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Publications directory

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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 25

Cover image of 'Young person's guide to lymphoma'

Young person's guide to lymphoma (January 2020)

Lymphoma Action

Comprehensive booklet for young people with lymphoma. 

Cover image of 'Supporting your grandchild and family. An information guide for grandparents of a child or young person diagnosed with cancer'

Supporting your grandchild and family. An information guide for grandparents of a child or young person diagnosed with cancer (April 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Being told your grandchild has cancer comes as a terrible shock. Most grandparents worry not only about their grandchild, but also about how their own son/daughter will cope. Many are also concerned about the effects a cancer diagnosis will have on other children within the family, how they can support their family and how, as grandparents, they themselves will cope. Sometimes, it is not as easy for grandparents to access information first hand and this can lead to feelings of isolation. This guide answers some of the many questions grandparents might have during diagnosis and treatment.

Cover image of 'I have finished my treatment. What happens next'

I have finished my treatment. What happens next (November 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This booklet for children and teenagers aged 10-16 aims to help answer questions and concerns that arise when treatment for cancer finishes. It covers feelings and emotions, coping with worry, coping with family and friends, school and college, healthy living, and practical issues such as what happens at follow-up, medicines, and what to look out for.

Cover image of 'Fertility. Support for young people affected by cancer'

Fertility. Support for young people affected by cancer (September 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about how cancer and its treatment can affect your fertility. It is for teenagers and young people who need information about this before, during or after cancer treatment, whether you are in a relationship or not and whatever your sexual orientation. It explains how cancer and cancer treatment may affect your fertility and has information about preserving your fertility, having fertility tests, fertility treatments and other options for having a child. It also tells you how to get more support. 

Cover image of 'A young person's guide to dealing with the loss of a brother or sister'

A young person's guide to dealing with the loss of a brother or sister (November 2019)

CLIC Sargent

The death of a brother or sister is likely to be one of the most difficult things that’s ever happened to you. It may even feel like nobody understands what you’re going through, but the fact is help is always at hand. CLIC Sargent has worked closely with young people who have lost a sibling to put together this booklet. As well as showing how this is something others have experienced, we’ve provided contacts to help you find further support and information. Even if you just want someone to talk to, you’ll find all the information you need right here.

Cover image of 'Sex and relationships. Support for young people affected by cancer'

Sex and relationships. Support for young people affected by cancer (May 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is about cancer, sex and relationships. It is for teenagers and young people who are having or have had cancer treatment. It may also help carers, family members and friends. The booklet explains how cancer and cancer treatment may affect your relationships and sex life. It also gives information about coping with any changes and how to get more support.

Cover image of 'Talking to children and teenagers when an adult has cancer'

Talking to children and teenagers when an adult has cancer (May 2019)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This booklet is designed to help people talk to children and teenagers about cancer. It has suggestions about how to tell a child or teenager that you have cancer, understand their reactions, help them cope, explain cancer treatments, and deal with changes to family life.

Cover image of 'Practical advice for young people with lymphoma'

Practical advice for young people with lymphoma (November 2018)

Lymphoma Action

Practical advice on issues that often concern teenagers and young adults (up to 24 years old) with lymphoma. It covers: After diagnosis; Where you will be treated; Your medical team; Looking after yourself; School, university and work; Relationships; After treatment.

Cover image of 'Practical advice for parents and carers of children with lymphoma'

Practical advice for parents and carers of children with lymphoma (November 2018)

Lymphoma Action

This factsheet covers common practical concerns of parents and carers looking after children and young people with lymphoma: When your child is diagnosed; Telling your child; Where your child will be treated; Changes to expect at home; If your child becomes unwell at home; Your child’s diet during treatment; Going back to school; Looking after yourself; Further information and support.

Cover image of 'Cancer WTF? Want the facts?'

Cancer WTF? Want the facts? (February 2018)

CLIC Sargent

This booklet, written with the help of young people living with cancer, aims to answers questions that young people with cancer may have. It covers topics such as making sense of it all, hospital life, family and friends, education, work and finances, and sources of support.

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