac and lung toxicity; and secondary cancer risk. It also includes a glossary and details of useful contacts and further support.

Cover image of 'Heart. The health of your heart after childhood cancer treatment'

Heart. The health of your heart after childhood cancer treatment (January 2016)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This factsheet is about the health of your heart after treatment for childhood cancer. Written to accompany the CCLG booklet "Aftercure: A guide for teenage and young adult survivors of childhood cancer".

Cover image of 'Coping with the psychological effects of illness. Strategies to manage anxiety and depression'

Coping with the psychological effects of illness. Strategies to manage anxiety and depression (2015)

Sheldon Press

Sudden, severe ill health comes as a shock and presents several challenges, most notably, loss of confidence. Suddenly people are afraid to take exercise, have sex or even go to the shops. Their entire self-image takes a battering, and this roller-coaster of uncertainty often leads to anxiety and depression. This book looks at the learning curve involved in sudden and chronic illness, and explores key ways to build psychological resilience during this time of challenge. Whether it concerns cancer, heart disease, diabetes, or a mental health condition, it explores the common psychological issues that arise when someone’s usual health and routine are disrupted, and discusses the impact of illness on relationships and family. Drawing on CBT techniques, it offers practical self-help strategies to help deal with peoples changed expectations of themselves, and with the related lifestyle changes. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cook for your life: delicious, nourishing recipes for before, during, and after cancer treatment'

Cook for your life: delicious, nourishing recipes for before, during, and after cancer treatment (2015)

Avery Publishing Group

A beautiful, unique cookbook with delicious recipes for all stages of cancer treatment and recovery, from a two-time cancer survivor and founder of the Cook for Your Life nutrition-based cooking programs. Two-time cancer survivor Ann Ogden Gaffney discovered during her months of treatment for breast cancer that she was able to find powerful relief for her symptoms through cooking. Realizing that other patients and families could benefit from the skills and techniques she'd learned, she began to offer advice, recipes, and free classes to patients. A former fashion consultant, Gaffney realized after her treatment that her heart was no longer in seasonal colors and hemline trends. Instead, she wanted to help people with cancer and their families cook and care for themselves. In 2007,the non-profit organization Cook for Your Life was born. Its programs have received funding from NIH and have been embraced by organizations such as Columbia University's School of Public Health, Mount Sinai, Atlantic Health, the American Cancer Society, and more, and has touched hundreds of thousands of lives. Now Gaffney delivers her highly anticipated cookbook, based on her classes. So many cancer cookbooks are too complicated to follow, or too clinical and uninspired. This is the first cookbook to organize the recipes into categories according to the way patients feel for example, Simple recipes when the patient is fatigued, Safe recipes when a patient's immune system is compromised, and Spicy recipes when a patient is feeling better and needs to wake up her taste buds. With its warmth, authority, beautiful design, and smartly conceived format, Cook for Your Life empowers patients and families to cook their way back to health. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'Artichoke hearts'

Artichoke hearts (2011)

Macmillan Children's Books

Twelve-year-old Mira comes from a chaotic, artistic and outspoken family where it’s not always easy to be heard. As her beloved Nana Josie's health declines, Mira begins to discover the secrets of those around her, and also starts to keep some of her own. She is drawn to mysterious Jide, a boy who is clearly hiding a troubled past and has grown hardened layers - like those of an artichoke - around his heart. As Mira is experiencing grief for the first time, she is also discovering the wondrous and often mystical world around her. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'How to be sick. A Buddhist-inspired guide for the chronically ill and their caregivers'

How to be sick. A Buddhist-inspired guide for the chronically ill and their caregivers (2010)

Wisdom Publications

'How to be sick: A Buddhist-inspired guide for the chronically ill' and their caregiver is about living skilfully with the challenges of any chronic illness or condition. I wrote it for sufferers and for their caregivers (the latter includes people involved in hospice, chaplaincy, and elder care; for those interested in chronic illnesses and conditions (health professionals, family and friends); and for people interested in Buddhism (illness can function as a metaphor for suffering which, along with the cessation of suffering, is at the heart of the Buddha’s teaching). Chronic illnesses or conditions - such as arthritis, heart disease, and diabetes (three among dozens) - while not immediately life-threatening, are life-disrupting and stressful. The book is unique in that each chapter contains easy-to-learn tools and practices to help the chronically ill and their caregivers live skilfully, maintain equanimity, and even find joy despite the profound changes in their lives. A recurring theme in the book is that, although one’s body may be sick, one’s mind can be at peace. Some of the practices presented are traditionally Buddhist. Others I devised after becoming ill. Two are from the work of Byron Katie. Each practice is illustrated with examples from my own experience, so the book is also highly personal. The practices are intended to help with the following types of challenges: Suffering due to the relentlessness of physical symptoms; Blaming oneself for being sick; Cursory or dismissive treatment by doctors and medical professionals; The inability to visit with friends, participate in family gatherings, and take part in other social events; Feeling ignored by family or friends; Suffering due to uncertainty about the future; Coping with the disappointment of failed treatments; Caretaker burnout. At the end of the book is a handy reference guide, summarizing the specific tools and practices that can help with each of the above challenges. (Publisher)

Sorry, no publications found.
Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 7 days a week, 8am-8pm