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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 192

Cover image of 'All to live for. Fighting cancer. Finding hope.'

All to live for. Fighting cancer. Finding hope. (2017)

Headline

In 2005 Emma Hannigan was 32, happily married to her long-time love, with two young children. Her world was shattered when she discovered that she had the rare gene BRCA1, meaning a 50% chance of developing ovarian cancer and an 85% chance of breast cancer. To reduce the risk, Emma had a double mastectomy and both ovaries removed, but in 2007 received the news that cancer had struck anyway. Twelve years later, Emma is battling cancer for the tenth time. With warmth and wisdom, she shares her journey and her advice on everything from skincare and hair loss to how to keep a sense of humour through it all. All to Live For is a story of one woman's determination not to let cancer win; a story of strength and inspiration, hope and love. And of never giving up. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Well. A doctor's journey through fear to freedom'

Well. A doctor's journey through fear to freedom (2017)

Saraband

When Dr Mary Gunn was diagnosed with cancer, her first reaction was fear, and to fight the disease aggressively for the sake of not only herself but her young children and husband. But when it came back – and turned out to be incurable – she knew that she couldn’t live the rest of her life in fear. Mary embraced a new approach to life: to accept all the joy and sorrow, safety and danger, certainty and unpredictability… in essence, to live freely. In our uncertain times, when it’s difficult not to feel the fear, Dr Mary Gunn’s remarkable memoir offers mindfulness tools for resilience, and shows how we can all use acceptance, compassion and love to live courageously, magnificently. Backed up by many years of experience as both a doctor and a patient, her story will inspire you to let go of fear, love life and live well. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Chemo summer. An uplifting breast cancer experience'

Chemo summer. An uplifting breast cancer experience (2017)

Austin Macauley

In Chemo Summer Jane Hoggar takes the reader through a light-hearted and informative account of her discovery of breast cancer and its cure. Cancer of any description has the capacity to chill those it affects and their loved ones. But for Jane Hoggar early discovery and diagnosis provided for a satisfactory resolution. And it's these small details that might well help people in a similar situation. For example, Jane did not discover a lump, which is the usual thing in breast cancer, but a sag' when she raised her arms and it was her insistence that something was wrong that resulted in a vital early medical diagnosis. All the side issues are covered in the book, effects of chemo and radiotherapy, hair loss and wigs, changes in diet and exercise, making Chemo Summer a valuable and engaging look into a serious and often frightening subject. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Love, light and mermaid tails. One woman's healing journey back to wholeness through stage four cancer'

Love, light and mermaid tails. One woman's healing journey back to wholeness through stage four cancer (2017)

Fi Munro

In January 2016, at the age of 30, Fi Munro was diagnosed with non-genetic stage four ovarian cancer. In that moment, after months of pain, tests and assurances that it was ‘nothing to worry about’, her instincts were proved right and her worst fears were realised. In the months that followed, understanding her diagnosis, recovery and health became her full-time job. Using her expertise as a researcher she dedicated her time to understanding everything she could about her diagnosis and subsequent prognosis. In this honest, open and often tear-jerking account of her journey back to wholeness, Fi openly shares her story from diagnosis with stage four ‘terminal’ cancer to living an incredible, healthy life full of joy and laughter. This book is a guide for anyone, not just those with cancer, who wants to embrace a happier, healthier and more caring approach to their life. May it bring you hope, peace and, above all, joy. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Dolly daydreamer'

Dolly daydreamer (2017)

Austin Macauley

Rachel and Simon have been married for a long time. They are both parents and grandparents. They love Portugal, but life isn’t as perfect as it appears on the surface. Rachel had breast cancer and as time goes on, family circumstances threaten the very fabric of the family. Is their family unit strong enough to survive what the future has in store for Rachel, Simon and the rest of their family? (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Going on the turn. A memoir'

Going on the turn. A memoir (2017)

Weidenfeld and Nicholson

Danny Baker's third volume of memoirs barrels along at the same cracking pace as its predecessors, the bestselling Going to Sea in a Sieve (the inspiration for the major TV series Cradle to Grave and subsequent nationwide tour) and Going off Alarming. With his trademark exuberance, he recalls the years which included six years' involvement in the massive TV hit TFI Friday ('piling it up with hellzapoppin' ideas') - during which time he stalked John Cleese in New York, entertained David Bowie and Paul McCartney, bizarrely reunites with Sir Michael Caine, gets befriended by Peter O'Toole and becomes a member of Led Zeppelin for 35 minutes. However, the tales are not reliant on celebrity alone, and the book comes packed with the usual quota of Baker family jewels, including Spud's attitude to doctors, Danny's trip to Amsterdam to get stoned for the first time (he fails), getting caught up in football rioting, and the now infamous 'kaboom' of an outburst following his despatch from BBC London. And then there's the cancer. Spoiler alert: this is the one in which he almost dies. Further spoiler alert: he doesn't. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Dear cancer, love Victoria: a mum’s diary of hope'

Dear cancer, love Victoria: a mum’s diary of hope (2017)

Trapeze (Orion)

Renowned as a much-loved and highly respected BBC journalist, Victoria Derbyshire has spent 20 years finding the human story behind the headlines. In 2015 she found herself at the heart of the news, with a devastating breast cancer diagnosis. With honesty and openness, she decided to live out her treatment and recovery in the spotlight in a series of video diaries that encouraged thousands to seek diagnosis and help. Victoria has kept a diary since she was nine years old and in DEAR CANCER, LOVE VICTORIA she shares her day to day experiences of life following her diagnosis and coming to terms with a future that wasn't planned. From the moment she woke up to find her right breast had collapsed, to telling her partner and children, through to mastectomy and chemotherapy. From wearing a wig to work and hiding it from her colleagues, to the relief and joy of finishing treatment before immediately flying to Glasgow to present a debate on the European Referendum. By sharing her story, she became the person that mums, daughters, sisters, husbands, boyfriends and family members contacted to thank as they tried to find ways to cope with their own and their loved ones' prognosis, and needed to know that they were not alone. Victoria's story is an affecting and at times heart-breaking one but it is so often laugh-out-loud too. Moving, wonderfully heartwarming and ultimately uplifting, this is a powerful account of a brave struggle told with honesty, courage and emotion that gives strength to anyone touched by cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The bright hour. A memoir of living and dying'

The bright hour. A memoir of living and dying (2017)

The Text Publishing Company (UK) Ltd

In January 2015 Nina was diagnosed with breast cancer, and it metastasised later that year. She was thirty-eight years old; her mother had died only a few months earlier from multiple myeloma. Nina Riggs grew up in a contemplative family: her great-great-great-grandfather was Ralph Waldo Emerson, and she was raised to turn to his essays for 'guidance, inspiration, and something to push against'. THE BRIGHT HOUR is Nina's intimate, unflinching account of 'living with death in the room'. She tells her story in a series of absurd, poignant and often hilarious vignettes drawn from a life that has 'no real future or arc left to it, yet still goes on as if it does'. This unforgettable memoir leads the reader into the innermost chambers of the writer's life: into the mind and heart, the work and home and family, of a young woman alternately seeking to make peace with and raging against the reality of her approaching death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The finch in my brain'

The finch in my brain (2017)

Hodder & Stoughton

When film producer Martino Sclavi began experiencing intense headaches, he attributed them to his frenetic lifestyle. As it turned out, he had grade 4 brain cancer and was given 18 months to live. After undergoing brain surgery - while awake - Martino found he had lost the ability to recognise words. His response was to close his eyes and begin to move his fingers across the keyboard to write this, an account of life before diagnosis and since. Defying all predictions Martino is still very much alive, words read out to him by the monotone of a computerised voice he calls Alex. But he must now live in a new way. This book - that he has written but cannot read - charts the effects of his experience: on his relationship with his young son, his marriage, his work and with himself. In the wake of his illness, everything must be reconfigured and Martino is made to question the habits, dreams and beliefs of his old life and confront the present. What he finds is strange and beautiful. Searching for the words between life and death, Sclavi shows that with determination and a subtle, persistent sense of humour, it is possible to change the story of our lives. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Hug everyone you know: a year of community, courage, and cancer'

Hug everyone you know: a year of community, courage, and cancer (2017)

She Writes Press

Antoinette Martin believed herself to be a healthy and sturdy woman--that is, until she received a Stage 1 breast cancer diagnosis. Cancer is scary enough for the brave, but for a wimp like Martin, it was downright terrifying. Martin had to swallow waves of nausea at the thought of her body being poisoned, and frequently fainted during blood draws and infusions. To add to her terror, cancer suddenly seemed to be all around her. In the months following her diagnosis, a colleague succumbed to cancer, and five of her friends were also diagnosed. Though tempted, Martin knew she could not hide in bed for ten months. She had a devoted husband, daughters, and a tribe of friends and relations. Along with work responsibilities, there were graduations, anniversaries, and roller derby bouts to attend, not to mention a house to sell and a summer of beach-bumming to enjoy. In order to harness support without scaring herself or anyone else, she journaled her experiences and began to e-mail the people who loved her--the people she called My Everyone. She kept them informed and reminded all to 'hug everyone you know' at every opportunity. Reading the responses became her calming strategy. Ultimately, with the help of her community, Martin found the courage within herself to face cancer with perseverance and humor. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Tommy v cancer.  One man's battle against the big C'

Tommy v cancer. One man's battle against the big C (2017)

Independently published

On Thursday, 10th of March 2016, I returned home from a hospital appointment and broke the news to my wife and children. I had throat cancer. Stage four. Inoperable. Desperately needing some way to make sense of my situation, I set up a blog to chart my battle against the disease. I hoped it would allow me to understand more about this thing inside me, and what I would have to go through in terms of treatment to try to eradicate it. I also thought it might help other people who found themselves in similar circumstances. I made a promise to my readers to be open and honest all the way. I wouldn't hold anything back, no matter how unpleasant. Now, over a year later, I have adapted that blog into this book. It details my journey from when I first realised that something was wrong, through the intense courses of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, to where I am today. To say that journey was difficult is a vast understatement. The side effects of my treatment utterly kicked my arse, causing me to lose over half my bodyweight and fall seriously ill with double pneumonia and sepsis. Totally unresponsive, I was rushed into intensive care where the doctors told my family that, if they couldn't stabilise me, I had approximately two hours left to live. One option was to put me into a medically induced coma, although the chances were high that I would never emerge from it. Imagine someone telling you that about your loved one as they lie there, unconscious and struggling to breathe. Cancer is an invader that affects more than just the patient. Everyone suffers - spouses, siblings, children, extended family, friends. Even, as I was to discover, strangers from all over the world. I was overwhelmed with the love and kindness of almost everyone who contacted me, but I also suffered terrible abuse at the hands of online trolls. I should warn you that parts of this book do not make for easy reading. I kept my promise to be honest, and wrote many of the blog entries when I was depressed and scared, certain I wouldn't live to see another dawn. I convinced myself that I would quickly perish, leaving my wife and two sons - then aged 9 and 17 - alone, and with no-one to protect them or provide for them. I wouldn't get to see them grow up, develop into young men, and eventually have children of their own. The prospect terrified me. For those of you who followed my blog and read the posts as I uploaded them, you haven't seen everything. This book c

Cover image of 'The little c'

The little c (2017)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

On a chilly, damp, foggy, September morning, Charlie slowly walks into the downstairs brightly lit florescent kitchen. His eyes react to the light reflecting off the large white cabinets. He touches the tender swollen lump under the left side of his neck and winces in pain. Charlie knows that something is wrong with him. He’s afraid to tell his mom and dad for fear that learning what may be causing the lump in his neck may be related to the sickness he almost died from when he was born. He doesn’t want to put his family through the stress and uncertainty that they went through twelve years ago. But he knows if he doesn’t say something, his parents may never forgive him. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Storm in a D cup! One woman’s journey through breast cancer'

Storm in a D cup! One woman’s journey through breast cancer (2017)

Debbie Paton Publishing

Storm in a D Cup! is a blow-by-blow account of Debbie Paton's journey through breast cancer. It is a candid account of the year between her initial diagnosis and her full recovery. When she was first diagnosed, Debbie wrote notes in a diary, but her daughter Georgia dragged her into the 21st century by convincing her to write a blog that could be shared with a wider audience. The blog soon became Debbie's cathartic writing. It gave her the freedom to express the rollercoaster of emotions as they happened, the good, the bad and the irrational. She shared her entries on social media for her friends and family to follow – it took the pressure off endless update phone calls! This is a no holds barred account of the mix of emotions, the highs and lows of the journey. It is not about doom and gloom, but rather the realities of the journey and the experiences Debbie had along the way. It is at times poignant and highly sensitive, at others, filled with laughter and fun. It was a year that shaped her life into something different. It is Debbie’s hope that her experiences can help others by alleviating some of the fear surrounding a breast cancer diagnosis. If she could have read a similar blog before starting her own journey, Debbie feels certain she would’ve been far less fearful of what lay ahead. Yes, everyone's path is different, but there are elements of her experience that will resonate with others in the same position. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The cancer whisperer. How to let cancer heal your life'

The cancer whisperer. How to let cancer heal your life (2016)

Coronet (Hodder & Stoughton)

This book does not offer a cure for cancer. It offers a cure for your fear of cancer. Both memoir and self-help book, this is the remarkable chronicle of a passage from 'terminal' diagnosis to exuberant wellness in just a few months. The Cancer Whisperer reverses our traditional adversarial relationship with cancer by teaching us how to listen to it; how to be healed by it as well as seek to cure it; and how to be emotionally free of illness even when physically curtailed. Living on the frontier between her fierce will to live and necessary willingness to die, Sophie - now thriving with cancer - shares her journey with searing honesty, unapologetic vulnerability and intelligent pragmatism. Alongside rare insights into a condition now affecting approximately one in three people, she challenges the mental conditioning we need to overcome to redefine our narratives about cancer. As 'the cancer whisperer', she offers a groundbreaking practical guide that will encourage cancer patients to: Direct their own treatment while preserving their personhood in a system that tends to see them as patients more than people. Engage with fear, anger and grief in healthy and healing ways instead of toughing it out, trying to be positive or collapsing into despair. Radically shift from being a cancer victim to a cancer listener-to seeing cancer less as a disease than as a symptom of other underlying causes, and engaging proactively with whatever changes it calls on them to make. Discover what the author calls 'the whispering, the reaching into a well of darkness and finding your hands painted with light'. Inspired, wise and moving, this book is as unflinching as Lisa Lynch's The C Word, as uplifting as Kris Carr's Crazy, Sexy Cancer, and carries us to a new threshold in our relationship with cancer, strengthening our ability to meet it with courage, creativity, gratitude and grace. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The shock factor. Sarah's story – beating breast cancer one day at a time'

The shock factor. Sarah's story – beating breast cancer one day at a time (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

The door handle started to turn and I knew this was the moment that could change my life forever. Mr Mahadev appeared with another staff member. He introduced himself and then introduced Sally, a breast care nurse, and sat down beside me. He started to go through my notes: family history, the results of the mammogram and the biopsy. Then he delivered the devastating news... I’m really sorry but the mammogram has shown two tumours in the left breast. Sarah Pickles was a normal 32-year-old married woman with a young daughter. On 22nd September 2014 her life changed as she was given the devastating news that she had a triple-negative breast cancer. Read about how Sarah dealt with her diagnosis and how she survived cancer as she shares all the high, lows, tears, and laughter of her journey. This honest and raw account of Sarah’s cancer journey also includes lots of information and top tips on diet, exercise, health, and beauty. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The fabulous woman’s guide through cancer'

The fabulous woman’s guide through cancer (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

"The fabulous woman’s guide through cancer" is for every woman touched by cancer but still determined to feel in control of their life. Giving real advice from a number of fabulous women affected by cancer, it includes tips, examples, stories, memoirs, information and ideas covering everything from post-operation styling, ideas to stay social when you can't go out, dealing with doctors, ways to stay lifted and lots more, all with plenty of kind words and inspiration to keep women on-track during this time. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Cancer with a small 'c''

Cancer with a small 'c' (2016)

Self-published using WritersWorld

This book follows the journey of my life through approximately a ten-year period during which time I was diagnosed with breast cancer. It contains highs and lows and hopefully will shine a positive light on this disease that will encourage other women.v Although any cancer diagnosis is devastating not only to a patient but also to their family, a positive outlook, a grateful heart and a belief that life can only get better is vital to recovery. There will be readers who understand the attitude that overtook me at the time; my marriage breakdown will resonate with others - just as our reconciliation will also be close to the hearts of some people.I also draw on some hilarious moments, because it wasn't all bad, my cancer attacked me when I was most in need of a break from life. Disastrous, worrying, life threatening and emotionally draining, the story will touch on some very personal, sad moments but also the victorious end when I refuse to even acknowledge that I had cancer. Yes, it was real, but it deserves no place in my life any more and certainly no capital 'c'.A cathartic book for me and hopefully an encouragement to others who may be going through a similar situation to mine, this book is an honest account of how I drove myself to get well again. Ten years on, my life is so different that I hardly recognise the person in the story. But it was me and it is my story. (Author)

Cover image of 'Living with Timmy'

Living with Timmy (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

The writer’s personal story, who on the threshold of retirement, is diagnosed with a rare brain tumour. How will he cope as he uncovers more and more detail about the tumour? Does he opt for risky brain surgery or for a “watch and wait” strategy? And will his life ever be the same again? Follow his personal journey from diagnosis to the present day in this story. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'In-between days. A memoir about living with cancer'

In-between days. A memoir about living with cancer (2016)

House of Anansi Press

Teva Harrison was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer at the age of 37. In this brilliant and inspiring graphic memoir, she documents through comic illustration and short personal essays what it means to live with the disease. Ultimately redemptive and uplifting, In-Between Days reminds each one of us how beautiful life is, and what a gift. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A whole new me. Getting to the bottom of bowel cancer'

A whole new me. Getting to the bottom of bowel cancer (2016)

Self-published using XLibris

Come with me on a journey to self-love, self-esteem, and self-healing. I share my experiences with you as a survivor of bowel cancer. I will lead you along my journey from crappy to happy, allow you to feel the multitude of emotions associated with recovery, and share insights into my holistic approach to the wonderful and fulfilling life I now live. Let me also share my successful approach to living life to the fullest, accepting myself and allowing only positive people and experiences to enter my universe. (Publishers)

Cover image of 'A series of catastrophes and miracles. A true story of love, science and cancer'

A series of catastrophes and miracles. A true story of love, science and cancer (2016)

National Geographic

After being diagnosed in her early 40s with metastatic melanoma, journalist and mother of two Mary Elizabeth Williams finds herself in a race against the clock. She takes a once-in-a-lifetime chance and joins a clinical trial for immunotherapy, a revolutionary drug regimen that trains the body to vanquish malignant cells. Astonishingly, her cancer disappears entirely in just a few weeks. But at the same time, her best friend embarks on a cancer journey of her own - with very different results. Williams's experiences as a patient and a medical test subject reveal with stark honesty what it takes to weather disease, the extraordinary new developments that are rewriting the rules of science - and the healing power of human connection. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Embroidered cancer comic'

Embroidered cancer comic (2016)

Singing Dragon (Jessica Kingsley)

'Come to bed with me?' 'Huh? No, I'd rather read this book about cancer...' As soon as Bob was diagnosed with aggressive prostate cancer, he and his wife Elizabeth started making cancer jokes to take the edge off of an otherwise frightening situation. A lot of those jokes were about sex. Here, textile artist Elizabeth Shefrin has picked up a needle and thread to share those intimate jokes, revealing how they helped her and her husband to process the realities of cancer treatment. Giving lightness and humour to a rarely discussed topic, this unpretentious and wry embroidered comic will create awareness and discourse around a taboo topic, resonating with others in similar situations and reassuring us that it's ok to laugh. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Living for a reason - a true cancer journey'

Living for a reason - a true cancer journey (2016)

Austin Macauley

There can be up to 50,000 cases of breast cancer a year in the UK. Ann, in J.A. Prescott's Living for a Reason, is just one. On receiving the news of her condition Ann greets it with the response - You haven't told me that I'm dying yet?' and that is the spirit she carries throughout the book. It is a moving and powerful portrait of a woman who, faced with the vicissitudes of cancer, determines to live life to the full. The book shows Ann as she goes through the stages of cancer and the phases of treatment; the well known mastectomy, the loss of hair, the cosmetic surgery, the chemotherapy and the less well-known side-effects of the drugs. With her condition compounded with the onset of arthritis Ann's determination is inspirational and her story is one of great courage. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Achievement: cancer free for 20 years'

Achievement: cancer free for 20 years (2016)

Achievement Specialists Ltd

Full of tips, tools, techniques, and the secrets Curly Martin used to overcome cancer. How she now lives a passionate, exciting, healthy, wealthy, happy life. Curly Martin was diagnosed with breast cancer, and an aggressive form of lymphatic cancer in 1992 and she was given nine months to live. At that time she became homeless and was unemployed. This book is all about her fascinating and funny 20 year journey from cancer to coaching. Since the terminal diagnosis, she has become an international bestselling author of, The Coaching Handbook Series of books. She is a highly sought-after international speaker, a pioneer of life coach training and the founder of a very successful training company, Achievement Specialists Limited. She intuitively combines her personal experiences with accepted methodologies and cutting edge innovations, to create exciting, very entertaining and effective approaches to living a healthy, happy and successful life. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Fighting spirit. A cancer survivor’s journey'

Fighting spirit. A cancer survivor’s journey (2016)

Austin Macauley

When your enemy is clearly visible, it makes fighting them so much easier, than if they are elusive, such as cancer. Being diagnosed with cancer is everybody's worst nightmare. It is automatically seen as a death sentence. It was no different for Nicolas. His first thoughts were about his mortality, but to help him through his treatment and recovery he used the skills and discipline he had learnt in martial arts. His 'Fighting Spirit' helped him deal with everything that cancer brings with it, along with his faith and support network of family and friends. Rather than focusing on the negative, Nicolas remains positive, using references from some of his favourite films to give him direction, steering him towards a healthy, cancer-free future. The 'Fighting Spirit' helps Nicolas to see his cancer as an enemy that needs to be defeated in battle. He uses his martial arts mindset to visualise and conquer his foe. There will be only one winner. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The buoy projects. A story of breast cancer, bucket-lists, life lessons, Facebook and love'

The buoy projects. A story of breast cancer, bucket-lists, life lessons, Facebook and love (2016)

Self-published using AuthorHouse

Wanda Stairs Howard was many things to many people, but first and foremost, she was a mother, grandmother, and wife. Her daughter Lorna’s book is an account of how Wanda took what was left of her life and squeezed it until the pips squeaked, how she and her tireless Team Wanda celebrated her life whilst she was still living it, and how eventually they set her free for the ultimate journey. This book was written because so many people responded so strongly to her story as it played out through the medium of Facebook, and many of those people asked Lorna to put her mother’s story into print so that she could inspire others who weren’t lucky enough to know her personally. By the end of the book, I hope that readers will feel like they knew Wanda and that many will take comfort and inspiration from her life and death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Rising from the ashes of loss: my voyage through grief'

Rising from the ashes of loss: my voyage through grief (2016)

Ayni Books

Death is inevitable and is an existential fear for all human beings. But it is the devastating thought of departing this earth alone and in agony that renders our inevitable transition such a fearful endeavour. For many, it is not so much facing the afterlife, as most religions provide some support in that area, but it is in the way we will end our lives that is the major source of concern. How many of us hope and pray to be blessed with an angel, a loved one that will give us the patient support and attend to our very needs during our last days? Such dedicated souls are few and far apart, and rare are the ones that will undertake that exhausting and onerous task. This book is about one of them though, Pierre, a loving husband who, without hesitation, put his life aside to become the sole caretaker of his wife, Louise, diagnosed with a devastating cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Rise. Surviving and thriving after trauma'

Rise. Surviving and thriving after trauma (2016)

Weidenfeld and Nicholson

Renowned as a much-loved and highly respected journalist and broadcaster with thirty years' experience, Sian Williams has studied the impact of acute stress for many years and is also a trained trauma assessor. In RISE, she explores the science of resilience and growth after trauma, offers advice from the experts, and learns from those who have emerged from horrific experiences, feeling changed yet stronger, with a new perspective on their life, their relationships and their work. She also documents her own path through breast cancer, with candid and unflinching honesty. Her story provides a narrative thread through a book designed to help others deal with all manner of adversity, including physical or mental ill health; loss of a loved one; abuse and post-traumatic stress. RISE is a deeply researched exploration of trauma, grief and illness, and most importantly resilience in the darkest of days. It is an inspiring and powerful piece of work, full of honesty, warmth and wisdom. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'It's all just rock and roll...: a terrifically truthful tale of one girl's bust up with breast cancer'

It's all just rock and roll...: a terrifically truthful tale of one girl's bust up with breast cancer (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

A truly inspirational story about love, life, happiness and hair. A true story about a girl's victorious battle with breast cancer. She had a choice to make - to crumble or to fight. Her daughter was four, her job was full on and she was spinning a million plates. She was the queen of dodging reality through all the twists and turns of life. This was different - she had to find a way to face her worst fears and to get herself out of the pickle of all pickles. Little did she know that the very same disease that had claimed her parents when she was far too young was to be her most unlikely saviour. She tells the story in real time with humour, a blunt Yorkshire honesty and breath taking courage. What really happens when you're trying to keep your head (and your hair) when the rest of the world is going mad. And what really happens when you finally find your very own sunshine. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The butterfly within. A triathlete's race against a brain tumour'

The butterfly within. A triathlete's race against a brain tumour (2016)

Book Guild Publishing

"The butterfly within" follows Special Educational Needs PE teacher and international triathlete Rachel Bown through a year which changes her life forever. It begins on the day she is diagnosed with a brain tumour and finishes when she proudly returns to racing for Team GB. The reader is taken on a roller coaster ride of emotions. We witness hope exploring new depths and determination reaching new heights. She writes about the characters she meets along the way and how they have helped her to become the person she is today. Throughout her story, Rachel recognises the love of those closest to her and understands fully how lucky she is to have their unwavering support. Her focus is always on embracing the life she has been given and defying the so-called insurmountable. Rachel's humorous outlook will have the reader laughing with her wit and honesty; and perhaps shedding a few tears at the low points of her story. Fundamentally, she wants to show that people are good and kind and that if you have faith, there is always hope. A truly inspirational story as Rachel fights her tumour with everything she's got! (Publisher)

Cover image of 'I’m just a person. My year of death, cancer and epiphany'

I’m just a person. My year of death, cancer and epiphany (2016)

Bluebird (Pan Macmillan)

In the span of four months in 2012, Tig Notaro was hospitalized for a debilitating intestinal disease called C. diff, her mother unexpectedly died, she went through a breakup, and then she was diagnosed with bilateral breast cancer. Hit with this devastating barrage, Tig took her grief onstage. Days after receiving her cancer diagnosis, she broke new comedic ground, opening an unvarnished set with the words: 'Good evening. Hello. I have cancer. How are you? Hi, how are you? Is everybody having a good time? I have cancer.' The set instantly went viral, and was ultimately released as Tig's sophomore album, Live, which sold one hundred thousand units in just six weeks and was later nominated for a Grammy. Now, the wildly popular star takes stock of that no good, very bad year - a difficult yet astonishing period in which tragedy turned into absurdity and despair transformed into joy. An inspired combination of the deadpan silliness of her comedy and the open-hearted vulnerability that has emerged in the wake of that dire time, I'm Just a Person is a moving and often hilarious look at this very brave, very funny woman's journey into the darkness and her thrilling return from it. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'What doesn’t kill you, makes you stronger'

What doesn’t kill you, makes you stronger (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

“You’ve got cancer” – three little words that can change your life. “What Doesn’t Kill You, Makes You Stronger” is the honest, straight-from-the-heart account of one woman’s experience of hearing these three words. Right from the start, it follows every step of this journey – and it IS a journey – the tears and laughter, the ups and downs and everything in between. There is loads of information available that give you the facts about what it’s like to be diagnosed with cancer, what happens next, what the options are for treatment and a how to have a life alongside a cancer diagnosis. Most of these are written by those who have never had cancer. Not many of them share the emotional and psychological effects that being diagnosed have. This book does. It talks about the real side effects of chemo, the strange things you crave or can’t stand, the powerful friendships that develop and the fierce spirit within, which is determined to beat cancer. It’s not a “poor me” story……it’s a frank and honest account that has one purpose – to help other people who find themselves with a cancer diagnosis, to show them that what they are thinking and feeling is “OK”, that they aren’t alone and that it’s ok to have a laugh. “What Doesn’t Kill You, Makes You Stronger” – very frank, very honest and very true. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The pink unicorns of male breast cancer'

The pink unicorns of male breast cancer (2016)

Blossom Spring Publishing

Alan Herbert is a West London born, ex forces, motorcycle riding, all action grandfather who now lives in The Netherlands with his family. In 2012, he was diagnosed with breast cancer. Alan vividly describes his battle with cancer and the often absurd situations he finds himself in as he fights not only the killer disease, but also the ignorance borne out of the feminization of breast cancer. Follow Alan’s courageous story that shows not only the determination, but the admirable spirit of a man who battled and survived. An inspirational, gripping, and down-to-earth story written from a man’s point of view in dealing with breast cancer. “Men have breasts too!” (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'In gratitude'

In gratitude (2016)

Bloomsbury Publishing

The future flashed before my eyes in all its pre-ordained banality. Embarrassment, at first, to the exclusion of all other feelings. But embarrassment curled at the edges with a weariness. I got a joke in. 'So - we'd better get cooking the meth,' I said to the Poet. In August 2014, Jenny Diski was diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer and given 'two or three years' to live. She didn't know how to react. All responses felt scripted, laden with cliché. Being a writer, she decided to write about it (grappling with the unoriginality even of this), and also to tell a story she has not yet told: that of being taken in, aged fifteen, by the author Doris Lessing, and the subsequent fifty years of their complex relationship. In September 2014 Jenny Diski began writing in the London Review of Books, describing her experience of living with terminal cancer, examining her life and history with Doris Lessing: the fairy-tale rescue from 'the bin' as a teenager, the difficulties of being absorbed into an unfamiliar family and the influence this had on her. Swooping from one memory to the next - alighting on the hysterical battlefield of her parental home, her expulsion from school, stacking shelves in Banbury and the drug-taking twenty-something in and out of psychiatric hospitals, Diski paints a portrait of two extraordinary writers - Lessing and herself. From one of our most original voices comes a book like no other: a cerebral, witty, dazzlingly candid masterpiece about an uneasy relationship; about memory and writing, ingratitude and anger; about living with illness and facing death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Dying. A memoir'

Dying. A memoir (2016)

Canongate Books Ltd

At the age of sixty, Cory Taylor was dying of melanoma-related brain cancer. With her illness no longer treatable, she began at the start of 2016 to write about her experiences and, in an extraordinary creative surge, wrote what would become Dying: A Memoir. This is a brief and clear-eyed account of what dying taught Cory: amid the tangle of her feelings, she reflects on the patterns of her life, and remembers the lives and deaths of her parents. She tells us why she would like to be able to choose the circumstances of her own death. Dying is about the vulnerability and strength, courage and humility, anger and acceptance that it takes to live a good life and say goodbye to it in peace. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'They said I had six months to live. Surviving prostate cancer – 10 years on'

They said I had six months to live. Surviving prostate cancer – 10 years on (2016)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

There are few things in life as shocking as finding out that you are about to die. We all know, of course, that this is an inevitable part of living but we put it out of mind. Yes life will end, but not today, not any time soon. Coming face to face with the reality that it could indeed be sometime soon is just one part of being diagnosed with terminal cancer. There are other things too - coping with treatment, coping with the side effects of treatment, dealing with the reactions of loved ones. Then there is the constant uncertainty of the next blood test, and the difficulty of getting on with everyday life, fearful of what the future might bring. However, the crunch is that this is a terminal illness which can only end one way. This is the story of how I dealt with that... (Publisher)

Cover image of 'When breath becomes air'

When breath becomes air (2016)

The Bodley Head

At the age of thirty-six, on the verge of completing a decade’s worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, and the next he was a patient struggling to live. And just like that, the future he and his wife had imagined evaporated. When Breath Becomes Air chronicles Kalanithi’s transformation from a naïve medical student “possessed,” as he wrote, “by the question of what, given that all organisms die, makes a virtuous and meaningful life” into a neurosurgeon at Stanford working in the brain, the most critical place for human identity, and finally into a patient and new father confronting his own mortality. What makes life worth living in the face of death? What do you do when the future, no longer a ladder toward your goals in life, flattens out into a perpetual present? What does it mean to have a child, to nurture a new life as another fades away? These are some of the questions Kalanithi wrestles with in this profoundly moving, exquisitely observed memoir. Paul Kalanithi died in March 2015, while working on this book, yet his words live on as a guide and a gift to us all. “I began to realize that coming face to face with my own mortality, in a sense, had changed nothing and everything,” he wrote. “Seven words from Samuel Beckett began to repeat in my head: ‘I can’t go on. I’ll go on.’” When Breath Becomes Air is an unforgettable, life-affirming reflection on the challenge of facing death and on the relationship between doctor and patient, from a brilliant writer who became both. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'I am here. Stories from a cancer ward'

I am here. Stories from a cancer ward (2016)

Scribe Publications

Looking for more meaning in his work, Johannes Klabbers gave up a tenured academic position to spend his days caring for the sick and dying. He trained as a secular pastoral carer in a cancer hospital, and from the patients there he learned how simply talking and listening can provide comfort: from chatting about the football to discussing life’s meaning and how one prepares for death. I Am Here is a frank, moving, and sometimes funny record of his encounters. It gives an unforgettable insight into the variety of ways people cope with suffering, and suggests how we can support them — through caring, through conversation, and by acknowledging that although we may not be able to answer all of life’s questions, we can face them together. From one of the saddest places comes this powerful affirmation of our capacity for humane care. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Marrow. A love story'

Marrow. A love story (2016)

Harper Wave (HarperCollins imprint)

The author of the New York Times bestseller Broken Open returns with a visceral and profound memoir of two sisters who, in the face of a bone marrow transplant—one the donor and one the recipient—begin a quest for acceptance, authenticity, and most of all, love. A mesmerizing and courageous memoir: the story of two sisters uncovering the depth of their love through the life-and-death experience of a bone marrow transplant. Throughout her life, Elizabeth Lesser has sought understanding about what it means to be true to oneself and, at the same time, truly connected to the ones we love. But when her sister Maggie needs a bone marrow transplant to save her life, and Lesser learns that she is the perfect match, she faces a far more immediate and complex question about what it really means to love—honestly, generously, and authentically. Hoping to give Maggie the best chance possible for a successful transplant, the sisters dig deep into the marrow of their relationship to clear a path to unconditional acceptance. They leave the bone marrow transplant up to the doctors, but take on what Lesser calls a "soul marrow transplant," examining their family history, having difficult conversations, examining old assumptions, and offering forgiveness until all that is left is love for each other’s true selves. Their process—before, during, and after the transplant—encourages them to take risks of authenticity in other aspects their lives. But life does not follow the storylines we plan for it. Maggie’s body is ultimately too weak to fight the relentless illness. As she and Lesser prepare for the inevitable, they grow ever closer as their shared blood cells become a symbol of the enduring bond they share. Told with suspense and humor, Marrow is joyous and heartbreaking, incandescent and profound. The story reveals how even our most difficult experiences can offer unexpected spiritual growth. Reflecting on the multifaceted nature of love—love of other, love of self, love of the world—Marrow is an unflinching and beautiful memoir about getting to the very center of ourselves. (Publisher) 

Cover image of 'Tea & chemo. Fighting cancer, living life'

Tea & chemo. Fighting cancer, living life (2015)

Urbane Publications Limited

At the age of 45, wife and mother Jackie Buxton was diagnosed with breast cancer. Lurching between the crippling fear that the cancer had spread, and the great comfort of knowing she was one of the lucky ones who could be treated, she did what she always does when life presents her with a challenge: she wrote it down. Jackie quickly realised that even with cancer, life was far from bad. Never known for her scientific prowess, she nonetheless became a 'bit of an expert' - at least in the field of hair loss, water retention and biscuits - and decided to use her writing to share experiences and help others recognise you don't have to be defined by your cancer. Tea & Chemo is full of laughter, tears, honesty and hope, and offers inspirational words to everyone facing the life challenges that cancer inevitably brings. All proceeds from the sales of Tea & Chemo will go to three incredibly important charities, whose compassionate care and professionalism make the difference to so many lives: The Haven, Breast Cancer Now and The Robert Ogden Macmillan Centre, Harrogate. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Swimming with the tide'

Swimming with the tide (2015)

Stourcastle Books

I wanted to write this book to share my experience of dealing with a challenge that many women face. It's not dark, it's not gloomy. It's not filled with photos that will make you weep. I've tried to capture my emotions at the time, including the humour. Every diagnosis is different, every account is different. This is mine. All royalties paid to me by Amazon are being donated to Macmillan Cancer Support. (Author) 

Cover image of 'Invincibility in the face of prostate cancer: coming out the other side'

Invincibility in the face of prostate cancer: coming out the other side (2015)

The Cloister House Press

Throughout his extensive career Alfred Samuels was a bodyguard to some the world's most recognised celebrities. He was a physically active and mentally alert individual who provided the needs of his particular industry over many years. In January 2012 his world came to a sudden and unforeseeable halt when he was diagnosed with advanced metastatic prostate cancer, stage four. Alfred Samuels’ honest and frank account is one part of his mission to challenge men's attitudes and the taboo surrounding prostate cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Gifted by grief. A true story of cancer, loss and rebirth'

Gifted by grief. A true story of cancer, loss and rebirth (2015)

Living Well Publications

Is it really possible to be grateful for your husband’s death? This is the message that ultimately comes over in Jane Duncan Rogers’ book Gifted By Grief: A True Story of Cancer, Loss and Rebirth. Told through the medium of blog posts by her husband in his last year, her own journal entries, and a heartfelt, poignant and riveting narrative, Jane invites the reader into her grief-stricken world. Where this might be harrowing, it is found to be ironic; where there might be pointlessness and despair, gifts are found, inspiring the reader find the gifts in their own life situation. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The inflatable woman'

The inflatable woman (2015)

Bloomsbury Publishing

Iris (or balletgirl-42 as she's known on the internet dating circuit) is a zookeeper looking for love when she is diagnosed with breast cancer. Overnight, her life becomes populated with a carnival of daunting hospital characters. Despite the attempts of her friends – Maud, Granma Suggs, Larry the Monkey and a group of singing penguins – to comfort her, Iris's fears begin to encircle her until all she has to cling to is the attention of a lighthouse keeper called sailor_buoy_39. The Inflatable Woman combines magic realism with the grit of everyday life to create a poignant and surreal journey inside the human psyche. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Flying free. Powerful journeys of those who dare to live'

Flying free. Powerful journeys of those who dare to live (2015)

Self-published using Grosvenor House Publishing

Experiencing an incredibly uplifting, thriving face of this disease – a face that does NOT come across in the media, Jacinta brings you the inspirited personal journeys of those who DARE to LIVE magnificently showing the limitless power of the human spirit and the indescribable love of God. This is the beginning! "Cancer has opened up the world for me and given me life. I have made choices I never thought I would, held beliefs I didn't know I had, turned inside out and didn't know I could! Being in the same boat calls me to write Flying Free from the inside, as it were. This feels effortless, fearless, limitless and fulfilling, all at the same time". (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Pear shaped'

Pear shaped (2015)

Self-published using CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Adam is a 44-year-old London lawyer and father of three. Completely out of the blue, and for no reason other than sheer dumb chance, he was diagnosed with a rare and aggressive brain tumour. Adam has endured radiotherapy and chemotherapy which were preceded by major brain surgery to remove the tumour - helpfully described by his surgeon as being the size and shape of a pear. Using the blackest of humour, this book charts Adam's journey from normality to having a disease regularly described as a “death sentence”. How will he cope with the treatment? How will his relationship with family and friends be affected? Most important of all, how will his hair come through this? Quite simply, it is the funniest book so far this year about brain cancer. Warning - this book is intended for mature audiences due to the subject matter and use of strong language. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Because you were there'

Because you were there (2015)

Austin Macauley

'The grief I feel now seems to have unlocked so many grieves and insecurities from the past I thought I'd long overcome. I feel so small without you; my heart feels totally lost.' On August 18th 2013, phones buzzed, babies were born, and families enjoyed a Sunday day out. But Sally Dalzel's world fell apart. Her husband of 26 years passed away and she plunged into loneliness and isolation. In private letters to her husband, Sally documented her journey from mourning back to love, acceptance, and joy. She hopes that by publishing her letters, she will provide support to others struggling with the grieving process. It may be of help to those traversing the first few months when they wonder if this is how it will always feel, or for training purposes as it is written from first-hand experience, rather than by a professional. (Author)

Cover image of 'Unplanned journey'

Unplanned journey (2015)

Matador

Unplanned Journey is a breast cancer diary with candid and beautifully observed photography by award-winning photographer, Bella West. It shows the 18-month period in the life of a middle-aged woman, Tiggy Walker (who happens to be married to BBC Radio 2's Johnnie Walker), undergoing her breast cancer treatment and reconstruction. What seemed a cruel sentence ends up with Tiggy having neater breasts than she could ever have hoped for, and a renewed outlook on her life. The journey may have been unplanned, but it is the most important one she has taken. Tiggy does not hold back in this book; she openly discusses the challenges she faced, her hatred of chemo and her relationship with Johnnie. She bravely exposes her voluptuous body for the photos, as she documents what physical changes occur. This book is essential reading for anyone who has been through cancer - as a patient or a carer - and for anyone about to go through treatment for breast cancer. Royalties from the book will be going to Carers UK. (Publisher)

Cover image of '5 months, 10 years, 2 hours'

5 months, 10 years, 2 hours (2015)

Outpost19

When a disillusioned New York attorney decides to leave the law, buy a lipstick-red convertible, and hit the road, she doesn't expect to wake up in a hospital room with a malignant brain tumor and a prognosis of one year to live. Or that ten years later, she'll be competing in a grueling triathlon. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'A life turned upside down'

A life turned upside down (2015)

Little Knoll Press

The story of young mum, Nikki Hastings, who went to her doctor with a painful hip and several days later was given a diagnosis of terminal cancer with only months to live. Due to her willingness to try new treatments and determination to make the best of her remaining time, Nikki’s life was extended by years. This is her story. The author’s royalty and all profit from sales of this book will be donated to Lewis-Manning Hospice. (Publisher)

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