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Publications directory

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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 149

Cover image of 'Guide to cancer resources for children and young people'

Guide to cancer resources for children and young people (March 2020)

Macmillan Cancer Support

This list of books, booklets, leaflets, and factsheets for children and young people covers cancer in general, specific cancers, treatments, cancer in others, end of life, and bereavement. It also includes works of fiction that feature cancer. Many of the resources have been reviewed by people affected by cancer and we have linked to the reviews where available.

Cover image of 'Young person's guide to lymphoma'

Young person's guide to lymphoma (January 2020)

Lymphoma Action

Comprehensive booklet for young people with lymphoma. 

Cover image of 'Life at home'

Life at home (2019)

BUPA

This booklet looks at some of the side-effects of different types of cancer treatments. It also offers ideas for small ways children may like to help out at home.  

Cover image of 'Visiting hospital'

Visiting hospital (2019)

BUPA

This booklet explains types of treatment and some of the health professionals who are helping people with cancer to get better. 

Cover image of 'What does it mean?'

What does it mean? (2019)

BUPA

This booklet explains what cancer is and explores some common worries and feelings that children may have - reassuring them that however they react, it’s ok.

Cover image of 'Anna loses her hair. A children’s guide to hair loss as a result of cancer treatment'

Anna loses her hair. A children’s guide to hair loss as a result of cancer treatment (April 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Hair loss is a common side effect of treatment for childhood cancer, but its impact can be significant. This animation tells the story of Anna, Jack and Laura who all lose their hair while having treatment for cancer and helps young children to understand what might happen.

Cover image of 'My dad and me'

My dad and me (June 2019)

Child Bereavement UK

Grieving is not about forgetting the person who has died, but finding ways to remember them; this resource allows young people to document their unique memories of someone special who has died. It is a blank version of ‘Magical Memories of Dad’, created by Child Bereavement UK for two brothers who lost their dad.

Cover image of 'Stem cell transplant. A guide to donor (allogeneic) stem cell transplantation for teenagers and young adults'

Stem cell transplant. A guide to donor (allogeneic) stem cell transplantation for teenagers and young adults (February 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This guide describes stem cells and explains what a stem cell transplantation is, why it might be necessary, and the different types of transplants. It also describes the process of finding a donor, the pre-transplant operation, the transplant team, what to bring to hospital, preparing to receive a bone marrow transplant, what happens during the transplant and afterwards, the side-effects, getting ready to go home and getting back to normal. Includes details of useful organisations and a glossary.

Cover image of 'I have finished my treatment. What happens next'

I have finished my treatment. What happens next (November 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

This booklet for children and teenagers aged 10-16 aims to help answer questions and concerns that arise when treatment for cancer finishes. It covers feelings and emotions, coping with worry, coping with family and friends, school and college, healthy living, and practical issues such as what happens at follow-up, medicines, and what to look out for.

Cover image of 'Donating your stem cells to your brother or sister. A guide to stem cell (bone marrow) donation for teenagers and young adults'

Donating your stem cells to your brother or sister. A guide to stem cell (bone marrow) donation for teenagers and young adults (May 2019)

Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

Illustrated, colour booklet for children who may be donating bone marrow or stem cells to a sibling. It describes stem cells and stem cell transplants, why a transplant is needed, the types of transplants, the selection process, tissue typing, harvesting the bone marrow (including the risks and side-effects), and what happens if the transplant is unsuccessful. It also covers issues such as consent, what to take into hospital, and changes to sibling relationships. Includes details of useful organisations and a glossary of terms.

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