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The web Directory of Information Materials for People Affected by Cancer is regularly updated and currently has details of over 1,900 booklets, leaflets, books and audiovisual materials for people affected by cancer. Most have been published in the last five years but we have included some older ones that are still useful.

Results: 192

Cover image of 'All to live for. Fighting cancer. Finding hope.'

All to live for. Fighting cancer. Finding hope. (2017)

Headline

In 2005 Emma Hannigan was 32, happily married to her long-time love, with two young children. Her world was shattered when she discovered that she had the rare gene BRCA1, meaning a 50% chance of developing ovarian cancer and an 85% chance of breast cancer. To reduce the risk, Emma had a double mastectomy and both ovaries removed, but in 2007 received the news that cancer had struck anyway. Twelve years later, Emma is battling cancer for the tenth time. With warmth and wisdom, she shares her journey and her advice on everything from skincare and hair loss to how to keep a sense of humour through it all. All to Live For is a story of one woman's determination not to let cancer win; a story of strength and inspiration, hope and love. And of never giving up. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Well. A doctor's journey through fear to freedom'

Well. A doctor's journey through fear to freedom (2017)

Saraband

When Dr Mary Gunn was diagnosed with cancer, her first reaction was fear, and to fight the disease aggressively for the sake of not only herself but her young children and husband. But when it came back – and turned out to be incurable – she knew that she couldn’t live the rest of her life in fear. Mary embraced a new approach to life: to accept all the joy and sorrow, safety and danger, certainty and unpredictability… in essence, to live freely. In our uncertain times, when it’s difficult not to feel the fear, Dr Mary Gunn’s remarkable memoir offers mindfulness tools for resilience, and shows how we can all use acceptance, compassion and love to live courageously, magnificently. Backed up by many years of experience as both a doctor and a patient, her story will inspire you to let go of fear, love life and live well. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Chemo summer. An uplifting breast cancer experience'

Chemo summer. An uplifting breast cancer experience (2017)

Austin Macauley

In Chemo Summer Jane Hoggar takes the reader through a light-hearted and informative account of her discovery of breast cancer and its cure. Cancer of any description has the capacity to chill those it affects and their loved ones. But for Jane Hoggar early discovery and diagnosis provided for a satisfactory resolution. And it's these small details that might well help people in a similar situation. For example, Jane did not discover a lump, which is the usual thing in breast cancer, but a sag' when she raised her arms and it was her insistence that something was wrong that resulted in a vital early medical diagnosis. All the side issues are covered in the book, effects of chemo and radiotherapy, hair loss and wigs, changes in diet and exercise, making Chemo Summer a valuable and engaging look into a serious and often frightening subject. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Love, light and mermaid tails. One woman's healing journey back to wholeness through stage four cancer'

Love, light and mermaid tails. One woman's healing journey back to wholeness through stage four cancer (2017)

Fi Munro

In January 2016, at the age of 30, Fi Munro was diagnosed with non-genetic stage four ovarian cancer. In that moment, after months of pain, tests and assurances that it was ‘nothing to worry about’, her instincts were proved right and her worst fears were realised. In the months that followed, understanding her diagnosis, recovery and health became her full-time job. Using her expertise as a researcher she dedicated her time to understanding everything she could about her diagnosis and subsequent prognosis. In this honest, open and often tear-jerking account of her journey back to wholeness, Fi openly shares her story from diagnosis with stage four ‘terminal’ cancer to living an incredible, healthy life full of joy and laughter. This book is a guide for anyone, not just those with cancer, who wants to embrace a happier, healthier and more caring approach to their life. May it bring you hope, peace and, above all, joy. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Dolly daydreamer'

Dolly daydreamer (2017)

Austin Macauley

Rachel and Simon have been married for a long time. They are both parents and grandparents. They love Portugal, but life isn’t as perfect as it appears on the surface. Rachel had breast cancer and as time goes on, family circumstances threaten the very fabric of the family. Is their family unit strong enough to survive what the future has in store for Rachel, Simon and the rest of their family? (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Going on the turn. A memoir'

Going on the turn. A memoir (2017)

Weidenfeld and Nicholson

Danny Baker's third volume of memoirs barrels along at the same cracking pace as its predecessors, the bestselling Going to Sea in a Sieve (the inspiration for the major TV series Cradle to Grave and subsequent nationwide tour) and Going off Alarming. With his trademark exuberance, he recalls the years which included six years' involvement in the massive TV hit TFI Friday ('piling it up with hellzapoppin' ideas') - during which time he stalked John Cleese in New York, entertained David Bowie and Paul McCartney, bizarrely reunites with Sir Michael Caine, gets befriended by Peter O'Toole and becomes a member of Led Zeppelin for 35 minutes. However, the tales are not reliant on celebrity alone, and the book comes packed with the usual quota of Baker family jewels, including Spud's attitude to doctors, Danny's trip to Amsterdam to get stoned for the first time (he fails), getting caught up in football rioting, and the now infamous 'kaboom' of an outburst following his despatch from BBC London. And then there's the cancer. Spoiler alert: this is the one in which he almost dies. Further spoiler alert: he doesn't. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Dear cancer, love Victoria: a mum’s diary of hope'

Dear cancer, love Victoria: a mum’s diary of hope (2017)

Trapeze (Orion)

Renowned as a much-loved and highly respected BBC journalist, Victoria Derbyshire has spent 20 years finding the human story behind the headlines. In 2015 she found herself at the heart of the news, with a devastating breast cancer diagnosis. With honesty and openness, she decided to live out her treatment and recovery in the spotlight in a series of video diaries that encouraged thousands to seek diagnosis and help. Victoria has kept a diary since she was nine years old and in DEAR CANCER, LOVE VICTORIA she shares her day to day experiences of life following her diagnosis and coming to terms with a future that wasn't planned. From the moment she woke up to find her right breast had collapsed, to telling her partner and children, through to mastectomy and chemotherapy. From wearing a wig to work and hiding it from her colleagues, to the relief and joy of finishing treatment before immediately flying to Glasgow to present a debate on the European Referendum. By sharing her story, she became the person that mums, daughters, sisters, husbands, boyfriends and family members contacted to thank as they tried to find ways to cope with their own and their loved ones' prognosis, and needed to know that they were not alone. Victoria's story is an affecting and at times heart-breaking one but it is so often laugh-out-loud too. Moving, wonderfully heartwarming and ultimately uplifting, this is a powerful account of a brave struggle told with honesty, courage and emotion that gives strength to anyone touched by cancer. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The bright hour. A memoir of living and dying'

The bright hour. A memoir of living and dying (2017)

The Text Publishing Company (UK) Ltd

In January 2015 Nina was diagnosed with breast cancer, and it metastasised later that year. She was thirty-eight years old; her mother had died only a few months earlier from multiple myeloma. Nina Riggs grew up in a contemplative family: her great-great-great-grandfather was Ralph Waldo Emerson, and she was raised to turn to his essays for 'guidance, inspiration, and something to push against'. THE BRIGHT HOUR is Nina's intimate, unflinching account of 'living with death in the room'. She tells her story in a series of absurd, poignant and often hilarious vignettes drawn from a life that has 'no real future or arc left to it, yet still goes on as if it does'. This unforgettable memoir leads the reader into the innermost chambers of the writer's life: into the mind and heart, the work and home and family, of a young woman alternately seeking to make peace with and raging against the reality of her approaching death. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'The finch in my brain'

The finch in my brain (2017)

Hodder & Stoughton

When film producer Martino Sclavi began experiencing intense headaches, he attributed them to his frenetic lifestyle. As it turned out, he had grade 4 brain cancer and was given 18 months to live. After undergoing brain surgery - while awake - Martino found he had lost the ability to recognise words. His response was to close his eyes and begin to move his fingers across the keyboard to write this, an account of life before diagnosis and since. Defying all predictions Martino is still very much alive, words read out to him by the monotone of a computerised voice he calls Alex. But he must now live in a new way. This book - that he has written but cannot read - charts the effects of his experience: on his relationship with his young son, his marriage, his work and with himself. In the wake of his illness, everything must be reconfigured and Martino is made to question the habits, dreams and beliefs of his old life and confront the present. What he finds is strange and beautiful. Searching for the words between life and death, Sclavi shows that with determination and a subtle, persistent sense of humour, it is possible to change the story of our lives. (Publisher)

Cover image of 'Hug everyone you know: a year of community, courage, and cancer'

Hug everyone you know: a year of community, courage, and cancer (2017)

She Writes Press

Antoinette Martin believed herself to be a healthy and sturdy woman--that is, until she received a Stage 1 breast cancer diagnosis. Cancer is scary enough for the brave, but for a wimp like Martin, it was downright terrifying. Martin had to swallow waves of nausea at the thought of her body being poisoned, and frequently fainted during blood draws and infusions. To add to her terror, cancer suddenly seemed to be all around her. In the months following her diagnosis, a colleague succumbed to cancer, and five of her friends were also diagnosed. Though tempted, Martin knew she could not hide in bed for ten months. She had a devoted husband, daughters, and a tribe of friends and relations. Along with work responsibilities, there were graduations, anniversaries, and roller derby bouts to attend, not to mention a house to sell and a summer of beach-bumming to enjoy. In order to harness support without scaring herself or anyone else, she journaled her experiences and began to e-mail the people who loved her--the people she called My Everyone. She kept them informed and reminded all to 'hug everyone you know' at every opportunity. Reading the responses became her calming strategy. Ultimately, with the help of her community, Martin found the courage within herself to face cancer with perseverance and humor. (Publisher)

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