We understand that people with cancer are worried about coronavirus. Here is the latest guidance. We will update it regularly.

Publications directory

Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 7 days a week, 8am-8pm

The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 93

Cover image of 'My child has finished treatment. What happens next? A guide to follow-up and adjusting to normal life for
parents and carers whose child or teenager has finished treatment for cancer'

My child has finished treatment. What happens next? A guide to follow-up and adjusting to normal life for parents and carers whose child or teenager has finished treatment for cancer (July 2017)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This booklet for the parents and carers of children with cancer aims to help answer some of the many questions that arise when treatment finishes. It discusses feelings and emotions, practical issues, school, and moving on.

Cover image of 'What does super Jonny do when mum gets sick? [Spanish]'

What does super Jonny do when mum gets sick? [Spanish] (2016)

Books For Caring Kids

Jonny is a little superhero with a BIG problem. His Mum is sick. How can he help? Join Super Jonny and Bear, as they go to the hospital to investigate. LEARN who the staff working in the hospital are and what they do. DISCOVER Jonny's secret weapon. Super Jonny is recommended by teachers for teachers. The question page links to the English and New Zealand national curriculums. These questions teach the children how to help the sick. Some people need regular hospital care to manage their disease. These people have their own page entitled: Preparing for a hospital admission: 5 tips for chronically ill moms. This ensures that any mother who is going into hospital, has some supplies when her children visit. This list of simple suggestions could also be filled by any adult wanting to help a Mom who is suddenly sick. With its big bold professionally drawn illustrations, Super Jonny is a valuable resource for your family, school or medical centre. (Publisher).

Cover image of 'What does super Jonny do when mum gets sick?'

What does super Jonny do when mum gets sick? (2014)

Books For Caring Kids

Jonny is a little superhero with a BIG problem. His Mum is sick. How can he help? Join Super Jonny and Bear, as they go to the hospital to investigate. LEARN who the staff working in the hospital are and what they do. DISCOVER Jonny's secret weapon. Super Jonny is recommended by teachers for teachers. The question page links to the English and New Zealand national curriculums. These questions teach the children how to help the sick. Some people need regular hospital care to manage their disease. These people have their own page entitled: Preparing for a hospital admission: 5 tips for chronically ill moms. This ensures that any mother who is going into hospital, has some supplies when her children visit. This list of simple suggestions could also be filled by any adult wanting to help a Mom who is suddenly sick. With its big bold professionally drawn illustrations, Super Jonny is a valuable resource for your family, school or medical centre. (Publisher).

Cover image of 'Behaviour and personality change. A resource to help you understand and manage behaviour and personality change when living with a brain tumour'

Behaviour and personality change. A resource to help you understand and manage behaviour and personality change when living with a brain tumour (January 2020)

Brainstrust

Up 60% of people diagnosed with a brain tumour experience behaviour and personality changes (BPC). This booklet covers: understanding BPC; what we mean by BPC; causes; symptoms; how BPC is manifested; how it is measured; mood journals; strategies to help people cope; and treatment options and self-help strategies. It also has information for carers, details of who can help, and questions to ask.

Cover image of 'Supporting your grandchild and family. An information guide for grandparents of a child or young person diagnosed with cancer'

Supporting your grandchild and family. An information guide for grandparents of a child or young person diagnosed with cancer (April 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Being told your grandchild has cancer comes as a terrible shock. Most grandparents worry not only about their grandchild, but also about how their own son/daughter will cope. Many are also concerned about the effects a cancer diagnosis will have on other children within the family, how they can support their family and how, as grandparents, they themselves will cope. Sometimes, it is not as easy for grandparents to access information first hand and this can lead to feelings of isolation. This guide answers some of the many questions grandparents might have during diagnosis and treatment.

Cover image of 'My dad and me'

My dad and me (June 2019)

Child Bereavement UK

Grieving is not about forgetting the person who has died, but finding ways to remember them; this resource allows young people to document their unique memories of someone special who has died. It is a blank version of ‘Magical Memories of Dad’, created by Child Bereavement UK for two brothers who lost their dad.

Cover image of 'Caring for your child at end of life. A guide for parents and carers'

Caring for your child at end of life. A guide for parents and carers (October 2019)

Together for Short Lives

Practical information to support parents and carers at this difficult time. It aims to answer some of the questions that you might have, and sets out what you should expect from children’s palliative care services with useful links to further sources of information and support. Includes reflections from families on their experience of losing a child. 

Cover image of 'Talking to children about lymphoma'

Talking to children about lymphoma (July 2019)

Lymphoma Action

Guidance for people with lymphoma on what to tell their children and where to find other resources: Should I tell my child?; How can I talk to my child about lymphoma?; What should I say?; Keep communication open; Older children and teenagers; If someone close to you has lymphoma: animations for children; Resources.

Cover image of 'Being there for someone with a terminal illness. Practical and emotional support for carers'

Being there for someone with a terminal illness. Practical and emotional support for carers (April 2019)

Marie Curie

This booklet is for anyone providing care and support for someone living with a terminal illness. It includes details on day-to-day caring, your rights as a carer and how to access professional support. It also focuses on the emotional impact of caring and how to look after your own wellbeing. 

Cover image of 'Cancer treatment and fertility. Information for men'

Cancer treatment and fertility. Information for men (July 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about how cancer and its treatments can affect your fertility. It is for anyone who needs information on this before, during or after cancer treatment. It has information about preserving fertility, testing fertility, fertility treatments to start a pregnancy and other options for having a child. This information is for you whether you are in a relationship or not and whatever your sexual orientation. 

Sorry, no publications found.
Need to talk? Call us free*
0800 808 00 00 7 days a week, 8am-8pm